PipeChat Digest #99 - Friday, October 10, 1997
 
Sorry, I don't think I said what I wanted to say
  by Jason D Comet <krummhorn8@juno.com>
Re: Question???????
  by bruce cornely <cremona84000@webtv.net>
Re: Question???????
  by bruce cornely <cremona84000@webtv.net>
Re: A Few Good CDs
  by <Prestant16@aol.com>
Re: Question???????
  by Nelson and Tracy Denton <ndenton434@bigwave.ca>
loud-soft Bourdon
  by Donald Pole <pandk@mail.wincom.net>
Question???????   Can I get away with "overkill"?
  by Richard Schneider <arpncorn@dave-world.net>
 


(back) Subject: Sorry, I don't think I said what I wanted to say From: krummhorn8@juno.com (Jason D Comet) Date: Thu, 9 Oct 1997 21:48:13 -0400   <This message came back to me, sorry if you have already got it in your mailboxes> ================================================================== I'm sorry for writing and filling up everyone's mailboxes, but, I don't think I stated what I wanted to do.   I wanted to ADD a 16' Leiblickgedeckt to my pedal division. I really appreciate your other suggestions, I got to learn something, but I was going to stick with another rank, or a digital stop (which I want to avoid) (I am really against it if you have the space).   The congregation likes bass, but they said that was TOO much. They prefere to have bass during communion or any other quiet time. (but not too much) :-)   Presently, the Bourdon Flute rank is SSSSSSSSSSSOOOOOOOOOOO out of whack, that I am going to talk to to our organ servicer, and ask him if I can regulate the wind pressure on the pipes. I also want to "update" the complete organ. We presently have a LOT of moving parts that act as switches. I've done some research and found that Peterson has all the parts I want for the insturment. I was telling "cremona8400" (Bruce) about the organ and how it was a mess when they installed it from the "old church" and the special concideration they DIDN'T take (in both transporting it and reinstalling it). (i.e. laying the pipes in the sun on the (luckily) dry grass.) |:-|   I could tell you EVERYTHING that is wrong with the insturment, if you want to know (ya, right) respond privatly. :-)     Jason Comet Krummhorn8@juno.com |\ | \ O    
(back) Subject: Re: Question??????? From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Thu, 9 Oct 1997 22:00:33 -0400   Actually, there is wide variety of cathedral organs. St. Pauls in Burlington Vt has a 2 /35? Karl Wilhelm. Just get the things that you want to sound good. For a home organ I would get alot of 8' stuff with colorful voicing and some good reeds. It's all relative.   Bruce Cornely, organist (OHS & AGO) University United Methodist Church and Student Center Wicks ('56) 3/16r Gainesville Florida Dean, Gainesville Chapter AGO  
(back) Subject: Re: Question??????? From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Thu, 9 Oct 1997 22:01:03 -0400   I guess that means the answer is "yes".   Bruce Cornely, organist (OHS & AGO) University United Methodist Church and Student Center Wicks ('56) 3/16r Gainesville Florida Dean, Gainesville Chapter AGO  
(back) Subject: Re: A Few Good CDs From: Prestant16@aol.com Date: Thu, 9 Oct 1997 22:04:07 -0400 (EDT)   I left out a recording of Michael Murrys that I have it is: "Franck, The Complete Masterworks for Organ" at St. Sernin Basilica (Cavaill=E8-Coll)   William C.  
(back) Subject: Re: Question??????? From: Nelson and Tracy Denton <ndenton434@bigwave.ca> Date: Thu, 09 Oct 1997 22:41:28   At 09:29 PM 10/9/97 -0400, you wrote: >Could you possibly put a cathedral sized organ on a very low wind >pressure and fit it in about an average house and a half sized church? >(Please say yes :-) ) > >Jason Comet   Well it depends on whether you plan to live in the house or not :-)))     A few observations from a rather sleepy guy. . . .   A cathedral sized organ will take up a big space. Does your house/church have this kind of extra room? You will require a high ceiling for the larger pipes to stand upright in unless you plan to place them horizontally in the room. A large room is required for the bass tones to be properly produced. and to allow the sound to mix in the room.   Is your flooring capable of withstanding 15 to 20+ tons of hardware piled on it. Plus the vibration an organ of this size will create?   Are you planning to build an organ with new pipes and chestwork, or use old pipework on old chestwork? It is very difficult to successfully lower the windpressure on an organ and still have the pipes and chestwork sound the same and operate properly. - It's better to start with a small scale organ and add small scale pipework to it than to try to soften a 15" WurliTzer Diaphonic Diapason into a 2" Gemshorn. Ok "SMG" could probably do this and make it sing, but we are talking real world organs here.   Do you have the money and time to put in to a project of this magnitude? Remember an organ always costs 10 times as much as you think it would and takes 5 years longer to install than you thought it would.   Does your spouse and children agree with you on this project? If they do get it in writing now!   Build a DOGHOUSE FIRST you will spend a great deal of the rest of your life in it anyways so you might as well get it set up to match your dreamworld lifestyle.   There really are members on this list who have such beasts in their homes and still have time for writing e-mails to each other. ( of course they have no other lives or families -but what the heck. :- ))))   The life span of a person who embarks on such a project is very short. Get a good life insurance policy first. They call home pipe organs "Widow Makers" don't they?   Above all YES IT IS POSSIBLE!!!!     P.S. Now for An unashamed free plug for a very good company. . .   For all those who wish to "Do it Yourself" ( and especially the very Serious types too) Check out the New 1997-98 LEE VALLEY TOOLS CATALOGUE $5.00 cdn refundable with first purchase.   @http://www.leevalley.com   252 full colour pages of specialized woodworking, clockmaking, toy, musical instrument, hobby, gardening and other tools and supplies.   Check out the Harpsicord on page 249   It's to die for stuff. :-)))) I've got at least one of everything*.     ( *but only on my christmas wish list :-((((( ) Nelson E. Denton R. A. Denton and Son Pipe Organ Builders Hamilton Ontario Canada  
(back) Subject: loud-soft Bourdon From: Donald Pole <pandk@mail.wincom.net> Date: Fri, 10 Oct 1997 00:05:33 -0400 (EDT)   I have seen in a couple of organs the following system...it looks odd, but works:   The pipes are tuned to the low wind pressure. When the "loud" stop is put on, and introduces higher wind pressure to the wind chest, a pneumatic motor is inflated and pivots up a row of metal shades in front of the pipe mouths. The distance from the shade to the pipe mouth is adjustable. Thus, the sharpening caused by higher pressure is cancelled by the flattening effect of the shades.   Don    
(back) Subject: Question??????? Can I get away with "overkill"? From: Richard Schneider <arpncorn@dave-world.net> Date: Fri, 10 Oct 1997 00:00:42 -0700   On Thu, 9 Oct 1997 21:29:13 -0400, Jason D Comet <krummhorn8@juno.com> wrote: > Could you possibly put a cathedral sized organ on a very low wind > pressure and fit it in about an average house and a half sized church? > (Please say yes :-) )   I will only say yes if you agree to the following:   1) You have a budget enough to afford it.   2) That you understand that you simply don't take an organ voiced for a cathedral and put it in the smaller room and then simply drop the pressure and hope for the best. It requires extensive Tonal Finishing for the space it is housed in.   3) That you understand that there are other factors besides windpressure that will contribute to the success or failure of the "cathedral sized" organ in the house or half-sized church.   Dr. Eugene Blackstone, recently departed from this list, is probably the most premier example of a person who "put his money where his mouth was" and came up with an outstanding instrument in a slightly-larger-than-average home (and no separate Music Room, either!)   The instrument boasts of IV manuals and 68 ranks.   Would it work in a cathedral if it were moved there? No; not at all.   Does it work successfully in its existing environment? Absolutely.   Will it sound that way when it's moved into a new residence? Probably not without more extensive Tonal Finishing, as was done in the present residence.   This is true not only with organs in houses and "half-sized" churches, but in all venues, in order to be a success. The lack of this effort is generally the reason an instrument fails to please and is condemned as being "bad work".   So, the answer IS indeed, yes, but with the qualifications I just stated above.   Faithfully,   / ^ ^ \ { (O) (O) } --------oOOOo--------U-------oOOOo------------   "Arp in the Corn Patch" Rich Schneider SCHNEIDER PIPE ORGANS, Inc. Organbuilders SNAILMAIL:41-43 Johnston Street P.O. Box 137 Kenney, Il 61749-0137 (217) 944-2454 VOX (217) 944-2527 FAX EMAIL: mailto:arpncorn@dave-world.net