PipeChat Digest #63 - Monday, September 8, 1997
 
 


(back) Subject: Re: Yet More on the Funeral From: Ron Yost <musik@tcsn.net> Date: Sun, 07 Sep 1997 05:15:17 -0700   At 11:40 7:24 PM 9/6/97 -0500, you wrote:   Yes, I noticed that. Didn't I hear an announcer say it was a tenor bell? Really .. ONE bell?     >What about the bells? It sounded like two towers of bells ringing >alternate changes, and one tower sounded like it was an octave lower than >the other. It sounded very wonderful and exciting. My wife who rings on a >ten bell chime stand in our church was riveted. Does Westminster have >bells in both towers or was it between Westminster and St. Margaret's? >What's the story? > >Ken > >============================================================================ >==Kenneth G. Potter, Minister of Music >St. Peter's Episcopal Church, Westchester Square 914/358-2528 >2500 Westchester Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461 tracker@j51.com >=========================================================================== === > > > > > > > > > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >  
(back) Subject: Re: Pachelbel Canon in D (among other things) From: ManderUSA@aol.com Date: Sun, 7 Sep 1997 08:32:21 -0400 (EDT)   In a message dated 97-09-07 00:43:47 EDT, Shirley writes:   << Now, to the point. I heard a part of the Pachelbel Canon in D (affectionately called "Taco Bell Cannon" by many of us). Has anybody found a suitable organ arrangement of it? >>   I have the lazy man's edition, by Drummond Wolfe, which I happily use (draw whatever conclusion you like!)! I wondered, in hearing it as played at the funeral, if either the organist had constructed his own transcription from the string parts, or if there was an edition that has done that, or if he was reading it from a score. We were not allowed a clear hearing of it, even on the BBC feed, but what I could hear sounded wonderfully intricate and interesting. There was a thread some time ago (on PipOrg-L, I believe) about this work, wondering, among other things, why this obviously non-canon was called Canon, and the answer came back that there were indeed canons amongst the upper string parts. These are not reflected in any way in the Wolfe edition.   Oops, off to church!   Malcolm Wechsler N. P. Mander, Ltd. - U. S. A.    
(back) Subject: Re: Bells at the Funeral From: Jlokken@aol.com Date: Sun, 7 Sep 1997 10:19:19 -0400 (EDT)   Ken and Ron asked about the bells. Here's what I gleaned from the other list. Please correct me if this is not correct.   Before the funeral, during the procession, a single bell, the tenor, was tolled about once every minute.   Just as the coffin was being carried into the Abbey, we heard the bells of Parliament's tower chiming the hour, and Big Ben. This had nothing to do with the Abbey or the funeral. It was just nearby. It did indicate the precise timing of the procession.   After the funeral, following the minute of silence, we heard a peal from the bells of the Abbey (sounded like 8 bells). It was a half-muffled peal, achieved by putting leather pads on one side of the clappers, so that when swung one direction, the strike is muffled, but not in the other. The bells rotate a full 360 degrees in the English fashion. The ringers did a superb job.   Each scale or change was echoed by the muffled bells. First several descending scales, then changes, following a pattern which one poster identified as Steadman Caters, with the lowest bell ringing behind on every change. Someone said it sounded like the dropping of tears. A uniquely English sound, absolutely right for the event, and very well executed.   All I know about change ringing, however, is gleaned from Dorothy Sayers' "The Nine Tailors." I hope those who know more about this bit of Anglican arcana will tell us more.   Jim Lokken  
(back) Subject: Re: Yet More on the Funeral From: "Richard Scott-Copeland" <organist@interalpha.co.uk> Date: Sun, 7 Sep 1997 16:20:51 +0100       ---------- > From: Ron Yost <musik@tcsn.net> > To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> > Subject: Re: Yet More on the Funeral > Date: 07 September 1997 13:15 > > At 11:40 7:24 PM 9/6/97 -0500, you wrote: > > Yes, I noticed that. Didn't I hear an announcer say it was a tenor bell? > Really .. ONE bell? > > > >What about the bells? It sounded like two towers of bells ringing > >alternate changes, and one tower sounded like it was an octave lower than > >the other. It sounded very wonderful and exciting. My wife who rings on a > >ten bell chime stand in our church was riveted. Does Westminster have > >bells in both towers or was it between Westminster and St. Margaret's? > >What's the story? > > > >Ken   Dear Ken   Yes, that really was one bell!, a damn fine big'un I believe that the tenor bell at the Abbey is not part of the "ring" but a separate bell mounted right behind the "shutters" for maximum "dong".   There was only one tower of bells ringing in one church. The "Half-muffled" effect comes from the fact that these bells (like most in England's churches with decent "rings" of bells) rotate on a cradle through 360 degrees. One side of the clapper is leathered and the other is not. So.... When the bells are rotated one way, they are struck first by the non leathered clapper and when they return, they are struck by the leathered part of the clapper. A most interesting effect, reserved for very special occasions. In fact, it was originally decided that Diana was not important or Royal enough to warrant the "half-muffled" bells, being reserved for "real" Royalty. 56 million of the British country however had other ideas, however, and the authorities had to swallow their Pims and lemonade and change things.   There you go!!   Richard Scott-Copeland  
(back) Subject: Re: Pachelbel Canon in D (among other things) From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Sun, 7 Sep 1997 17:42:55 -0400   Since the cannnnon is so long, if you become bored you can sing along using the words of "Jolly Old Saint Nicholas". My father is a cellist and used to do that in rehearsals for "relief".   Bruce Cornely ============ o o o o ============== o o o ______________ o o o o o o ______________ o o o OHS ======================== AGO  
(back) Subject: Re: Yet More on the Funeral From: Shirley <pnst@voicenet.com> Date: Sun, 07 Sep 1997 17:57:06   At 05:15 09/07/97 -0700, you wrote: >At 11:40 7:24 PM 9/6/97 -0500, you wrote: > >Yes, I noticed that. Didn't I hear an announcer say it was a tenor bell? >Really .. ONE bell?   The tenor bell was rung once a minute as the cortege approached Westminster. The change ringing after the service sounded like it went a range of a tenth, from an F# down to D, first in the higher octave and then repeating it in the lower octave.   They said that each clapper was wrapped in leather to muffle the sound. Throughout England, residents of even the smallest town awoke last Sunday to the sound of muffled bells, only used for somber occasions. That was the first clue many of the English had that something was amiss. That, according to Bernie what's-his-name on CNN.   --Shirley  
(back) Subject: Re: Pachelbel Canon in D From: Ron Hemmel <ohemmel@mail.eclipse.net> Date: Sun, 7 Sep 1997 20:01:57 +0100   Malcolm Wechsler writes:   >I have the lazy man's edition, by Drummond Wolfe,   <snip>   >There was a thread some time ago (on PipOrg-L, I believe) about >this work, wondering, among other things, why this obviously non-canon was >called Canon, and the answer came back that there were indeed canons amongst >the upper string parts. These are not reflected in any way in the Wolfe >edition.   I have never been happy with this transcription for that very reason.   IMHO, one would really need a third hand to bring out the three-part canon of the upper voices - played, of course, on three different manuals. If one plays all three parts on one manual, the inter-weaving lines disappear. Part of the charm of this piece is the way in which the parts do intertwine (apart from the cerebral joy we all experience from the three-voice-canon-over-a-ground-bass design ;-)>).   -Ron      
(back) Subject: Those Bells From: ManderUSA@aol.com Date: Sun, 7 Sep 1997 20:51:17 -0400 (EDT)   In a message dated 97-09-07 18:08:40 EDT, Shirley writes:   << The change ringing after the service sounded like it went a range of a tenth, from an F# down to D, first in the higher octave and then repeating it in the lower octave. They said that each clapper was wrapped in leather to muffle the sound. >>   Hi Shirley,   This is what I think I have sorted out: You were hearing the same change twice. Each bell is being operated by a rope, one person per rope, and ONE SIDE of each clapper had leather affixed to it. When the first bell of the change is sounded, the bell is swinging in one direction, and hitting the unmuffled side of the clapper, and this is the case with each succeeding bell until the change is complete. Then the first ringer, whose bell has been cocked (poised on top) is ready for his second swing, as a sort of echo change begins, this time in the other direction (as the bell returns the other way), and this time it hits the damped side of the clapper. I had not thought of it, but I can see how it would seem they were going to a lower octave, but actually it was the same bells again, this time muffled. I have never heard this done before, and thought at first that perhaps at the Abbey, the two towers each contain a matching set of bells, but someone on TV or perhaps on this list explained it. It is an amazing and moving effect. If I have it wrong, a wiser head with personal change ringing experience will hopefully tell all.   When I was at St. Paul's Cathedral in London, Ontario, in the 60s, we lived with the frustration of a peal of 13 (?) bells that had been fixed in place, because of fears that the tower would no longer withstand the pressure of swinging bells. We were left with a wooden clavier up in the tower, and committed the possibly unforgivable sin of actually playing changes on these bells, using the clavier. A group of us learned something of the change patterns, and all faithfully read the Nine Tailors of Dorothy Sayers, which has been mentioned on one of the lists. (The murder is solved by working out the changes!) The tower had many names of change ringers written on the walls, with notes like "The following were on duty to celebrate the Coronation of George V, June 22, 1911." Often the list was quite long, as the ringing of the changes could go on for hours, and reenforcements were needed (and apparently lots of beer!). A few miles north of London was the quite small town of Exeter, Ontario, which had a remarkably large Anglican church (Trivett Memorial Church) with, if I remember correctly, six bells, originally swinging but fixed as at the cathedral, and for the same reasons.   So be it,   Malcolm Wechsler N. P. Mander, Ltd. - U. S. A.  
(back) Subject: Re: Those Bells From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com> Date: Sun, 7 Sep 1997 20:34:59 -0500 (CDT)   At 08:51 PM 9/7/97 -0400, Malcolm Wechsler wrote: >with the frustration of a peal of 13 (?) bells that had been fixed in place, >because of fears that the tower would no longer withstand the pressure of >swinging bells.   Although my grandfather was heavily into change ringing and among other places used to ring at Holsworthy (as in S. S. Wesley's "Holsworthy Church Bells"), I purposely never got involved in bells since I knew that once hooked there would be no escape. I had already got hooked on organs, so I didn't want to succumb to anything else. After living in the U.S.A. for fifteen years, I think it is fair to say that the sound of change ringing from all the surrounding churches on Sunday mornings is the thing I miss most about England. Our little church had a ring of six bells, and the big church in town had fifteen. The sound of the bells of Oxford from Christ Church Meadow on a Sunday morning (which you can hear on the film "Shadowlands") is a sound not easily forgotten. It is interesting that even in some cases where congregations have declined and churches have been declared redundant and closed for worship, the change ringers still go on ringing.   John    
(back) Subject: Copyright Permission From: rnickel@itol.com Date: Sun, 7 Sep 1997 21:02:08 -0500 (CDT)   Our church has recently decided to purchase videotape equipment to record the worship service and broadcast over a local cable access channel. This gives rise to questions on copyright permission for music that is performed in the worship service. HELP!   We have purchased a CCLI license which, according to its definition, will authorize us to legally record (the music in) our worship services. However, if the music used is published by a publisher who does NOT belong to CCLI, I understand that one must request permission from that publisher to legally record the music. Does this mean that I must seek permission for ALL of the following elements of our worship service (should these pieces not be covered by CCLI)?   1) Choir anthems 2) Hymns 3) Organ literature   If I am correct in my assumptions, I will be spending enormous amounts of time writing letters requesting permission to use anthems, hymns, and organ pieces not covered by CCLI (e.g., Concordia, GIA, MorningStar, Augsburg-Fortress).   Please respond privately to <rnickel@itol.com>. Thanks.   Bob Nickel      
(back) Subject: Re: Those Bells From: "Jim Saenger" <chamade@Early.COM> Date: Sun, 07 Sep 97 20:31:22 PDT   Shirly and Malcolm heard what I did as far as the half-muffled peal is concerned. 10 bells, first rung in descending scales (rounds) and then into changes.   The "tolling" was interesting, however, not the effect of a drop hammer on a stationary bell. I heard the largest bell of the ring (Tenor), a D of about 1.5 tons, without muffler, do a handstroke one minute and a backstroke the next. Listening to the live coverage, this was obvious to me, because the bell did not rest on its stay and did two strikes on the second minute, a clear giveaway for the technique.   Jim Saenger   ---------- > > In a message dated 97-09-07 18:08:40 EDT, Shirley writes: > > << The change ringing after the service sounded like it went a > range of a tenth, from an F# down to D, first in the higher octave and then > repeating it in the lower octave. > > They said that each clapper was wrapped in leather to muffle the sound. >> > > Hi Shirley, > > This is what I think I have sorted out: You were hearing the same change > twice. Each bell is being operated by a rope, one person per rope, and ONE > SIDE of each clapper had leather affixed to it. When the first bell of the > change is sounded, the bell is swinging in one direction, and hitting the > unmuffled side of the clapper, and this is the case with each succeeding bell > until the change is complete. Then the first ringer, whose bell has been > cocked (poised on top) is ready for his second swing, as a sort of echo > change begins, this time in the other direction (as the bell returns the > other way), and this time it hits the damped side of the clapper. I had not > thought of it, but I can see how it would seem they were going to a lower > octave, but actually it was the same bells again, this time muffled. I have > never heard this done before, and thought at first that perhaps at the Abbey, > the two towers each contain a matching set of bells, but someone on TV or > perhaps on this list explained it. It is an amazing and moving effect. If I > have it wrong, a wiser head with personal change ringing experience will > hopefully tell all. > > When I was at St. Paul's Cathedral in London, Ontario, in the 60s, we lived > with the frustration of a peal of 13 (?) bells that had been fixed in place, > because of fears that the tower would no longer withstand the pressure of > swinging bells. We were left with a wooden clavier up in the tower, and > committed the possibly unforgivable sin of actually playing changes on these > bells, using the clavier. A group of us learned something of the change > patterns, and all faithfully read the Nine Tailors of Dorothy Sayers, which > has been mentioned on one of the lists. (The murder is solved by working out > the changes!) The tower had many names of change ringers written on the > walls, with notes like "The following were on duty to celebrate the > Coronation of George V, June 22, 1911." Often the list was quite long, as the > ringing of the changes could go on for hours, and reenforcements were needed > (and apparently lots of beer!). A few miles north of London was the quite > small town of Exeter, Ontario, which had a remarkably large Anglican church > (Trivett Memorial Church) with, if I remember correctly, six bells, > originally swinging but fixed as at the cathedral, and for the same reasons. > > So be it, > > Malcolm Wechsler > N. P. Mander, Ltd. - U. S. A. > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >      
(back) Subject: Re: Those Bells From: Ron Yost <musik@tcsn.net> Date: Sun, 07 Sep 1997 19:59:28 -0700   Hi All!   I've been doing a little Web searching today on the subject of Church Bells. The following U.K. sites have MUCH information .. fascinating topic, to me!   Hope you have a couple of hours to spend on these sites! :)   "RINGING RESOURCES": ------------------- == Links to many, many other sites as well as comprehensive information.   http://www.doc.ic.ac.uk/~rb/ringing.html   One of the sites from the above list:   "THE GUILD OF DEVONSHIRE RINGERS" --------------------------------- http://www.exeter.ac.uk/gdr/   == Two links to basic information pages within the Devonshire site:   "Glossary of ringing terms" --------------------------- http://www.cb1.com/cb1/John/public/ringing/glossary.html   (that's cb one .. not cb el)   "Learning to ring" ------------------ http://www.cb1.com/cb1/John/public/ringing/learning.html   According to the glossary, "Half-muffled" means:   "Muffled on one side of the clapper only, so that handstrokes ring normally and backstrokes ring quietly."   Enjoy!   Ron Yost Paso Robles, CA U.S.A.