PipeChat Digest #89 - Tuesday, September 30, 1997
 
Re: Out of place (Organs in apartments)
  by Zinger <dandub@gte.net>
Hammond Info
  by Michael Murray <murray@felis.wildlife.uidaho.edu>
New Music for Trumpet and Organ - Oct 5th
  by Patricia R. Maimone <patmai@juno.com>
Bottle Dump Stop?
  by Richard Schneider <arpncorn@dave-world.net>
Re: An addition to the Townhouse discussion
  by Otto Pebworth <opebwrth@gte.net>
Re:  '97 ATOS Convention
  by Jeff Taylor <jctaylor@execpc.com>
Re: Bottle Dump Stop?
  by John L. Speller <jlspeller@stlnet.com>
Re: How Should We Critique
  by Shirley <pnst@itw.com>
Re: Out of place
  by Shirley <pnst@itw.com>
Old Music Books
  by Vernon Moeller <vernonm@ccsi.com>
Re: Bottle Dump Stop?
  by Otto Pebworth <opebwrth@gte.net>
Re: Out of place
  by Zinger <dandub@gte.net>
Re: Bottle Dump Stop?
  by Zinger <dandub@gte.net>
Re: Out of place
  by <PAULMACVEY@delphi.com>
Re: Concert Announcement
  by <MWORGLBAU@aol.com>
Re: Out of place
  by bruce cornely <cremona84000@webtv.net>
Re: Old Music Books
  by bruce cornely <cremona84000@webtv.net>
 


(back) Subject: Re: Out of place (Organs in apartments) From: Zinger <dandub@gte.net> Date: Mon, 29 Sep 1997 12:50:27   On 29-Sep-97, Bob Conway wrote: >>The Clavinova has a headphone jack so the person can play and >>hear everything fine, but no sound goes out into the room. All >>modern electronics organs have, to the best of my knowledge, >>a headphone jack also. That should solve the neighbor problem. >> >>Jack Cormack >>Potomac, MD   >John, et al,   >Of course you are right, but it just isn't the same! IMHO >Bob Conway <conwayb@post.queensu.ca> >Organic DeeJay Emeritus, - but back in the saddle for this Session! >CFRC-FM 101.9 MHz >Radio Queen's University >Kingston, Ontario, K7L 3N6 >CANADA     >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org   ------------------------------------------------------------------------- Listers.....   I don't know about the Clavinova, however, when I had my Rodgers 333 (a 20 year old analog instrument) I would've agreed whole heartedly. It sounded awful in the headphones.   Now that I have my Allen 317 I couldn't disagree more. Granted it ain't cheap......when I got my 317 it didn't have headphones. Now it seemed to me that an organ that one spends what one spends on a 3 manual Allen, that it should have a headphone jack. It didn't. I talked to my Allen dealer and found out that the circuit board, accompanying amplifier, cables, hookups, etc. would cost me about $400. And let me tell you, it was well worth it.   Not only do the headphones allow sanity to be maintained in the house with two organists, but the headphones we installed (yes we did it ourselves thereby avoiding another $100 for the Allen tech to come out and do it) sound soooo good you don't even really mind having them on. Especially now with the new reverb units (Alesis MicroVerbs -- 2 of them) installed. The reverb works wonderfully with the headphones.   Anyway....with my 317 I don't mind the headphones at all! Except for the obvious amount of weight on my head and when it's warm in the house, the headphones make my ears very hot! Dan Wilkinson DanDub@GTE.net    
(back) Subject: Hammond Info From: murray@felis.wildlife.uidaho.edu (Michael Murray) Date: Mon, 29 Sep 1997 15:24:45 -0700   My university is trying to sell a Hammond E-1000 (E-100?) Organ. With my limited funds, I've resisted buying it, however, nobody else has expressed any interest. My question: does anybody know anything about this organ? Is this a potential investment? I think they were made during the late 60's. It's good-fair condition and they're asking $400.   Thanks for any answers/comments, Michael Murray Moscow, Idaho  
(back) Subject: New Music for Trumpet and Organ - Oct 5th From: patmai@juno.com (Patricia R. Maimone) Date: Mon, 29 Sep 1997 18:16:07 -0400   Hello, PIPECHATTERS!   It is not often that one has the opportunity to play some new music, indeed a premiere or two, with an outstanding young trumpeter who studied with the composer. In addition, the composer will participate as narrator.   Following is the (almost) unexpurgated publicity from the USMA Band   about the Chamber Music concert this coming Sunday at the Cadet Chapel, West Point. I must confess that I added an "h" to the word "is" on the last line.   Hope that some of you can attend, or send colleagues, former students, family, friends. Please come up to the console after the concert and introduce yourself.   Pat Maimone   Subject: Chamber Series, Oct 5th Original-Date: Mon Sep 29 09:58:37 1997 Original-From: yd1981 (Trefethen Donald SSG)   United States Military Academy Band West Point, New York     /- /- /- /- /- - - - - - - - -\ -\ -\ -\ -\ / \ E C C L E S I A S T I C T R U M P E T A N D O R G A N \ / \- \- \- \- \- - - - - - - - -/ -/ -/ -/ -/     Ecclesiastic Music for Trumpet and Organ will be the next concert in the United States Military Academy Chamber Music Series. Sergeant First Class Gregory Alley will perform with organist Patricia Maimone at the West Point Cadet Chapel on Sunday, October 5th at 3:00 p.m. The concert is free and open to the public.   This event will feature sacred music and hymn settings from a broad ecumenical base, including Judaism. The arrangements, based on sacred music and texts from the 13th to the 20th centuries, were done by Dr. Paul Willwerth, Professor Emeritus of Trumpet at Central Michigan University. Dr. Willwerth, a member of the Military Academy Band 1954-56, was the first recipient of the Doctor of Musical Arts degree from the University of Michigan. Dr. Willwerth will be in attendance, providing textual narrative prior to each work.   The concert opens with the Shaker melody Lord, Give Me of Thy Living Bread; and continues with Franz Tunder's Wachet auf; and an early American spiritual, I Will Arise. Three of Dr. Willwerth's compositions will be performed, including Attende, Domine (Hear Us, O Lord); Credo, from the Nicene Creed; and the world premiere of Christ ist erstanden. Wash Me Throughly and the Voluntary, Alleluia, both by Samuel Wesley, will precede Rachmaninoff's Gloria from Liturgy for St. John Chrysostom. The recital will conclude with the Hebrew melody Adon Olam (The Lord of All).   "It is out of my sincere appreciation to Dr. Willwerth for the years he spent as my trumpet teacher that I reciprocate by performing an entire concert of his beautiful sacred compositions," notes Sergeant First Class Alley.   For concert information, cancellations and updates call the Academy Band 24 hour concert information line at (914) 938-2617.   All concerts by the U.S. Military Academy Band are free and open to the public.   Trefethen Donald SSG <yd1981@staff>    
(back) Subject: Bottle Dump Stop? From: Richard Schneider <arpncorn@dave-world.net> Date: Mon, 29 Sep 1997 18:14:14 -0700   John Speller Wrote:   > The most spectacular sound I ever recall hearing along these lines was > when I was at school in England and someone accidentally dropped a > crate of empty milk-bottles down a long flight of concrete stairs.   > I wonder if anyone ever thought of a Bottle Dump stop on theatre > organs. I guess you would have to install new bottles each time you > used it, but it would probably be worth the effort.   Dear John and listers:   Actually, there's an easier way, and a lot more cost-efficient! Install a 1960's Schlicker Zimbel Mixure and introduce it over Full Organ, and you've got it!!   I've worked on enough of them to attest that they really do sound like crashing glass!   Faithfully, -- / ^ ^ \ { (O) (O) } --------oOOOo--------U-------oOOOo------------   "Arp in the Corn Patch"   EMAIL: mailto:arpncorn@dave-world.net  
(back) Subject: Re: An addition to the Townhouse discussion From: Otto Pebworth <opebwrth@gte.net> Date: Mon, 29 Sep 1997 19:26:33 -0400   Hmmm...sounds like a few mixtures I've had to endure (both playing AND tuning!)  
(back) Subject: Re: '97 ATOS Convention From: "Jeff Taylor" <jctaylor@execpc.com> Date: Mon, 29 Sep 1997 19:56:13 -0500   OK, since nobody else has responded, I guess I'll crawl out of my lurker's closet for a while and relate my impressions.   I live near Milwaukee WI, about a 5 hour drive from Indianapolis. Initially, I wasn't going to attend this year, but the offer of a ride from a friend changed my mind. For some reason, I didn't find the venues, as advertized, very interesting. I was mistaken. Generally they were very fine organs in top condition. Everyone involved in their preparation as well as in 'organizing' the convention deserves our thanks and congratulations.   I'll run thru the schedule and give my recollections. Most, but not all of my comments will be positive. I don't want to offend anyone but I don't want to give false praise. These are my opinions only. Others will disagree, so please your throw in your comments too. Here goes...   Saturday evening, 7/12   Ron Rhode, Warren Performing Arts Center, 3/18 Barton: The Warren Center is a fairly new high school auditorium seating 1200. The organ was from the Indianna Theatre, with some modifications; a very nice instrument. Ron is a good organist and a regular at the ATOS conventions. Unfortunately, he seemed unprepared for this program. He seemed to have particular trouble with registration changes. There were some noticable pauses in the music while he groped for the stops he wanted. He commented at one point that he had changed his program because the instrument turned out to be better than he expected. Sunday afternoon, 7/13 Lee Erwin, Long Center for the Performing Arts, Lafayette, 3/21 Wurlitzer: Unfortunately, this program was pretty much a disaster. Lee was supposed to accompany a silent film, however the projector failed so the film couldn't be shown. The Lee played the theme that he composed for the film (a delightful little melody) and played an inpromptu concert, paging through some music he brought along. His many years of experience and professionalism were apparent as he kept the show going and seemed to enjoy doing it. Ken Double, the m.c. interviewed Lee about his experiences in the silent film era and in radio to fill time.   Ken Double and the Lafayette Citizens Band, Long Center: This program was roughly split between Ken playing organ solos and playing with the band. The program was very successful. I had not heard Ken before. He did a very fine job and worked very well with the band. I've heard other organ/band combinations that were not as successful.   Monday Morning, 7/14 Jelani Eddington, Emmerich Manual High School, 3/26 Wurlitzer: Aside from the stifling heat (this was the only non-air conditioned venue at the convention) this was an excellent program. I had not heard Jelani play for about four years. His playing has matured. I continue to be impressed by the thoughtfulness, thoroughness and sensitivity of his arangements. He did a very fine job.   Monday Afternoon   Donna Parker/Jonas Nordwall Rodgers demo, Indianapolis Artsgarden: The Artsgarden is a large glass atrium in a mall and skywalk system in downtown Indy. Rodgers had set up one of their new theatre models and a 'straight' organ. Donna played a few numbers on the theatre organ and then was joined by Jonas and another young man who's name I don't recall right now. In the extremely live accoustics of the space, the theatre organ sounded quite convincing at times. When the other two joined her, they did more rock-style stuff with the straight organ taking on the role of a percussion section. It was a really impressive effect, especially in that space. Unfortunately, it was not a good demonstration of the instruments as organs. Walter Strony, Hedback Community Theatre, 2/11 Page/Wurlitzer: The Hedback is a small theatre used by a local musical-comedy group. As was discussed some time ago on this list, one of the tests of a real master is the ability to present a musical, varied and exciting program on a small instrument; and that's what Walt did. Not only did he meet the challenge musically, but he also demonstrated his sense of humor by using the stage set for his entrance and exit. He's a real pro! Monday Evening   Dwight Thomas, Warren Performing Arts Center: Dwight is a fine young organist. Personally, I thought he had some very pleasing moments in his program, but overall, I didn't 'connect' with this program as well as with some of the others. IMHO, I felt that he tried a little too hard to include unknown music in his program. Don't get me wrong, I strongly believe that organists should expand their reperatoir beyond the old standards. However, I also think that some of the unknown music is unknown for a good reason: it's not always very interesting.   Tuesday Morning, 7/15   Clark Wilson, Paramount Theatre, Anderson IN, 3/12 Page: The Anderson Paramount is a delightful little theatre. It's not grand, but it is beautifully detailed and immaculately restored - a real gem! Clark had just completed tonal finishing on this fine instrument. It sounded great. As usual, Clark presented a very enjoyable program in his bright, breezy, very musical style.   Tuesday Afternoon   John Giacci, Embassy Theatre, Fort Wayne, IN, 3/16 Page: John is a young Austrailian organist who shows lots of promis. He gave a very agile performance, using the Page to its fullest and demonstrated a delightful, subtle wit in some of his commentary. IMHO, he was a little too heavy-handed with the post horn 'jabs'. The program was made up almost entirely of unfamiliar music, much of it, as I recall, from Austrailia.   Tuesday Evening   Simon Gledhill, Embassy Theatre: IMHO, this program was worth the entire expense of the convention. Simon gave a stunning performance, like nothing I've heard before, either live or on a recording. The program was perfectly balanced between old t.o. standards, newer music (including a superb Beatles medly), and more obscure British music; and between lovely, quiet pieces and some hair-raising jazz. The Page responded superbly. At one point, Simon pointed out that with an instrument as good as this one, you don't really need any more than 16 ranks. By the end of the program, I was both exhausted and energized. It was an amazing experience!   Wednesday Morning, 7/16   The young organists program was presented at Emmerich Manual High School. Some friends and I decided that we could not subject ourselves to the heat again, so we took a tour of the Scottish Rite Cathedral in Indianapolis. It is a gorgeous building from the 1920's with many beautiful stained glass windows depicting the various levels and virtues of Masonry and some very fine woodwork. We were joined by a couple of other convention people. When we mentioned that we were from the organ convention, the staff opened up the console of the 5 manual Skinner in the main auditorium. Yours truly and another in our group embarassed ourselves on the instrument for a few minutes. Was great fun! The instrument seemed in generally good condition, although a few things weren't working. At least from the vantage point of the console, full organ didn't seem to fill the auditorium in a really satisfying way. Although I may have been suffering a slight hearing loss after all of the t.o. music :-) !   Unfortunately, we had to leave on Wednesday, so I couldn't attend the afterglow at the Wehmeier residence on Thursday. I have Barry Baker's fine recording on the instrument. It sounds a lot like the organ George Wright used for most of his Dot label recordings. Larry, if you are a true theatre organ enthusiast, I'd highly recommend that you attend an ATOS convention. Not only do you get to attend several days of theatre organ programs, you get to do it with around 700 others who share your interest. In addition to the musical programs, there is a great record shop, electronic organ displays (Rodgers and Allen this year) and a fascinating display of hundreds of different organ clubs and restoration projects and various workshops, interest group meetings and a banquet (none of which I attended this year). I have already reserved my vacation time for next year's convention in San Francisco. One of my fears is that, given the age of many of the people who attend the conventions, we may not have this opportunity for too many more years, so take advantage of it while you can! --------- > From: Lawrence W Nevel <lnwbpa@sunlink.net> > To: Pipechat <pipechat@pipechat.org> > Subject: '97 ATOS Convention > Date: Thursday, August 28, 1997 5:30 PM > > Dear Readers, > I will ask this again. Did anyone attend the ATOS convention this > summer. I would love to hear any personal comments on what you > observed/heard. I have never been to one and would like to attend one > someday but as of now, being a home-owner with work needing to be done, > I have not had the bucks to attend a convention. It may be several > months until the Theatre Organ magazine runs the details. How about > it? Did anyone attend and care to share their experiences? Please, > I'm not looking for any flaming! > Thanks, > Larry > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >  
(back) Subject: Re: Bottle Dump Stop? From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com> Date: Mon, 29 Sep 1997 20:29:43 -0500 (CDT)   At 06:14 PM 9/29/97 -0700, Rich Schneider wrote: Install >a 1960's Schlicker Zimbel Mixure and introduce it over Full Organ, and >you've got it!!   >I've worked on enough of them to attest that they really do sound like >crashing glass!   Not so much crashing glass as Baroque'n glass, I would say :-)   John.        
(back) Subject: Re: How Should We Critique From: Shirley <pnst@itw.com> Date: Mon, 29 Sep 1997 21:06:58   At 13:50 09/29/97 +0100, you wrote: >Couldn't put it better! Let's hear the instrument - All of it, including >warts! > >Richard Scott-Copeland >     Heh.   I just this morning practiced with Glenn Miller for his recital on Friday evening at Abington Presbyterian Church (8 pm, if you didn't see the announcement). (I'm the page-turner, stop-adder, and extra pair of ears.)   I was commenting to Glenn how much of the organ is lost out in the nave. He added a couple of the mixtures for me to hear *why* it sounded so much less brilliant.... he's not using them... not until they can be tuned, IF they can be tuned. They sound horrid.   His recital program was chosen to show off both himself AND the organ, which is as it should be. He has found some *wonnnnnnnderful* combinations on the Moller, some I'd never heard before. His program ranges from the baroque to romantic/contemporary French, and his registrations reflect the literature perfectly. There is one piece that is positively beautiful that uses the Dolzflote and its celeste with a lovely flute against it. There is another that uses the Krummhorn and the smaller trumpet. There are the quiet, and there are the bombastic.   The audience at this recital will indeed hear all the organ, except maybe for the out-of-tune mixtures, used in a well-selected program. Wish you could be here in the Northeast, Bruce! You'd like this one, I think.   --Shirley  
(back) Subject: Re: Out of place From: Shirley <pnst@itw.com> Date: Mon, 29 Sep 1997 21:53:35   At 08:30 09/29/97, you wrote:   >P.S. >In fact several of the neighbors stop by and make requests, and to my surprise >the requests are NOT to stop playing....in fact one woman wants to know when >I'm going to have the speakers installed in her house...... > >Dan   I grew up in a twin house with a Hammond C2 with Leslie. The house was built in the '40s at the latest, the '20s at the earliest. The organ and speaker sat against the outside wall, not the party wall.   I'll never forget the pounding on the party wall one time when I was practicing particularly loudly, a theatre organ piece to be performed on the Lansdowne Theatre's 3/8 Kimball. Thinking the neighbor was trying to tell me something, I turned off the instrument immediately. It wasn't till days later when she told me she was trying to tell me to play louder, that she liked that particular piece!   My husband lived in a rowhouse in Philadelphia, first with a console-sized Gulbransen, and then with a Conn 651 and two pipe speaker units. A rowhouse in this city is the equivalent to a townhouse. The neighbors, while not always enjoying the music emanating from that house (my husband, his brother, and his father all played), they rather tolerated it. Then again, this was also back in the '60s when the home-organ industry was booming.   I think the message here is that, no matter what the "soundproofing" conditions, no matter what, you need tolerant neighbors... and a corner unit. :)   --Shirley      
(back) Subject: Old Music Books From: Vernon Moeller <vernonm@ccsi.com> Date: Sun, 28 Sep 1997 10:23:15   Sometime ago, when I first joined the other organ list, they were just finishing discussing how best to take care of old organ music.   Currently, when I work on an organ piece, I copy it so that my notes are on pieces of paper rather than in my books, plus my books don't wear out as soon. I'm not really interested in changing my methods regarding such books.   What I want to know is how to take care of books of music that are falling apart. I have some organ music, mostly anthologies, that are nearly 30 years old. I'm tempted to take them to my agency's print shop and have them drill holes in them and keep them in 3-ring loose-leaf binders (I'd have to remove the staples first, of course). Has anybody done this? How does it work out?   I'm tempted to copy all those books and keep the copies in loose-leaf binders, but I don't know if that's the best idea or not.   Anybody got good methods or ideas?   Thanks!   \/\/\    
(back) Subject: Re: Bottle Dump Stop? From: Otto Pebworth <opebwrth@gte.net> Date: Mon, 29 Sep 1997 22:55:06 -0400   I think about the *nicest* mixture I ever encountered was on a 2m/14(?)rk. Reuter. The IIrk had been scaled and voiced in such a way that with one could do as E.M.S. suggested (match it with a flute and play a melody against the celestes); but yet with full organ, the mixture added just the right amount of *sparkle* to the instrument!  
(back) Subject: Re: Out of place From: Zinger <dandub@gte.net> Date: Mon, 29 Sep 1997 19:59:37   Yup....an end unit always helps....one less neighbor to worry about....ha!   On 29-Sep-97, Shirley wrote: >At 08:30 09/29/97, you wrote:   >>P.S. >>In fact several of the neighbors stop by and make requests, and to my >surprise the requests are NOT to stop playing....in fact one woman wants >>to know when I'm going to have the speakers installed in her >>house...... >> >>Dan   >I grew up in a twin house with a Hammond C2 with Leslie. The house was >built in the '40s at the latest, the '20s at the earliest. The organ >and speaker sat against the outside wall, not the party wall.   >I'll never forget the pounding on the party wall one time when I was >practicing particularly loudly, a theatre organ piece to be performed on >the Lansdowne Theatre's 3/8 Kimball. Thinking the neighbor was trying >to tell me something, I turned off the instrument immediately. It >wasn't till days later when she told me she was trying to tell me to >play louder, that she liked that particular piece!   >My husband lived in a rowhouse in Philadelphia, first with a >console-sized Gulbransen, and then with a Conn 651 and two pipe speaker >units. A rowhouse in this city is the equivalent to a townhouse. The >neighbors, while not always enjoying the music emanating from that house >(my husband, his brother, and his father all played), they rather >tolerated it. Then again, this was also back in the '60s when the >home-organ industry was booming.   >I think the message here is that, no matter what the "soundproofing" >conditions, no matter what, you need tolerant neighbors... and a corner >unit. :)   >--Shirley   -- Dan Wilkinson DanDub@GTE.net    
(back) Subject: Re: Bottle Dump Stop? From: Zinger <dandub@gte.net> Date: Mon, 29 Sep 1997 20:02:19   I have to admit that all the mixtures on my Allen work well together....some of them are in the MIDI sound module and there are several in the organ itself......they all blend quite well.....   On 29-Sep-97, Otto Pebworth wrote: >I think about the *nicest* mixture I ever encountered was on a >2m/14(?)rk. Reuter. The IIrk had been scaled and voiced in such a way >that with one could do as E.M.S. suggested (match it with a flute and play a >melody against the celestes); but yet with full organ, the mixture added >just the right amount of *sparkle* to the instrument!   >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org   -- Dan Wilkinson DanDub@GTE.net    
(back) Subject: Re: Out of place From: PAULMACVEY@delphi.com Date: Mon, 29 Sep 1997 23:14:49 -0400 (EDT)   In regard to Ron's question about the advisability of installing a pipe organ in a condominium, I wish I could put him into contact with a person here in Ames, Iowa, who did in fact install (still is enlarging) a grand pipe organ in the basement and main floor of his duplex-style condo. The contractor was aware of his intentions, indeed even constructed special chamber space for the installation. However, the common wall was double-studded offset framing, which was not sufficient to confine the sound created by a main floor installation, particularly the pedal division bass. To the best of my knowledge, this led to moving part of the installation to the basement, and building on a room on the outside wall of his unit to accomodate other ranks. His experience would be an interesting discussion topic, and I hope he responds to your inquiry. His solution to bringing the sound from the basement ranks to the living room upstairs involved creating a hard-surfaced "chute" from an existing exit window well which does an excellent job of bringing those sounds to the console area in the main floor living room.   Best of luck with your project - look for a masonry dividing wall with plenty of sound control!  
(back) Subject: Re: Concert Announcement From: MWORGLBAU@aol.com Date: Tue, 30 Sep 1997 00:15:04 -0400 (EDT)   Dear List Members,   I realize that this announcement may be posted way before the concert will be happening, but I'm leaving town in the next couple of days, will not have access to my computer while away, and will not be returning until the day of the concert.   Featured organist Christopher Toth will perform with the Westchester/Marina del Rey Symphony Concert on Saturday October 18,1997 at 8:00 P.M. Sacred Heart Chapel, Loyola-Marymount University, Los Angeles California. Adminision free.     Michael R. Williamson Williamson-Warne & Associates Hollywood Ca.    
(back) Subject: Re: Out of place From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Tue, 30 Sep 1997 01:04:59 -0400   >(Shirley) grew up in a house with a Hammond >C2 with Leslie.   Just for clarification, was Leslie with you or the Hammond????   Enjoy your turning, pulling, etc recital; when are you going to come out with an album??   Good to hear from ya. Hope all is swell.   Bruce Cornely, organist (OHS & AGO) University United Methodist Church and Student Center Wicks ('56) 3/16r Gainesville Florida Dean, Gainesville Chapter AGO  
(back) Subject: Re: Old Music Books From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Tue, 30 Sep 1997 01:26:34 -0400   The only mending I have done is to pages that have torn at the fold. I do this by cutting a piece of plain paper about 1" or 1-1/2" by 3 or 4", folding it lengthwise so that it will turn, sliding it through the binding to connect the two detached page parts, and then taping the new sheet to the old pages. This has worked very well in the Widor-Schweitzer Bach editions and old Karg-Elerg CP books. Good luck.   Bruce Cornely, organist (OHS & AGO) University United Methodist Church and Student Center Wicks ('56) 3/16r Gainesville Florida Dean, Gainesville Chapter AGO