PipeChat Digest #77 - Friday, September 19, 1997
 
Re: Alex. Fiseisky, Russian organist
  by <WiegandCJ@aol.com>
Successful Service Playing
  by Rick Williams <Rick@netlink.nlink.com>
Re: Successful Service Playing
  by Kenneth O. Woods <kow987@dice.nwscc.sea06.navy.mil>
Re: Successful Service Playing
  by Rick Williams <Rick@netlink.nlink.com>
Russian organ music
  by Ardyth Lohuis <alohuis@saturn.vcu.edu>
organ pipe metal
  by <photom@ix.netcom.com>
This is my first posting.
  by Jason D Comet <krummhorn8@juno.com>
Re: This is my first posting.
  by Robert Ehrhardt <ehr@softdisk.com>
Re: organ pipe metal
  by <RMaryman@aol.com>
Re: Hammond Organ model H + H-100
  by <Jnordm@aol.com>
Re: The organ in St.Paul's Chapel, Columbia University, New  York.
  by Paul F. Stapel <pstapel@spectra.net>
Re: Hammond Organ model H + H-100
  by <MFulk70776@aol.com>
 


(back) Subject: Re: Alex. Fiseisky, Russian organist From: WiegandCJ@aol.com Date: Thu, 18 Sep 1997 07:44:08 -0400 (EDT)   In einer eMail vom 16.09.1997 19:54:29, schreiben Sie:   << I wonder what the piece by Alexander Glazunov is. Many years ago I heard a quite gorgeous organ piece called *Fantasy* by him, which consisted of a series of variations building to a tremendous climax. I have been looking for a recording of it ever since, and wonder if this CD has it >>   You will find it on a CD with Russian organ music, played by Boris Romanov on the Cavaille-Coll-organ of Moscow Conservatorium. It contains:   Glasunow, Alexander (1865 - 1936), Fantaisie op.110 Sabaneyev, Boris (1880 - 1918), Fugue dorienne Sabaneyev, Boris (1880 - 1918), Canzona phrygienne Odoyevsky, Vladimir (1804 - 1869), Priere sans paroles Odoyevsky, Vladimir (1804 - 1869), Musique entendue en reve Liapunov, Sergeij (1859 - 1924), Psalm 140 Butzko, Yuri (1938 -), Prelude, Dithyrambe et Postlude Zarins, Marger (1910 -), Variationen ueber B-A-C-H   Carl    
(back) Subject: Successful Service Playing From: Rick Williams <Rick@netlink.nlink.com> Date: Thu, 18 Sep 1997 08:32:32 -0500   Good morning all!   congregation launched into it about 2.5 beats slower than I had introduced it. I smiled and followed their lead.   Thanks so much for your words of encouragement and good advice. It helped tremendously.   Rick  
(back) Subject: Re: Successful Service Playing From: kow987@dice.nwscc.sea06.navy.mil (Kenneth O. Woods) Date: Thu, 18 Sep 97 9:05:40 EST   > after I played the intro, the congr> egation launched into it about 2.5 beats slower than I had introduced it. I smiled and followed their lead. > > > Rick > I never smile when they do that! I would encourage you to lead them rather than follow, this also comes after some experience and confidence becomes stronger. A lively hymn quickly becomes boring if the congregation has their way. Even though we have a song leader at each service, I force the issue on tempo. Sometimes my arms ache from dragging 200+ people along, but after several years they now realize they either keep up or listen! *grin* -- Kenneth O. Woods kow987@dice.crane.navy.mil  
(back) Subject: Re: Successful Service Playing From: Rick Williams <Rick@netlink.nlink.com> Date: Thu, 18 Sep 1997 09:18:43 -0500   I thought this may be a case of my having no idea what their preferred tempo is for that particular hymn. I dragged them along on the first hymn or we might still be there. :-)   >>> Kenneth O. Woods <kow987@dice.nwscc.sea06.navy.mil> 09/18/97 09:05AM >>> > after I played the intro, the congr> egation launched into it about 2.5 beats slower than I had introduced it. I smiled and followed their lead. > > > Rick > I never smile when they do that! I would encourage you to lead them rather than follow, this also comes after some experience and confidence becomes stronger. A lively hymn quickly becomes boring if the congregation has their way. Even though we have a song leader at each service, I force the issue on tempo. Sometimes my arms ache from dragging 200+ people along, but after several years they now realize they either keep up or listen! *grin* -- Kenneth O. Woods kow987@dice.crane.navy.mil   "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org    
(back) Subject: Russian organ music From: alohuis@saturn.vcu.edu (Ardyth Lohuis) Date: Thu, 18 Sep 1997 15:49:05 -0400   A few days ago there was a passing inquiry about Russian organ music. The curious might want to dig out the May and June, 1967 issues of "The American Organist" for some background. I know of three volumes of Soviet Organ Music (Sowjetische Orgelmusik), edited by Leonid Roismann and published by Musyka in Moscow ca. early 1970s. At least two of them are available via Interlibrary Loan. They contain works by Jermaks, Arro, Lepnurm et al. and have some brief biographical notes. It's probably hopeless to search for a purchasable copy.   For more depth, try to find "Orgelbau und Orgelmusik in Russland," ed. Hans Heinrich Eggebreche and published by Walker-Mayer in Kleinblittersdorf. Several US libraries who are ILL cooperative have copies.   "Orgelcomposition in Russland..." (2 vols, ed. Wolfgang Lindner) Eres Edition D-28859 is very difficult to find but is a real goldmine.     Ardyth Lohuis    
(back) Subject: organ pipe metal From: photom@ix.netcom.com Date: Thu, 18 Sep 1997 15:47:49 -0700   I've been reading books about organbuilding for three years and still am slightly confused about organ pipe metal. I know the common metal has 80 to 90 percent lead Spotted metal is 50% Tin And other common mixtures are 70% tin and 90% tin.   What I would like to know iis if there is any way to coll the 50% tin and lead mixture so that no spots appear? And is it possible to add any other metal to make the mixture stiffer for use with 16' pipes?   -William Catanesye  
(back) Subject: This is my first posting. From: krummhorn8@juno.com (Jason D Comet) Date: Thu, 18 Sep 1997 17:18:00 -0400   Hi Everybody, I got my first set of e-mail yesterday (9-17) and was surprised that all you people, most of you are organists, spend time with your fingers on the computer keyboard, than the console keyboards. :-)   Some of you will be glad to find out that you have another organist i the AGO. I am 14 years old. So, I've got a lot of playing ahead of me.   I read the sneezing and nose bleeding messages, and can recall some of my own personal experiences. For example, I was doing an early sunday morning Communion service, the people there don't really sing, they more or less go like this: Hymn Text, Joyful, Joyful, We Adore Thee. Congregation sings: Joy.........Ful.....Adore....of.......................................................hearts................hum, hum, hum, yawn, yawn.....................................................................................sun above. well, you get my drift. anyways, It was after the Sermon, When the pastor wa blessing the bread, I felt my nose starting to run. Sniffing didn't seem to help, So, Luckily, I had a box of tissues next to me, I just about blew my brains, than i noticed, my han dwas all blood, so, I ran of the alter, in to the bathroom, and it wouldn't stop. next thing I knew, The people were coming out of the sanctuary. They still had another Hymn, Benediction, and a Postlude to do. So all threw the next service, I had two boxes of tissues, and cotton balls stuck up my nose. And wouldn't you now, I didn't have another since that early service.   **********************   I noticed that in a vast majority of the TAO magazines, that most of the new organs are two manual organ. I practice and play a two manual C.E. Morey 1920-21(?) pipe organ. I can't find any other registrations other than the 4 or 5 I have. I have played some three manual organs, one had a lot of unification, as a mater of fact, the entire choir is unified. The pedal has two trumpets, one a startling French Trompete, and another a soft English trumpet. Another I've played, is an Austin Three Manual with a WONDERFUL layout. Of course, you sit right in between the pedal and Great divisions. I have also played a four manual Hill, Norman and Beard organ with a "Heavenly Ring" So, why can't more organs be three of more manuals. I'll need some help with designing a new three manual organ to take the place of the present two manual, 4 registration organ.   Ta, Ta for now.   Jason Krummhorn8@juno.com   Happy practicing!  
(back) Subject: Re: This is my first posting. From: Robert Ehrhardt <ehr@softdisk.com> Date: Thu, 18 Sep 1997 17:17:58 -2   Welcome, Jason! Keep the tissues handy.   There's usually just one simple answer to your question: MONEY!   -- Robert Ehrhardt <ehr@softdisk.com> Noel Memorial UMC,Shreveport, LA Sunday's Sermon:"Do You Know What Hell Is?" "Come Here Our Organist!"      
(back) Subject: Re: organ pipe metal From: RMaryman@aol.com Date: Thu, 18 Sep 1997 19:01:56 -0400 (EDT)   Actually, if you want a 50% tin/Lead somposite without the spots, and you are casting thicker sheets, make the pipes with the tick side (the side against the canvas)OUT as there is no spotting pattern on the back side of the metal sheet.   Calcium has been added to high lead content pies as an experimental hardener by some of the 'boutique' builders. the metal gets VERY hard, but suffers from metal 'memory' and usually ends up more oval than round because it tries to re-gain it's original flat shape.   A good friend of mine was the pipeshop foreman at a nationally respected 'boutique'builder and we often discussed various types of metals. For longer resonators, where Zinc is undesrieable, COPPER is a good substitute cost-wise and strength wise. just one slight challenge - soldering copper resonators is EXTREEMELY difficult because the heat tends to 'run along' the seam so getting a good smooth and strong joint is tough even for an experienced pipe maker.   hope this helps.   Rick Maryman  
(back) Subject: Re: Hammond Organ model H + H-100 From: Jnordm@aol.com Date: Thu, 18 Sep 1997 22:04:54 -0400 (EDT)   What the heck is a Novachord? I understand that Lawrence Welk made it a part of his champange sound but I've never seen one. Please tell us more.  
(back) Subject: Re: The organ in St.Paul's Chapel, Columbia University, New York. From: "Paul F. Stapel" <pstapel@spectra.net> Date: Thu, 18 Sep 1997 22:46:49 -0400   At 06:56 PM 9/17/97 -0400, Bob Conway wrote: about info on >>Biggs playing Bach on the organ of St. Paul's Chapel, Columbia University,     Sept 18, 1997 Bob... M Searle Wright is still alive and kicking here in Binghamton (NY) and might know a lot about the Biggs recording since Wright was in charge of the chapel for a long time, I believe... his telephone is 607 723 2418 --- try later at night rather than early morning   Paul Stapel    
(back) Subject: Re: Hammond Organ model H + H-100 From: MFulk70776@aol.com Date: Thu, 18 Sep 1997 23:24:18 -0400 (EDT)   In a message dated 97-09-18 22:07:26 EDT, you write:   << What the heck is a Novachord? I understand that Lawrence Welk made it a part of his champange sound but I've never seen one. Please tell us more. >> I have no knowledge of Lawrence's ever using one. It is a 72 note synthesizer. It looks exactly like a cabinet grand, with dials above the keyboard. All tones could be susutained as in a piano, with a "damper" pedal. The attack of all notes could be varied from very sharp and percussive as on a piano to much slower than a pump organ. It had 3 vibratos. It has three "resonators" or formant filters, as well as a hi-pass and lo-pass filter. Its tone was very string-like in most positions, but in the hands of a good player could generate tones reminiscent of a celesta, and horns, and some otrher orchestral instruments. It weighed 500 lbs. It had 169 vacuum tubes. It had internal amplifiers and speakers, and could be also be plugged into any Hammond tone cabinet.