PipeChat Digest #78 - Saturday, September 20, 1997
 
Re: organ pipe metal
  by Timothy Patterson <timp@usinternet.com>
Plagues
  by Paul Opel <popel@sover.net>
A reminder that #Pipechat IRC is on tonight.
  by Bob Conway <conwayb@post.queensu.ca>
Detatched consoles
  by Jason D Comet <krummhorn8@juno.com>
Re: Welcome
  by Jason D Comet <krummhorn8@juno.com>
Re: Welcome
  by Jason D Comet <krummhorn8@juno.com>
Re: organ pipe metal
  by Bob, Diane & Jeff Kinner <rkinner@one.net>
Re: Plagues
  by John L. Speller <jlspeller@stlnet.com>
Trinity Episcopal Church, Watertown (was Re: Welcome)
  by John L. Speller <jlspeller@stlnet.com>
Re: organ pipe metal
  by Ken <mewzishn@spec.net>
Re: Detatched consoles
  by Otto Pebworth <opebwrth@gte.net>
Re: Detatched consoles - Grace OTH-A update
  by Nelson and Tracy Denton <ndenton434@bigwave.ca>
Off-Topic :  Things to do while the glue dries on the bellows  your relea
  by Nelson and Tracy Denton <ndenton434@bigwave.ca>
 


(back) Subject: Re: organ pipe metal From: Timothy Patterson <timp@usinternet.com> Date: Thu, 18 Sep 1997 23:06:10 -0500   At 07:01 PM 9/18/97 -0400, you wrote:   >A good friend of mine was the pipeshop foreman at a nationally respected >'boutique'builder and we often discussed various types of metals. For longer >resonators, where Zinc is undesrieable, COPPER is a good substitute cost-wise >and strength wise. just one slight challenge - soldering copper resonators is >EXTREEMELY difficult because the heat tends to 'run along' the seam so >getting a good smooth and strong joint is tough even for an experienced pipe >maker. > >hope this helps. > >Rick Maryman Try TIG welding it.   tim patterson    
(back) Subject: Plagues From: popel@sover.net (Paul Opel) Date: Fri, 19 Sep 1997 08:32:32 -0400   If you're as easily amused as I, read on...   I recently got a fund-raising appeal from Trinity UMC in Farmington, ME, raising funds for restoring their organ. In it, it says   <The names of those who give $5,000 or more will be listed on a handsome plague plainly displayed near the newly installed organ. >   Oooh- can I get the one with frogs? I always kind of liked them...     Paul Opel      
(back) Subject: A reminder that #Pipechat IRC is on tonight. From: Bob Conway <conwayb@post.queensu.ca> Date: Fri, 19 Sep 1997 11:53:33 -0400   To all Pipechat-L members:   #Pipechat IRC will be on again this evening.   On Anothernet at 9.00 pm EDT on the following Servers:   together.vt.us.another.net neato.ca.us.another.net   Or, you can try: irc.another.net. That will randomly choose an open server for you.   Hope to see you there this evening.       Bob ...   When you are forty, half of you belongs to the past... And when you are seventy, nearly all of you.   To be 70 years young is sometimes far more hopeful than to be 40 years old.          
(back) Subject: Detatched consoles From: krummhorn8@juno.com (Jason D Comet) Date: Fri, 19 Sep 1997 16:29:27 -0400   I haven't played many movable consoles, but want one installed in the auditorium of my school. I've thought about many different kinds of linkage from console to pipes. Fiber optics, traditional Wire/Conduit, Computer scrambler through cable to Competer descrambler, and all the other ones that may exist. But, I was thinking. If this organ is going to accop. School productions, concerts, and all other possible preformances, I don't want people to be tripping over cords, Conduit, etc.... So, I was Thinking, Do they have a radio frequency linkage????????????? You have a computer that scrambles up signals, from the key switch, sends the computer signal to a radio transmitter, the radio frequency carries the signal to a radio reciever, another computer descrambles the signal, send a current to a relay, which activates the pallet. This would handle the stop action, key action, and blower switch. If you could have the console plug into a standard 120 volt outlet, you coud have the console virtually any place ing the room. Maybe even outside!!!!!! Thats something to think about.   *************************** Keep practicing. I have two services this sunday (9/21) and haven't practiced since school started, (about 4 weeks.)   Jason Krummhorn8@juno.com Private mail accepted.  
(back) Subject: Re: Welcome From: krummhorn8@juno.com (Jason D Comet) Date: Fri, 19 Sep 1997 15:38:51 -0400       > >One thing you did not tell us in your interesting posting is where you >live. >I would be interested in knowing which four-manual Hill, Norman, and >Beard >you played - here or in England? Kingston, Ontario, perhaps? > >Let us know. > >Malcolm Wechsler     *********** Well, Malcolm, The glorious four manual insturment is housed in Trinity Episc. in Watertown,NY. I take lessons on this insturment, and the house organist is Susan Maxwell, a very dear friend of mine. It is perfect for playing Widor's Toccata from symphony #5or6 (which over it is)   The fourth manual is house over your right ear. The rest of the organ (choir, great, swell, pedal) is housed on the other other side of the chancel. The Great is mostly expossed on the side facing you. You face the congregation, but the console is so high, Shaq. O'Neil wouldn't be able to be seen. (I don't like sports, so I don't know how to spell it) The console is detached and it looks like the console of the Coral Ridge pres. Church in Ft. Laterdale Fl. or the Crystal Cathedral in Garden Grove Ca. No, I haven't played them. The four manual organ is so hard to register with the solo playing the melody, because the solo is on a higher wind pressure than the main organ. Not to mension, that the Solo only has a Rohr Flute 8', Kopple Flute 4', Principal 4', Spitz Flote 2', Cymbal III, Sesquiltera (?) II. You can see every pipe from the console. It was elegently placed in the doorway (which had no door) going into the baptistry. I think I better stop now, before I get carried away.   Until Next Time, Jason      
(back) Subject: Re: Welcome From: krummhorn8@juno.com (Jason D Comet) Date: Fri, 19 Sep 1997 16:31:02 -0400     On Thu, 18 Sep 1997 20:43:18 -0400 cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) writes: >Welcome to the list Jason. It seems that we are distantly "related" >(since the krummhorns and cremonas are cousins). I think the reason >that so many organs are two manual now is that organs have gotten so >expensive and at the same time organ builders and organists have >learned >that pedal departments need pipes, too. Thirty years ago, many three >manual organs of 25 to 30 stops had maybe one rank in the pedal and >everything else was extended or borrowed. The organ I play is 16 >ranks, unified to about 40 stops, and has only one rank in the pedal >(16 >Bourdon) out of nine stops. If you send me the stoplist of your >organ, >I'll be glad to help you find some more registrations possibilities. >It is good that you get to play on several different organs. Where >are >you located; I'm in Gainesville, Florida. I can identify with your >nosebleed story; I used to have them myself and played many a service >with cotton in my nose (makes it difficult to sing along with the >hymns! >-- "hody, hody, hoooooooody, Lord Dod ommiddy" I try to practice >three >or four hours a day, but can't in the summer because the church is too >hot. And, for the past several weeks I have been doing some work on >the organ I play. It's fun, but I would rather have an organ that >worked well so that I could just practice and perform. What >literature >are you playing. I hope to chat with you soon. Best regards, >bruce > >Bruce Cornely, organist (OHS & AGO) >University United Methodist Church > and Student Center Wicks ('56) 3/16r Gainesville >Florida >Dean, Gainesville Chapter AGO     ********************** Bruce-   I don't really sing during Hymns, I can't concentrate on the music I play, and sing also.   Here is my Stoplist for my dear:   Gt.: 8' Open Diapason (loud and recuse(?) without 4' coupler. louder than my entire hymn registration It would be better if it wasn't even instaled) 8' Stopped Diapason 8' Dulciana 4' Octave (same as 8' open, but is OKay if used with no gt 4' coupler and with mixture. I use that for either really big hymns, or when the church is full,( 150 or more)) 2' Dulcet Gt. to Gt. 4' Coupler Sw 16 sw 8 Sw 4   Sw.: 8' Hohl Flute 8' Salicional 8' Celeste (TC) 4' Fugara Mixture II (no breaks) 8' Trumpet (perfect for a solo stop with 8' stopped dia. & Dulciana accomp. (occationally with 2' fugue style accomp.)) Sw. to Sw. 16 & 8'   Pedal: 16' Bourdon 8' Flute (ext bourdon) 4' Fifteenth Gt 8' Sw 8'   Bourdon/Flute has had it. They aren't winded or placed properly. They are not good for anything except Hymns. Even then, the Bourdon doesn't "rumble" like it should. I'm thinking on adding a Leiblickgedeckt 16 & 8' Getting new Bourdons, and maybe a 16' Principle (elec. possibly) I have a complete new organ scheme planned, now all we need is the money.   >  
(back) Subject: Re: organ pipe metal From: "Bob, Diane & Jeff Kinner" <rkinner@one.net> Date: Fri, 19 Sep 1997 16:37:59 -0400   William, I'm not an organ builder, but 80-90% lead content doesn't seem right to me. A pipe with that much lead would be so soft as to collapse under its own weight. I'm not sure what an upper limit is on lead, but that seems high. Is that right, anyone? Bob  
(back) Subject: Re: Plagues From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com> Date: Fri, 19 Sep 1997 16:52:59 -0500 (CDT)   At 08:32 AM 9/19/97 -0400, Paul Opel wrote:   >I recently got a fund-raising appeal from Trinity UMC in Farmington, ME, >raising funds for restoring their organ. In it, it says > ><The names of those who give $5,000 or more will be listed on a handsome >plague plainly displayed near the newly installed organ. > > >Oooh- can I get the one with frogs? I always kind of liked them...   Perhaps the handsome plague will be used for playing plagal cadences :-)   John    
(back) Subject: Trinity Episcopal Church, Watertown (was Re: Welcome) From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com> Date: Fri, 19 Sep 1997 16:53:02 -0500 (CDT)   At 03:38 PM 9/19/97 -0400, Jason wrote:   >The glorious four manual insturment is housed in Trinity Episc. in >Watertown,NY. I take lessons on this insturment, and the house organist >is Susan Maxwell, a very dear friend of mine.   >The fourth manual is house over your right ear. The rest of the organ >(choir, great, swell, pedal) is housed on the other other side of the >chancel. The Great is mostly expossed on the side facing you. You face >the congregation, but the console is so high, Shaq. O'Neil wouldn't be >able to be seen.   This was actually a 1970 rebuild by Hill, Norman & Beard of Skinner Op. 457 of 1924. The Skinner chests were releathered, fitted with new magnets and retained, and about half the pipework was reused. The new main case designed by Herbert Norman projects a couple of feet into the chancel and was designed to bring the Great chorus more out into the chancel. There was an entirely new Positiv division opposite the main organ on a flower box above the console.   John    
(back) Subject: Re: organ pipe metal From: Ken <mewzishn@spec.net> Date: Fri, 19 Sep 1997 18:17:34 +0000   Bob, Diane & Jeff Kinner wrote:   > I'm not an organ builder, but 80-90% lead content doesn't seem right > > to me. A pipe with that much lead would be so soft as to collapse > under > its own weight. I'm not sure what an upper limit is on lead, but that > > seems high. Is that right, anyone?   I've played a number of instruments with pipes of as much as 98% lead. Quite a rich, singing sound.   Ken Sybesma        
(back) Subject: Re: Detatched consoles From: Otto Pebworth <opebwrth@gte.net> Date: Fri, 19 Sep 1997 21:41:22 -0500   You'd still have to have a power source to the console no matter what the remote-control system utilized; hence, a small cable for the multiplexed system run along with the power cord wouldn't be that bad.   Otto  
(back) Subject: Re: Detatched consoles - Grace OTH-A update From: Nelson and Tracy Denton <ndenton434@bigwave.ca> Date: Sat, 20 Sep 1997 00:57:10   At 04:29 PM 9/19/97 -0400, you wrote: about detached consoles. . .   I am currently working on the same situation in Grace on the Hill, Anglican, Toronto. A 3 manual console hooked to a 54 rank 1928 Casavant organ. The organists desire a movable console that will be able to be plugged into several different locations. I have decided to use a Peterson Orga-Plex switching system ( http://www.petersonemp.com - full descriptions available on line plus they have full service/installation manuals online and a 1-800 number - What more could you ask for) This system uses a computer printer cable to link the console to the organ. In this case I installed 4 outlets in various locations around the Chancel to allow the organist to hook up the console at any place in the Chancel in a couple of minutes without tools. The main cable consists of a computer printer cable, a 12 volt cable and plug and a 120 volt cable and plug. The entire system can be plugged into floor mounted recepticles that are covered when not in use. The hookup is very easy and hopefully "idiot proof" 3 plugs all different - just plug them in (yea right, we're dealing with organists here eh? :-))))))) I just got the sytem working for the first time yesterday without any problems. The cable will be designed to slide back into the organ console platform when the full 15' length is not required. This will prevent the trip hazard a long cable would cause. The cost of the additional outlets was just a few hundred dollars in material and labour. I would recomend this type of layout to anyone who expects to have a moving console.   Other well known and respected companies make similar systems and some have already experimented with radio and infared controls. (I've used Peterson sytems for over 15 years without any major complaints) I don't know the pro's and cons of such methods but I would be concerned about interferance with other electrical systems in an auditorium. you don't want an organ to suddenly cypher on every note everytime someone's cellular phone rang would you? The 3 cables are just as easy to install as a single 120 volt plug would be and you would require that for the console power and lighting. Many stages have basements under them and/or extra conduits for cables to run around in. thus it would not be a problem to install a "land line" system.         P. S. Grace update! ( funny the architect is also named Grace)   Due to a major time shortage ( I'm very busy and the church was closed for major renovations and called us in very late) we decided to do the organ renovations in two stages.   Stage one.   The entire organ was covered by plastic for the renovations.   The ornate console shell ( Casavant consoles have a fully detachable outer shell) was refinished - by my sister Janine and it will be used over again as the new console shell. The new Orga-Plex system was installed hooked to the old console key contacts. ( bypassing the old electro-pneumatic system)   The organ chamber wiring/switching was transferred to the new Orga-Plex system.   Stage Two The entire console interior will be replaced with all new hardware. ( frame, keyboards, pedalboard, wing terraces, drawknobs action etc.)starting next year. - At least I'll get to do most of the work in the shop and not have to drive along the "Worlds Largest and Longest (occasionally moving) Parking Lot" - Hwy 401 every day. 16+ lanes of stalled cars and trucks and road repairs :-((((   I hate "T'ron-nah" (local pronuciation of Toronto)     P.P.S. For those familiar with this church, the renovations are proceeding well. The entire floor/carpeting of the church has been covered with 3/4" oak flooring and the church has been completly painted. The reverberation is now a full 3+ seconds up from 0 seconds - don't sneeze in here folks!!! It sounds like a cannon being fired.   The organ still suffers from being bottled up by a heavy oak casework and a mass of big display pipes, but we are working on adding some grill cloth and removing some of the paneling on the casework to allow more sound out. And reconnecting the 16' Gt/Ped Open Diapason Display pipes   Now if we can only do something about that 1960's Phelps style 16' Great/Pedal Quintaton "Wimptaton" :-(((((   P.P.S. To all our beloved customers out there. . . ( And my beloved wife Tracy who never see's me any more)   WE ARE STILL WORKING ON YOUR PROJECTS AS WELL!!!! KEEP THE FAITH WE'RE GOING AS FAST AS WE CAN!!!   Fun? WOW!!!   Yea right ;-((( I need some sleep. Nelson E. Denton R. A. Denton and Son Pipe Organ Builders Hamilton Ontario Canada  
(back) Subject: Off-Topic : Things to do while the glue dries on the bellows your releathering From: Nelson and Tracy Denton <ndenton434@bigwave.ca> Date: Sat, 20 Sep 1997 01:22:35   Some funnies from "Lori" on the "Depression List"   Something to do when. . . . >> "30 WAYS TO HANDLE STRESS" >> >> >> 1. Jam 39 tiny marshmallows up your nose and try to sneeze them out. >> 2. Use your Mastercard to pay your Visa. >> 3. Pop some popcorn without putting the lid on. >> 4. When someone says "have a nice day" tell them you have other plans. >> 5. Find out what a frog in a blender really looks like. >> 6. Forget the Diet Center and send yourself a candygram. >> 7. Make a list of things that you've already done. >> 8. Dance naked in front of your pets. >> 9. Put your toddler's clothes on backwards and send them off to >> preschool as if nothing >> was wrong. >> 10. Retaliate for tax woes by filling out your tax forms with Roman >> numerals. >> 11. Tattoo "out to lunch" on your forehead. >> 12. Tape pictures of your boss on watermelons and launch them from high >> places. >> 13. Leaf through National Geographic and draw underwear on the natives. >> 14. Go shopping. Buy everything. Sweat in it. Return it the next day. >> 15. Buy a subscription to Sleezoid Weekly and send it to your boss' >> wife. >> 16. Pay your electric bill in pennies. >> 17. Drive to work in reverse. >> 18. Relax by mentally reflecting on your favorite episode of the >> "Flintstones" during that >> important finance meeting. >> 19. Sit naked on a shelled hard-boiled egg. >> 20. Refresh yourself. Put your tongue on a cold steel guardrail. >> 21. Tell your boss to blow it out of his toupe and let him figure it >> out. >> 22. Polish your car with ear wax. >> 23. Read the dictionary upside down and look for secret messages. >> 24. Start a nasty rumor and see if you recognize it when it comes back >> to you. >> 25. Bill your doctor for the time spent in his waiting room. >> 26. Braid the hairs in each nostril. >> 27. Write a short story using alphabet soup. >> 28. Lie on your back eating celery....using your navel as a salt dipper. >> >> 29. Stare at people through the lines of a fork and pretend they're in >> jail. >> 30. Make up a language and ask people for directions vW/{KoY(d[WkY--   Try subsituting the words Minister, Organist, Caretaker, Organbuilder, Toaster, for "boss" etc. Nothing Organic here but I thought since it was Friday. . . :-)))))   Have a nice weekend folks Nelson E. Denton R. A. Denton and Son Pipe Organ Builders Hamilton Ontario Canada