PipeChat Digest #68 - Friday, September 12, 1997
 
Re: UK Value of a Compton electronic
  by john cormack <jcormack@cpcug.org>
Re: UK Value of a Compton electronic
  by David Scribner <david@blackiris.com>
Re: UK Value of a Compton electronic
  by john cormack <jcormack@cpcug.org>
Gober Organs Inc.  Dedication Recital -Cleveland Ohio
  by CJSD <noto@river.netrover.com>
Practical Jokes
  by Vernon Moeller <vernonm@ccsi.com>
Re: Practical Jokes
  by Rick Williams <Rick@netlink.nlink.com>
Re: Practical Jokes
  by KARL W KELLER <kwkeller@juno.com>
Re: Conn electronic pipes
  by Ron Pearcy <ronniep@clear.net.nz>
This is my first posting.
  by Rick Williams <Rick@netlink.nlink.com>
Re: This is my first posting.
  by Kenneth O. Woods <kow987@dice.nwscc.sea06.navy.mil>
Re: Ahlborne (was UK Value of a Compton electronic)
  by Bob Luderer <bobsled@nji.com>
 


(back) Subject: Re: UK Value of a Compton electronic From: john cormack <jcormack@cpcug.org> Date: Fri, 12 Sep 1997 09:37:43 -0400   At 07:44 PM 9/11/97 +0100, you wrote: >Friends: > >A local church has a two manual Compton electronic which is very >reminiscent of one my school had in the 70's. > >It is very 'basic' sounding, and I think they are getting frustrated with >it. Now, hold your breath... their organist wants "one of those new >keyboards ... they have great organ sounds these days". Please don't say >anything, I'm only quoting him ;-) > >The question is how much is it worth? ... don't forget I'm in the UK. I >'feel' that the Hammond tone cabinet they have an extension speaker might >be worth more! -------------------------------------------------------------------   I know nothing about the Compton electronic so the following may not be applicable. I have no financial or other interest in the Ahlborne MIDI boxes that may be a solution to the limited sounds from the Compton (as you describe them) provided that the Compton has MIDI capability. The Ahlborne MIDI Romantic module provides about 20 classical organ stops allocated to the Swell, Great, and Pedal manuals.   ------------------------------------------------------------------ > >BTW, if it is the same technology as the one I played at school, the tone >generation was very innovative ... but that's another story. > >TIA > >David N. >=============================================================== >David J Neal, Wrexham, Wales, UK >home: david@neal.u-net.com work: dneal@yale.ac.uk >=============================================================== > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > >  
(back) Subject: Re: UK Value of a Compton electronic From: David Scribner <david@blackiris.com> Date: Fri, 12 Sep 1997 09:08:55 -0500   >At 07:44 PM 9/11/97 +0100, you wrote: > >I know nothing about the Compton electronic so the following may >not be applicable. I have no financial or other interest in the >Ahlborne MIDI boxes that may be a solution to the limited >sounds from the Compton (as you describe them) provided that >the Compton has MIDI capability. The Ahlborne MIDI Romantic >module provides about 20 classical organ stops allocated to >the Swell, Great, and Pedal manuals. > Has anyone had actual experience with the Ahlborne MIDI module? I keep hearing about it but have not heard anything about it from someone that has actual experience with them.   David   ********************************** David Scribner Black Iris Consulting 4775 Balmoral Drive Pensacola, FL 32504-9174 850-478-9635 - Voice 850-476-0711 - Fax david@blackiris.com      
(back) Subject: Re: UK Value of a Compton electronic From: john cormack <jcormack@cpcug.org> Date: Fri, 12 Sep 1997 10:55:20 -0400   At 09:08 AM 9/12/97 -0500, you wrote: >>At 07:44 PM 9/11/97 +0100, you wrote: >> >>I know nothing about the Compton electronic so the following may >>not be applicable. I have no financial or other interest in the >>Ahlborne MIDI boxes that may be a solution to the limited >>sounds from the Compton (as you describe them) provided that >>the Compton has MIDI capability. The Ahlborne MIDI Romantic >>module provides about 20 classical organ stops allocated to >>the Swell, Great, and Pedal manuals. >> >Has anyone had actual experience with the Ahlborne MIDI module? I keep >hearing about it but have not heard anything about it from someone that has >actual experience with them. > >David > >********************************** >David Scribner >Black Iris Consulting >4775 Balmoral Drive >Pensacola, FL 32504-9174 >850-478-9635 - Voice >850-476-0711 - Fax >david@blackiris.com > > > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > --------------------------------------------------------------------   Dear David:   The local Ahlborne salesman, who knows essentially nothing about MIDI, has been to my home twice to try to get the Ahlborne Romantic module to work successfully with my Rodgers 790. He has not succeeded. An engineer from Ahlborne is supposed to come to my home next week to try to make the Ahlborne work seamlessly with my Rodgers. The sounds from the Ahlborne module, based on very limited listening to the Ahlborne, seem to be good. But perhaps not as good as the sounds built into the Rodgers 790 -- I am not sure about that. I need to be able to play the Ahlborne module for an hour or so to have a firm opinion. I expect delivery today of an Allen MDS Expander II MIDI module that is completely compatible with the Rodgers 790. In fact, the Allen module is more versatile with the Rodgers organs than it is with Allen organs!!!!   I will advise the results of next weeks visit and my impression of the sound at that time.   Sincerely,   John G. "Jack" Cormack  
(back) Subject: Gober Organs Inc. Dedication Recital -Cleveland Ohio From: CJSD <noto@river.netrover.com> Date: Fri, 12 Sep 1997 11:17:41 -0400 (EDT)   Dear List:   Sunday Sept 14, 1997 7:00 pm DEDICATION RECITAL Prof. David Boe - Oberlin Conservatory   Opus #5, Gober Organs Inc.   Church of the Good Shepherd, Lutheran 8235 Memphis Ave. Brooklyn, Ohio Tel: 216 661 9818   Music by Buxtehude, Krebs, Boehm, George Walker, William Balcom, R. Vaughan Williams, J.S Bach, Charles Marie Widor, and J. N. Lemmens.   A full description of the organ and stoplist can be found at our recently updated website:   http://www.netrover.com/~noto/gober/index.htm       ************************************************************ Simon Dyk Toronto Canada   GOBER ORGANS INC. http://www.netrover.com/~noto/gober/index.htm CHURCH OF THE TRANSFIGURATION http://www.interlog.com/~transfig/trans.htm    
(back) Subject: Practical Jokes From: Vernon Moeller <vernonm@ccsi.com> Date: Fri, 12 Sep 1997 11:28:26   Friends:   Judging from the wonderful senses of humor that you have exhibited in the past, regarding such items as wedding and funeral disasters that we can all laugh at now (but probably not then), I was wondering if any of you had any musical practical jokes that you either participated in or heard about?   I got my BA in Music at St Mary's University, in San Antonio. (Yes, Virginia, there really is a Music Dept at St Mary's - it's just that it usually graduates high school band and choir directors, not piano majors like me.) During my freshman year there (1969-70), the dept was located in two long, 1-story barracks buildings, raised on stakes in a desolate field. The bandhall had egg cartons nailed upon the walls to keep the sound in (not very effective). Whenever it rained hard, you could stand at one end of the band hall and look to the opposite side and down the hall where the practice rooms were, and if you were patient enough, you could see the practice room section of the building slooowly shift while the hard ground underneath turned to mud. (I'm not making this up, you know!)   Anyway, every year, we got some new instruments. One year it was a pair of kettle drums. My freshman year it was a gong, or tam-tam or whatever you want to call it. It was a large round disk with the edges curled under, and it was suspended from a circular stand. It was heavy and difficult to move, and it came with a huge mallet with the business end covered in thick wool wrapped around it several times.   Now, for those of you unfamiliar with the way a gong works, it's really made to have somebody use the mallet to hit it several times softly, because the sound really builds quickly. This sound, at its apex, can easily drown out the Wanamaker organ's ophicleide stop, especially if you're standing in front of it. Judging from this bit of data, you can no doubt imagine what would happen if anybody dared to really smack it. (You're ahead of me on this one, aren't you?)   Well, I wasn't there for the first gong attack, but here's what happened: the dept classroom had the desks facing the blackboard at the front of the room. There were French doors leading from the back, behind the students, into the dept office, where the dept head, Leo R Green, advised students and did other dept head tasks. He is a fantastic pianist and a wonderful arranger, plus an excellent band director and teacher. He also has a truly diabolical sense of humor. The gong was shipped to him at the University, and he kept it hidden for a special occasion. That occasion occurred soon afterwards when a music appreciation class happened to be listening intently to the 1812 Overture. Now, their backs were to the French doors, so while the orchestra's strings were soaring ever higher, building up to the momentous climax, complete with bells and cannons, Leo and a buddy were slowly opening the French doors, exposing the deadly gong. At precisely the right moment, Leo whacked the gong so hard it nearly flew off the stand. As everybody turned to see what had caused the initial metallic THUNK! the gong went off WHOOOOOOOOOMMMM!!! causing 20 students and one bald teacher to jump for the ceiling. It was hilarious!   I guess if you did that now, you'd get sued for attempting to deafen somebody.   The last attack occurred a few days later, when the gong assumed its rightful position among the other percussion utility instruments in the band hall. Now, we had several male students in the music dept, but only 2 girls. They were both piano majors like me. Jackie stayed away from the bandhall, as a rule, but Marian came in to practice between classes. Marian was a snob. On cold winter mornings, the guys would stand around the one tiny space heater in the bandhall, watching the girls walk up from their dorm into the cafeteria, on the other side of our muddy field. Naturally, guys being guys, we spent a lot of time comparing various feminine physical attributes and discussing their reputations and our preferences. (St Mary's used to be a men's college, so men were still in the majority at that time.) Whenever Marian would come in, somebody would offer, "Good morning, Marian," to which she usually responded, icily, "Drop dead!" Naturally, you can see how we guys decided to offer her warmer greetings in a way she would truly understand.   One morning we waited until she was well into her scales. All the majors and minors, up 2 octaves, split and go in opposite directions out and in 2 octaves, then up 2 more octaves and back down to the middle, split again, and then back down 2 octaves, all at breakneck speed, of course. She was well into her routine by the time we carried the gong down the hall and positioned it in front of her practice room door (the doors opened into the rooms).   Knock, knock.   The scales continued.   Knock, knock, *knock*.   The scales stopped. "Whaddya want?" she bellowed.   Silence from us, which was difficult, since we were choking back laughter.   The scales resumed.   Knock, knock.   No response - the scales continued, even louder than before.   Knock, knock, KNOCK!   The scales stopped. We heard her sigh, then scoot her bench back and walk to the door....   Somebody whispered, "3... 2... 1..." and just then, the door swung open.   THUNK!!! WHAAAAMMMMMM! The sound was ear-splitting. I know, 'cuz I was holding one side of the stand to keep the gong from flying off and into the room. After all, we didn't want to injure Marian, we just wanted to get our message across.   And it did. She was a lot friendlier after she stopped shaking and crying. She even had a few laughs with us on her way to the dept head's office.   BTW, I was the only guy in the dept ever to get a date out of her. For a while there, I was on a pedestal, but then somebody remembered that I was only a piano major, so they started ignoring me again.   Gee, I wish I could go back to those days again. Wonder what ever became of Marian?   Anybody wanna hear how I made 'em roll in the aisles during graduation that year?   Sorry this is so long, but it seems appropriate to this group.   \/\/\          
(back) Subject: Re: Practical Jokes From: Rick Williams <Rick@netlink.nlink.com> Date: Fri, 12 Sep 1997 11:53:43 -0500   I would love to hear more. Your sense of humor is spectacular!   >>> Vernon Moeller <vernonm@ccsi.com> 09/12/97 11:28AM >>> Friends:   Judging from the wonderful senses of humor that you have exhibited in the past, regarding such items as wedding and funeral disasters that we can all laugh at now (but probably not then), I was wondering if any of you had any musical practical jokes that you either participated in or heard about?   I got my BA in Music at St Mary's University, in San Antonio. (Yes, Virginia, there really is a Music Dept at St Mary's - it's just that it usually graduates high school band and choir directors, not piano majors like me.) During my freshman year there (1969-70), the dept was located in two long, 1-story barracks buildings, raised on stakes in a desolate field. The bandhall had egg cartons nailed upon the walls to keep the sound in (not very effective). Whenever it rained hard, you could stand at one end of the band hall and look to the opposite side and down the hall where the practice rooms were, and if you were patient enough, you could see the practice room section of the building slooowly shift while the hard ground underneath turned to mud. (I'm not making this up, you know!)   Anyway, every year, we got some new instruments. One year it was a pair of kettle drums. My freshman year it was a gong, or tam-tam or whatever you want to call it. It was a large round disk with the edges curled under, and it was suspended from a circular stand. It was heavy and difficult to move, and it came with a huge mallet with the business end covered in thick wool wrapped around it several times.   Now, for those of you unfamiliar with the way a gong works, it's really made to have somebody use the mallet to hit it several times softly, because the sound really builds quickly. This sound, at its apex, can easily drown out the Wanamaker organ's ophicleide stop, especially if you're standing in front of it. Judging from this bit of data, you can no doubt imagine what would happen if anybody dared to really smack it. (You're ahead of me on this one, aren't you?)   Well, I wasn't there for the first gong attack, but here's what happened: the dept classroom had the desks facing the blackboard at the front of the room. There were French doors leading from the back, behind the students, into the dept office, where the dept head, Leo R Green, advised students and did other dept head tasks. He is a fantastic pianist and a wonderful arranger, plus an excellent band director and teacher. He also has a truly diabolical sense of humor. The gong was shipped to him at the University, and he kept it hidden for a special occasion. That occasion occurred soon afterwards when a music appreciation class happened to be listening intently to the 1812 Overture. Now, their backs were to the French doors, so while the orchestra's strings were soaring ever higher, building up to the momentous climax, complete with bells and cannons, Leo and a buddy were slowly opening the French doors, exposing the deadly gong. At precisely the right moment, Leo whacked the gong so hard it nearly flew off the stand. As everybody turned to see what had caused the initial metallic THUNK! the gong went off WHOOOOOOOOOMMMM!!! causing 20 students and one bald teacher to jump for the ceiling. It was hilarious!   I guess if you did that now, you'd get sued for attempting to deafen somebody.   The last attack occurred a few days later, when the gong assumed its rightful position among the other percussion utility instruments in the band hall. Now, we had several male students in the music dept, but only 2 girls. They were both piano majors like me. Jackie stayed away from the bandhall, as a rule, but Marian came in to practice between classes. Marian was a snob. On cold winter mornings, the guys would stand around the one tiny space heater in the bandhall, watching the girls walk up from their dorm into the cafeteria, on the other side of our muddy field. Naturally, guys being guys, we spent a lot of time comparing various feminine physical attributes and discussing their reputations and our preferences. (St Mary's used to be a men's college, so men were still in the majority at that time.) Whenever Marian would come in, somebody would offer, "Good morning, Marian," to which she usually responded, icily, "Drop dead!" Naturally, you can see how we guys decided to offer her warmer greetings in a way she would truly understand.   One morning we waited until she was well into her scales. All the majors and minors, up 2 octaves, split and go in opposite directions out and in 2 octaves, then up 2 more octaves and back down to the middle, split again, and then back down 2 octaves, all at breakneck speed, of course. She was well into her routine by the time we carried the gong down the hall and positioned it in front of her practice room door (the doors opened into the rooms).   Knock, knock.   The scales continued.   Knock, knock, *knock*.   The scales stopped. "Whaddya want?" she bellowed.   Silence from us, which was difficult, since we were choking back laughter.   The scales resumed.   Knock, knock.   No response - the scales continued, even louder than before.   Knock, knock, KNOCK!   The scales stopped. We heard her sigh, then scoot her bench back and walk to the door....   Somebody whispered, "3... 2... 1..." and just then, the door swung open.   THUNK!!! WHAAAAMMMMMM! The sound was ear-splitting. I know, 'cuz I was holding one side of the stand to keep the gong from flying off and into the room. After all, we didn't want to injure Marian, we just wanted to get our message across.   And it did. She was a lot friendlier after she stopped shaking and crying. She even had a few laughs with us on her way to the dept head's office.   BTW, I was the only guy in the dept ever to get a date out of her. For a while there, I was on a pedestal, but then somebody remembered that I was only a piano major, so they started ignoring me again.   Gee, I wish I could go back to those days again. Wonder what ever became of Marian?   Anybody wanna hear how I made 'em roll in the aisles during graduation that year?   Sorry this is so long, but it seems appropriate to this group.   \/\/\           "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Re: Practical Jokes From: kwkeller@juno.com (KARL W KELLER) Date: Fri, 12 Sep 1997 13:21:30 EDT   Vernon - We want MORE, MORE and MORE.   Karl Musica est Dei donum optimi  
(back) Subject: Re: Conn electronic pipes From: Ron Pearcy <ronniep@clear.net.nz> Date: Fri, 12 Sep 1997 19:51:04 +0000 (GMT)     Greetings Friends,   Thanks for your posting Jan. In spite of scoffing and derision from one or two purists, the Conn Pipes or Resonators ARE effective and DO work. I know, I have owned and used sets since 1976. Some of you have as well. Further, I have designed, made and use two additional sets based on the Conn concept, using large English Goodman speaker cabinets as the basic sound output. They most certainly add an extra dimension to the sound produced normally from an organ via speaker cabinets and .. .. .. .. .. .. I would NOT be without my four units for anything! The claims made by CONN in the brochures quoted by Jan were/are in my opinion correct. Others thought so too .. .. .   see Theatre Organ Volume 18 #5 Oct/Nov 1976 p21 article by John T Tyner detailing the large Conn and pipe installation at the Timbers Supper Club Routes 151, 80 and 81 Platteville Wisconsin   see Theatre Organ Volume 21 #2 April/May 1979 p64/65 re Dave Ring Concert held in St. Hedwigs'c Cultural Centre (the old Ohio Theatre) in Toledo Further, as one can see in the two references above, an aesthetic visual component is added which complements and enhances the overall total effect and ambience being sought. I would dearly love to have a theatre or classical pipe organ in my home .. .. BUT could not afford the inherent $$$$'s, SPACE and attendant TIME (comprehensive installation with seemingly endless maintenance).   My current 4x resonator/pipe units are linked to channels #7 and #8 ex the amplified output of our Rodgers 805B. They supplement the standard six Rodgers speaker cabinets serving channels #1-#6 and add significantly to the overall effect and sound we and our friends enjoy in our home.   By the way, does anyone know whether the Timbers Supper Club is still in existence .. have often wondered.   With best wishes   Ronnie   On Fri 12 Sep, Jan Girardot wrote: > Hello Electrone Guys & Gals; just ran across a sales brochure dating back > to the > advent of the "pipes." Thought you-all would enjoy the verbiage. > > "Conn Organ Electronic Pipes. Similar to wind-blown pipes...yet > dissimilar! Basically, this exclusive Conn development functions in much > the same manner as the wind-blown pipes on a pipe organ; in both concepts > the air within each pipe must be activated before sound can be emitted. > However, while the pipes in a traditional organ are, in effect, whistles > actually producing tone, electronic pipes project tone created by the > organ's tone generators. > > Briefly, air columns, activated by the electronic drivers* beneath > the pipes, and restricted by the walls of the pipes, pump the sound into > the surrounding air. These air columns act as cushions for the powerful > tone of the organ, causing the sound to start and stop more gently than > when played through conventional speakers. > > Since each pipe is precisely cut to resonate with a particular > frequency of the organ, each tone enters the air from its own pipe **. > Consequently, the acoustical effect is comparable to that of a multi-track > stereo or the traditional organ, with sound emanating from many adjacent > sources rather than from a single speaker. > > Because Conn Electronic Pipes are properly tuned when originally > cut, they need never be tuned again. Furthermore, since the sound is > electronically produced and regulated within the organ itself, the pipes > need not be placed in a shuttered chamber to gain expression, as is > necessary with traditional pipes." > > * Dare we call them....(wait for it)..."speakers"? > > ** Now, let me see if I've got this straight: each treble set contains 49 > Pipes. The organ manual produces 85 pitches, counting 4' and 2' extensions: > something doesn't add up here. What I am > missing? > >   -- ----- Ron Pearcy <ronniep@clear.net.nz> 17 Donegal Crescent, Greenswood, Greenmeadows, Napier, New Zealand -------    
(back) Subject: This is my first posting. From: Rick Williams <Rick@netlink.nlink.com> Date: Fri, 12 Sep 1997 14:00:06 -0500   t will be appreciated. Thanks. :-)    
(back) Subject: Re: This is my first posting. From: kow987@dice.nwscc.sea06.navy.mil (Kenneth O. Woods) Date: Fri, 12 Sep 97 14:06:23 EST   First of all, I hope you never lose all your nervousness, that means you don't care enough about the results of your efforts. Second, the more you prepare, the more you will be able to perform well in spite of nervousness, so ask for the music well in advance and stick with the program for a while. Later you can have more fun with it by changing things up as you go. Thirdly and most of all, welcome! -- Kenneth O. Woods kow987@dice.crane.navy.mil  
(back) Subject: Re: Ahlborne (was UK Value of a Compton electronic) From: Bob Luderer <bobsled@nji.com> Date: Fri, 12 Sep 1997 11:40:25 -0700   john cormack wrote: > ------------------------------------------------------------------- > > I know nothing about the Compton electronic so the following may > not be applicable. I have no financial or other interest in the > Ahlborne MIDI boxes that may be a solution to the limited > sounds from the Compton (as you describe them) provided that > the Compton has MIDI capability. The Ahlborne MIDI Romantic > module provides about 20 classical organ stops allocated to > the Swell, Great, and Pedal manuals.     Anybody have more info on Ahlborne, availability in the us, maybe a URL or something????????   does it work with a MIDI keyboard or only organs?   Bobby