PipeChat Digest #629 - Tuesday, December 15, 1998
 
Christmas Greetings 1998
  by "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net>
FW: Handyman Organ
  by "Brian Graham" <bgraham@geaf.com>
Re: FW: Handyman Organ
  by "bruce cornely" <cremona84000@webtv.net>
To Brian Graham
  by "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net>
TO BRIAN GRAHAM
  by "Bud" <budchris@earthlink.net>
To Brian Graham - P.S.
  by "Bud" <budchris@earthlink.net>
Re: TO BRIAN GRAHAM
  by <Afreed0904@aol.com>
Carols during Advent?
  by <basset3@warwick.net>
Re: TO BRIAN GRAHAM
  by "Kevin Cartwright" <kevin1@alaweb.com>
Re: Carols during Advent?
  by <Afreed0904@aol.com>
Re: Carols during Advent?
  by <DudelK@aol.com>
Re: Carols during Advent?
  by <Afreed0904@aol.com>
Re: Carols during Advent?
  by "bruce cornely" <cremona84000@webtv.net>
TO: Kevin Cartright
  by "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net>
Conventon Advertising
  by "Judy A. Ollikkala" <71431.2534@compuserve.com>
Carols during Advent?
  by "Judy A. Ollikkala" <71431.2534@compuserve.com>
Re: TO: Kevin Cartright
  by "Kevin Cartwright" <kevin1@alaweb.com>
Re: Carols during Advent?
  by "bruce cornely" <cremona84000@webtv.net>
WANTED: Diaphone Resonator
  by "Kevin Cartwright" <kevin1@alaweb.com>
MBSI
  by "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net>
Stupid Jokes
  by "Mark Hopper" <mahopper@bellsouth.net>
 


(back) Subject: Christmas Greetings 1998 From: "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net> Date: Mon, 14 Dec 1998 08:49:19 -0500   Here's to all the wonderfully nice new friends I have met here on PipeChat. It is so nice--people on common ground, sharing common thoughts, on common interests. May this season and the new year bring joy and happiness to all here on PipeChat. Yours', Rick Veague dutchorgan@svs.net    
(back) Subject: FW: Handyman Organ From: Brian Graham <bgraham@geaf.com> Date: Mon, 14 Dec 1998 09:51:21 -0600   >Preface: If you are a "Give me trackers or give >me death" person, the following will probably >offend you. I apologize in advance. > >I'm exploring options for a residence organ, and >I have a ton of questions. Any information that >you would be kind enough to offer would be >greatly appreciated. > >I'd love to have a nice 19th century tracker, and I >will explore this option, but I expect that it won't fit >my budget or my living room. > >I may try to piece something together, and even >if I find a whole organ that fits my needs it will >probably need work. My local Theatre Organ Society >is putting together an organ, and I thought that would >be a great way to gain experience, but most of the >crew is retired and they do the organ work during >regular business hours. Unfortunately, I also work >during regular business hours, 20 miles away. >Oh well. > >Since I am determined to have a pipe organ, even >if it's one long flute rank, I want to research the >option of putting something together myself. (say, >2M/P, 9 ranks or so max., w/ some unification), >and I'd appreciate any first hand knowledge on the >following topics and/or any information about books >on these subjects: > >1) When buying a used console, are there any >particularly good or bad types for this purpose? >(i.e., are there makers that are well known for >good or bad contacts, etc.) > >2) I've read brief comments about people >converting electro-pneumatic windchests to >direct electric. How easy is this to do? What are >the cons? (I presume the major pros are that you >don't have to learn how to work with leather, and >releathering will never be necessary) Is there >any published material showing how to do it? > >3) When buying ranks of pipes, is there any >published material that I can use as a guideline >for scales? (I know that a bigger scale in a flue >pipe is generally louder, but I don't know what >scale 8' principal (geigen principal, rohrflute, >dulciana, etc.) would be a good foundation for >a chamber organ in a 12'x24'x9' room, etc.) > >4) I'd need blower, reservoir, tremulant, >windchests, pipes, console and relay? Am I >forgetting anything? Is there any published >material on how a modern organ relay works? > >5) Is there any published material on the topic >of revoicing for this purpose? Should I steer >clear of dull-toned flues, or is there a practical >way to brighten them up? What types of pipes >are basically irredeemable? > >Thanks!!! > >  
(back) Subject: Re: FW: Handyman Organ From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Mon, 14 Dec 1998 12:42:25 -0500 (EST)     >Preface: If you are a "Give me trackers or give >me death" person, the following will probably > offend you. I apologize in advance. Wow! What a sneaky way to get me to read your post!! ;-)   >I'm exploring options for a residence organ, > and I have a ton of questions. Well, you've come to the right place. There are a good many on this list who have "been there / done that."   >2) I've read brief comments about people > converting electro-pneumatic windchests to > direct electric. Having never done this I can't comment on it; however, I have worked on both types. My preference (between the two) both tonally and mechanically is electropneumatic. I actually enjoy working with leather than with wires. I would suggest that you get some experience working on both before you decide which way to go on your own instrument. Maybe get a couple of old chests (off-set with a dozen notes or so) to work on just for experience. Very likely, if you releather the chest yourself and do a good job, it will not need releathering in your lifetime.   >Should I steer clear of dull-toned flues, or is > there a practical way to brighten them up? There is a lot that can be done with old pipes, but you'll need to check with the experienced. Theyr'e here, though!   If I were in you position, and looking for an EP chest, I'd go with old Skinner or Moller. The actions are quite simple (relatively) and very reliable.   But, of course, I'd rather work on a tracker (sorry , just had to say it!!!)   ........................bruce cornely........................ o o o o ______________ o o o o d o g s ______________ o o h o o a o o ______________ o o p s   ............. cremona84000@webtv.net ............     Heaven goes by favor. If it went by merit, you would stay out and your dog would go in. -- Mark Twain    
(back) Subject: To Brian Graham From: "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net> Date: Mon, 14 Dec 1998 12:49:24 -0500   Hi, Brian... The Organ Clearing House out east would be a good place to start looking. To my knowledge, trackers cannot be unified. Direct-electric machines are for the most part, very reliable, but are often shunned by died-in-the-wool organ people. Very often, The Diapason (magazine) has many organs for sale which would suit your needs. I have even seen cabinet organs there too, of 1 or 2m, and 3 to 4r of pipes that fit in a 10-foot ceiling height. There are at least two Wicks up for sale in it now. Many times blowers are included along with, of course, regulators and all the other necessities. If you go shopping, be sure to bring along a KNOWLEDGABLE pipe organ person. You don't want to get gypped. Rick Veague dutchorgan@svs.net    
(back) Subject: TO BRIAN GRAHAM From: Bud <budchris@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 14 Dec 1998 11:12:00 -0800   Another place to look is the New Theatre Organ Classifieds ... don't be put off by the "Theatre Organ" part ... they list everything under the sun. The address is:   http://theatreorgans.com/ads/wtsello.htm   Cheers,   Bud Clark St. Matthew's-in-the-Shopping-Center (but not for long ... the construction loan was approved!)    
(back) Subject: To Brian Graham - P.S. From: Bud <budchris@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 14 Dec 1998 11:19:22 -0800   Just for the record, it IS possible to do all sorts of wondrous strange things with tracker action. It isn't possible to make a single rank play at 16-8-5 1/3-4-3 1/5-2 2/3-2-1 3/5-1 1/3-1 like it is with an electric unit chest, but it IS possible to have a single rank available on more than one keyboard ...several builders make "either-or" setups where most of the organ is playable from either keyboard, with maybe a defining independent 8' Principal, mixture or reed on each keyboard in addition.   Duplexing, by the way, was known to Schnitger; and there were occasions where he used it. Present-day Fisk organs like the ones in Dallas make extensive use of it. I have to kind of chuckle at that ... we used to "roast" electro-pneumatic organs with that many pedal borrows (grin).   Cheers,   BUD    
(back) Subject: Re: TO BRIAN GRAHAM From: Afreed0904@aol.com Date: Mon, 14 Dec 1998 15:03:58 EST     In a message dated 12.14.98 2:12:22 PM, budchris@earthlink.net writes:   <<the construction loan was approved!>>   Mazel tov!   Alan  
(back) Subject: Carols during Advent? From: basset3@warwick.net Date: Mon, 14 Dec 1998 16:57:17 -0500   As a sub practicing for Advent I at a Lutheran church, I noticed 'Hark' and 'Joy' in the mix with 'Jordan's Banks' and 'Wake, Awake.' Hum-m-m. So I asked and the pastor's response was: I am not a 'liturgical antiquarian.' It's our culture. We no longer bring the tree in on Christmas eve, and out culture starts the celebration the day after Thanksgiving; so our church adapts as well. I checked with the Methodist pastor whom I saw at the grocery store--same thing. Carols start right after Thanksgiving. Has advent season observance disappeared, and I didn't know it? Robert Clooney (Milford, PA)  
(back) Subject: Re: TO BRIAN GRAHAM From: Kevin Cartwright <kevin1@alaweb.com> Date: Mon, 14 Dec 1998 16:56:36 -0600   Bud wrote: > > Another place to look is the New Theatre Organ Classifieds ... don't be > put off by the "Theatre Organ" part ... they list everything under the > sun. The address is:   Except player/reproducing pianos, and band organs and such... Looked, but with no success.   krc      
(back) Subject: Re: Carols during Advent? From: Afreed0904@aol.com Date: Mon, 14 Dec 1998 18:53:55 EST     In a message dated 12.14.98 4:57:14 PM, basset3@warwick.net writes:   <<"I am not a 'liturgical antiquarian.' It's our culture. We no longer bring the tree in on Christmas eve, and out culture starts the celebration the day after Thanksgiving; so our church adapts as well."   Has advent season observance disappeared, and I didn't know it?>>   Nice guy, Robert. Bring shame down on the Lutherans and the Methodists in one swell foop!   Which answer do you want?   1. Oh! You didn't notice? The church has quite totally accommodated itself to the culture now. The pastors are in many cases on their second or third marriage. We have Christmas in November and early December, and Epiphany has been dropped. Soon Lent will be in January and February and by A.D. 2020 (oops! 2020 C.E.) Easter will be the Mid-Winter Festival. We have Praze-Bands instead of organs and pianos and harps and stuff, and "Worship Leaders" instead of a pastor, deacon, choir, etc. You never rocked to "O Sacred Head"?--you ain't lived. Pastors wear jeans and cowboy boots. A major television preacher stops calling himself a "Christian" and regards Jesus as his "leader and guide." "Churches" are now "worship centers." "Hymns" don't even exist in many places. The narthex is now the "lobby." Inconvenient pregnancies are terminated even with funding from the denominational health- care plan. "Evangelism" is now "outreach." Quota systems determine who shall be delegates to a church convention. Sunday School and catechism instruction are pretty much "out of it"; the kids aren't "turned on" by it. Municipal and private choral societies present the music of the church much better than the church (in any form) can. People receive Holy Communion from a wicker biscuit basket and a bunch of little shot-glasses. What used to be "sin" is now "psychosocial maladjustment." I know, and know of, organists who have significantly higher musico-liturgical standards than their pastors.   Many of the above whines are not awfully significant, because they are purely terminological--but that's the style of the day. It depends on what your definition of "is" is.   2. None of the above is true. Well, some of it. Enough of it, in some places, to be rather disappointing. But actually, that movement, which has been under way for over a century (and actually as many as three--check out Thomas Jefferson), is now sinking. The Church, I believe, is rediscovering what it means to "be" the Church. Advent (to use your example) is coming back strongly--even in congregations that never knew there was one! People who historically have good reason to be surprised by it, because they have previously been socially marginalized, are finding themselves warmly and genuinely welcomed in congregations who discover that their precious homogeneity is not one of the identifying "marks of the church." Chalices are being re-introduced. A really heroic call to ethical commitment to social justice is being made, and heard, and acted on! Congregations are taking to the streets, preaching the Law and the Gospel, in word and deed. Somewhat against the flow!--but isn't that what we're called to be? A "peculiar people"?   I am so sure of that that I trust that (while I've made some more enemies with #1 above) some people on this list will pick up positive threads of #2 above and carry the ball far more eloquently than I can (okay, mixed metaphor). Which I'll certainly welcome.   Ducking,   Alan Freed, St. Luke's Church, Manhattan http://www.thelutheran.org/9709/page26.html                
(back) Subject: Re: Carols during Advent? From: DudelK@aol.com Date: Mon, 14 Dec 1998 18:50:49 EST   In a message dated 98-12-14 16:57:18 EST, you write:   << As a sub practicing for Advent I at a Lutheran church, I noticed 'Hark' and 'Joy' in the mix with 'Jordan's Banks' and 'Wake, Awake.' Hum-m-m. So I asked and the pastor's response was: I am not a 'liturgical antiquarian.' It's our culture. >>   A lot of people have simply sold out whatever great treasure they or their tradition once espoused.   On the other hand, even though "Joy to the World" is often associated with Christmas, there doesn't seem to be anything overtly Christmassy about it. Indeed, the words of the first verse, "Let earth receive her king. Let every heart prepare him room," seem to sound rather Adentish (Adventian?).   Comfort and joy to all!    
(back) Subject: Re: Carols during Advent? From: Afreed0904@aol.com Date: Mon, 14 Dec 1998 19:27:12 EST     In a message dated 12.14.98 7:17:49 PM, DudelK@aol.com writes:   <<even though "Joy to the World" is often associated with Christmas, there doesn't seem to be anything overtly Christmassy about it. Indeed, the words of the first verse, "Let earth receive her king. Let every heart prepare him room," seem to sound rather Adentish (Adventian?). >>   And in fact, in the [Lutheran] Service Book and Hymnal of 1958, that hymn was the final hymn in the Advent section of the hymnal--the bridge from Advent into Christmas.   Alan Freed  
(back) Subject: Re: Carols during Advent? From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Mon, 14 Dec 1998 21:03:17 -0500 (EST)     >And in fact, in the [Lutheran] Service Book and > Hymnal of 1958, that hymn was the final > hymn in the Advent section of the hymnal--the > bridge from Advent into Christmas. In the Episcopal Hymnal 1940, Joy to the World was not only in the General Hymns section, but it was set to the tune "Richmond".   ........................bruce cornely........................ o o o o ______________ o o o o d o g s ______________ o o h o o a o o ______________ o o p s   ............. cremona84000@webtv.net ............     Heaven goes by favor. If it went by merit, you would stay out and your dog would go in. -- Mark Twain    
(back) Subject: TO: Kevin Cartright From: "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net> Date: Mon, 14 Dec 1998 21:26:46 -0500   Ah, another mechanical music fan? If you are looking for band organs, nickelodions, and reproducing players, try the classifides in the MBSI (Musical Box Society International) magazine. There are LOTS of musical gems in there for sale--and wanted! Rick Veague    
(back) Subject: Conventon Advertising From: "Judy A. Ollikkala" <71431.2534@compuserve.com> Date: Mon, 14 Dec 1998 21:30:08 -0500   To PipeChat from the advertising manager for the 1999 Region I AGO Convention, Worcester MA Program Book Ad & Web info.   The 5% discount deadline for Advertising for the program book has been extended until 12/31/98. See http://bershad.com/ago/ad-rates.html PLEASE VISIT our updated website that shows our completed schedule and other information. http://bershad.com/ago   Submitted by Judy Ollikkala      
(back) Subject: Carols during Advent? From: "Judy A. Ollikkala" <71431.2534@compuserve.com> Date: Mon, 14 Dec 1998 21:30:14 -0500   Advent is very much in evidence in the churches where I have recently been organist, two Catholic and two Episcopal. I can't speak for Lutheran. Christmas music is not sung until Christmas Eve, period. The only visual concession is a "Giving Tree" set up in the sanctuary for gifts to needy children, or a "mitten and scarf" tree, etc. The creche is set up for Christmas Eve, or by the children on Christmas Eve. Also, in the Catholic church I am presently with, there is a Penitential Service next Wednesday with eight priests hearing confessions in the sanctuary. The choir and I are to sing and play hymns designed to cover the sound of the congregation as they make their confessions. This is something I am unfamiliar with.  
(back) Subject: Re: TO: Kevin Cartright From: Kevin Cartwright <kevin1@alaweb.com> Date: Mon, 14 Dec 1998 21:11:12 -0600   VEAGUE wrote: > > Ah, another mechanical music fan? If you are looking for band organs, > nickelodions, and reproducing players, try the classifides in the MBSI > (Musical Box Society International) magazine. There are LOTS of musical gems > in there for sale--and wanted! Rick Veague   Why not send us all the address??   Thanks!   KRC      
(back) Subject: Re: Carols during Advent? From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Mon, 14 Dec 1998 22:23:22 -0500 (EST)     >... in the Catholic church I am presently with, > there is a Penitential Service next Wednesday > with eight priests hearing confessions in the > sanctuary. The choir and I are to sing and > play hymns designed to cover the sound of > the congregation as they make their > confessions. This is something I am > unfamiliar with. We did ours last week. I played for an hour and a half. Unfortunately, some of the penitents didn't get the message it was advent and were having Mardi Gras over in the NE corner. Our theme was "throwing away stones" to symbolize the judgment of casting stones and the symbolic casting away of sin. After each penitent made their confession they tossed their stone (picked up at the door at entry) into a terra cotta urn. It was dramatic. We do this twice each year -- Advent and Lent.   ........................bruce cornely........................ o o o o ______________ o o o o d o g s ______________ o o h o o a o o ______________ o o p s   ............. cremona84000@webtv.net ............     Heaven goes by favor. If it went by merit, you would stay out and your dog would go in. -- Mark Twain    
(back) Subject: WANTED: Diaphone Resonator From: Kevin Cartwright <kevin1@alaweb.com> Date: Mon, 14 Dec 1998 21:26:17 -0600   Hi again...   Does anyone have a 16' (not exactly, anywhere between C and E or F would be fine) Diaphone RESONATOR that could cut into a few pieces and mail to me?? I'd also take any large metal or wood reed resonator other than Diaphone...but Diaphones are the best bass reeds, in my opinion, if you are looking for a rich, "full" sound. I'll be traveling to Arizona this weekend, so if anyone wants to donate one, I'll be covering a large portion of the U.S., and might just be able to handle shipping myself. I have NO MONEY to pay for this, all I want is an old junk resonator (any large reed resonator would probably do anyhow). If anyone wants the extra space, CONTACT ME, I'd love to talk!   Why?? I'm sick and tired of the "emptyness" of our concert Tubas. I have a "nasty little idea" with a Tuba mouthpiece, a little adjustment, and a 16' reed resonator. (BBb Tuba: "low C"= 8' by the way, maximum resonation at "low" (= 16') BBb. From there, it gets "nasty" or "blatty," and above it becomes mellow, as one would expect.) If this all fails, you can rest in comfort knowing the resonator would probably become a wall hanging to add interest to the organ room. So, it will "live on" for a while what ever way you go...   Let me know.   Kevin Cartwright (Greenville, Alabama) kevin1@alaweb.com        
(back) Subject: MBSI From: "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net> Date: Mon, 14 Dec 1998 23:23:23 -0500   okee-dokee... The postal address is MBSI Box 297 Marietta,OH 45750 E-mail address is musicbox@collector.org   Rick Veague    
(back) Subject: Stupid Jokes From: "Mark Hopper" <mahopper@bellsouth.net> Date: Mon, 14 Dec 1998 22:24:00 -0600   Q: How many organists does it take to change a light bulb? A: It depends--does the light bulb have pistons?   Q: Christopher Hogwood, Daniel Barenboim, and Neville Mariner are all on the same plane when it ditches in the middle of the Atlantic Ocean. Who is likely to be saved? A: Mozart   Q: How many organists does it take to tile a kitchen? A: One, but you have to slice him VERY thin.   Q: How can you tell that there's a singer at your front door? A: They never know when to come in.   Q: What's the difference between a soprano and the P.L.O.? A: You can negotiate with the P.L.O.   Q: What does New Age Music sound like when played backwards? A: New Age Music.   Merry Christmas!   Mark Hopper