PipeChat Digest #228 - Sunday, February 1, 1998
 
Re: Upsetting the congregation
  by <PHarri5833@aol.com>
Last Verse Harmonisations
  by Mark Quarmby <markq@mail.flex.com.au>
Re: Test
  by <HDKarras@aol.com>
Re: Test
  by o\r fiol <fiol@bway.net>
Re: Thoughts on Volume
  by <CDKrug@aol.com>
Re: St. Thomas, NYC
  by <SCoonrod@aol.com>
Re: My funny story
  by Kevin Cartwright <kevin1@alaweb.com>
Re: Wedding Fees  (was: From Today's Sydney Morning Herald)
  by <CDKrug@aol.com>
Re: Helping Congregations to Sing
  by Kevin Cartwright <kevin1@alaweb.com>
Re: Helping Congregations to Sing (Was Re: Upsetting the   congregation)
  by John L. Speller <jlspeller@stlnet.com>
Minniapolis Kimball
  by Richard Wolf <floww@webtv.net>
Re: Minniapolis Kimball
  by Richard Wolf <floww@webtv.net>
Re: St. Thomas, NYC
  by John L. Speller <jlspeller@stlnet.com>
George Bozeman
  by <ComposerTX@aol.com>
Percy Fletcher
  by <Giwro@aol.com>
Re: George Bozeman
  by <Giwro@aol.com>
Re: Another Moeller Question
  by <RMaryman@aol.com>
Re: Another Moeller Question
  by <RMaryman@aol.com>
Re: Another Moeller Question
  by Shirley <pnst@itw.com>
Tom Hazelton On NPR Tonight
  by John Balboni <JohnB@GCQ.net>
Re: Tom Hazelton On NPR Tonight
  by Ron Yost <musik@tcsn.net>
Re: Tom Hazelton On NPR Tonight
  by Stanley Lowkis <nstarfil@mediaone.net>
Re: Which is it?  Moller, Moeller or Mo"ller?
  by Jim Saenger <chamade@Early.COM>
Re: St. Thomas, NYC
  by Jim Saenger <chamade@Early.COM>
Re: Percy Fletcher
  by Karl E. Moyer <kmoyer@marauder.millersv.edu>
Re: Tom Hazelton On NPR Tonight
  by Kevin Cartwright <kevin1@alaweb.com>
Re: George Bozeman
  by bruce cornely <cremona84000@webtv.net>
Re: Tom Hazelton On NPR Tonight
  by o\r fiol <fiol@bway.net>
 


(back) Subject: Re: Upsetting the congregation From: PHarri5833@aol.com Date: Sat, 31 Jan 1998 05:37:52 EST   Any verse is available for "treatment" such as by having the choir sing unison verses, harmony, men only, upper voices etc. but the main issue is to remember that both the organ and choir are there to assist the congregation to worship.   My congregation seem to find some embellishments can help this process and several have explicitly said so. I suspect there have also been times, hopefully not too frequent, when my enthusiasm has got the better of my discretion and the accompaniment has become a distraction.   Therefore apply all of your musical skills to help the worship - a subtle but spine tingling chord change can give a wonderful lift if it is correctly chosen but it can also curdle the marrow in the wrong place! Only the use of good taste will keep you right and as this is set in marmelade rather than stone, it can be impossible to satisfy everyone.   Peter Harrison Emmanuel Church, Holcombe, Ramsbottom, Lancs, GB  
(back) Subject: Last Verse Harmonisations From: markq@mail.flex.com.au (Mark Quarmby) Date: Sat, 31 Jan 1998 21:50:02 +1000   I tend to use Noel Rawsthorne's last verse arrangments the most (both books) and also June Nixon's new book of 200 (Pub. Kevin Mayhew) but my favourites are by Andrew Fletcher and published by Oecumuse - "Organ Uplift" and "More Organ Uplift". A word of warning: these arrangements can only be successfully used if you know that the congregation knows the tune extremely well and you have a good choir leading as the organ part in these arrangements is "way over the top" but does wonders for giving you shivers up the spine! Blaenwern, Cwm Rhonnda, Helmsley and Hyfydol are some of my favourites. You really need a large instrument to bring them off (32' reed etc for the last line!). Also they will soon lose their effect if you use them too often. I save them for those occasions like Synod, when the cathedral is packed with clergy and regular church goers and I want to add that something special to the hymns: I then reach for Andrew Fletcher's books. I wish he would write some more!         Mark      
(back) Subject: Re: Test From: HDKarras@aol.com Date: Sat, 31 Jan 1998 06:51:20 EST   Hi, sorry, sorry for the mistake with my mail to Philippe. The mail was intended only privat and i make the mistake to send it to pipechat and not to the right privat e-mail adress. Please be patient with me. Thanks, Hans  
(back) Subject: Re: Test From: "o\r fiol" <fiol@bway.net> Date: Sat, 31 Jan 1998 07:53:26 -0600   Dear Hans,   Es macht nichts.   Love, Orlando    
(back) Subject: Re: Thoughts on Volume From: CDKrug@aol.com Date: Sat, 31 Jan 1998 08:48:20 EST   In a message dated 98-01-29 07:46:18 EST, you write:   << There are many purely acoustic sounds that indeed touch other parties of the human being than the ears >>   Indeed, in the music of every culture on Earth are drums, flutes, singing and dance. Music has always been a full-body experience.  
(back) Subject: Re: St. Thomas, NYC From: SCoonrod@aol.com Date: Sat, 31 Jan 1998 08:53:42 EST   In a message dated 98-01-30 23:19:24 EST, syoder+@andrew.cmu.edu writes:   << I see no such 'chorus' of quintadenas (which stop, BTW, was a Hope-Jones invention, yes?) >>   If memory serves me correctly, Quintadeens, Quintadena, Quintades, Pommers, and the like have been around for centuries before Hope-Jones arrival on the organ scene!! Particularly in early baroque German instruments. :-)   RandyT  
(back) Subject: Re: My funny story From: Kevin Cartwright <kevin1@alaweb.com> Date: Sat, 31 Jan 1998 07:52:02 -0600   > But one lady, overcome with emotion, approached the organ builder after mass, > and exuded, "Oh, Mr. Frels, the organ sounded just GLORIOUS this morning!"     I have an aunt that has a nice lack of common sense. One time she even claimed she had a two-cylinder car. But, we performed the miracle of getting my mother's side of the family to come to our church for Christmas. One uncle, aunt, and cousin were Southern Baptist, then there were two uncles, two aunts, and one cousin, AND my grandmother who attended the Church of Christ. But, we talked my grandmother into coming, and that "made it o.k." for eeveryone else. I don't know why, I see nothing wrong with the Methodist Church. Well anyway, the aunt that lacked common sense, and another aunt commented on how big the pipe organ was, right when they first saw it. Later on, my aunt found out I played it, and then made a bigger fool of herself, and warned me not to 'break' it because it looked so "pretty." Well, what they were commenting on was the exposed great organ that uses about 9 ranks. That ends this part of the story.   Months later, my grandmother was visiting one Saturday, and found out I was going to church to practice. She had to go with me; she wanted to hear me play a little bit. I started playing Tocatta and Fugue (in D Minor...by Bach) and when I jumped to the swell, the organ had that "phantom fit" that I was talking about a long time ago. Every pipe in the great AND swell played, hurting our ears and winding the organ. (I had a nice little ring in my ears after that.) I told the main organist that she might want to play it a little and determine if she wanted to risk that happening again during the service the next day.   Sunday morning came, and it did it again. My grandmother, thinking I'd "broken" the organ, was glad to find out that it was not me, a lightning bolt had taken out a ground cable, and the effects were an insane swell. That was also the reason for the trompetts turning on and off by themselves (during the pieces that did not use them; if the stop was on, they didn't mess up, but when it was off, they wanted to be on).   Just another boring story. (I'm implying MY stories are boring, not yours; that is, unless you WANT your stories to be called boring.)   Kevin C. kevin1@alaweb.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Wedding Fees (was: From Today's Sydney Morning Herald) From: CDKrug@aol.com Date: Sat, 31 Jan 1998 08:57:52 EST   In a message dated 98-01-29 16:09:46 EST, you write:   << A pipe organ as one adds more stops, need not necessarily get 'much' louder (especially if all the stops are say at 8 & 4), but the sound as one adds more stops, gets a lot richer and fuller. With the 'average' electronic/digital organ on the other hand, there is not a marked difference to the depth of tone as one adds more unison stops, on the other hand, the 'sound' can often get 'thinner'. >>   Hmmmm. I find that true of sine wave instruments (Hammonds & others w/ drawbars), and first generation digitals, but not of multi-oscellator analogs nor of more recent digitals.   An analog signal works pretty much like an accoustic one, so this is not surprising--resonance is resonance. Whether we like a particular type of resonance is a matter of opionion and lengthy debate. ;-)   Nothing in a digital can resonate until the signal becomes analog. I suspect that's the difference, from an electronic standpoint.  
(back) Subject: Re: Helping Congregations to Sing From: Kevin Cartwright <kevin1@alaweb.com> Date: Sat, 31 Jan 1998 08:02:12 -0600   Paul F. Stapel wrote: > > At 06:51 PM 1/30/98, Shirley wrote: > >.. > > > >Are there other theories out there what could help a non-singing > >congregation to open their mouths and make a joyful noise? > > Besides not having a good singing/music program in the church or schools > (which is the first killer to good hymn singing), the acoustics of the > church tell a lot to a congregation's ears -- if they can hear themselves > too well and the accompaniment is 'too far away' they tend not to want to > sing too obviously -- can't embarass themselves in front of the people > around them!! Very live acoustics needs more 'breaks' in the organ line to > keep notes from running into each other...dead acoustics needs lots of > connection to keep the flow going.. > > Paul S   I have a connection for you. I don't like to boast, BUT, I have this little gift of being able to move my hands and fingers from one place to the next, without it breaking. The main organist said she couldn't do it, and I had a real talent there. Now, in my opionion, the church has the best acoustics in the area, so there is not much room for a break between notes in a song, and if you have to change hand position, there is usually a break in them. Say I would use fingers 2 and 4 for a C natural and E natural. When I jump them (2 & 4) to the D natural and F natural, it sounds the same as using fingers 3 and 5 directly from 2 and 4 without moving the hand. Make sense? Also, the Flor Peeters (sp?) "Little Organ Book" teaches you how to change fingers during the note so you can travel easier. It also does this with toe-and-heel and left-and-right for pedals. I think it is the easiest technique I have tried.   Just a thought,   Kevin Cartwright Greenville, Alabama kevin1@alaweb.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Helping Congregations to Sing (Was Re: Upsetting the congregation) From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com> Date: Sat, 31 Jan 1998 09:44:49 -0600 (CST)   At 06:51 PM 1/30/98, Shirley wrote: Too slow, and your congregation has to take too many >breaths, they lose interest. Too fast, and they will stop singing >altogether because they can't spit the words out as fast as you're playing >the hymn.   >Are there other theories out there what could help a non-singing >congregation to open their mouths and make a joyful noise?   Though tempo is important, in my opinion phrasing is much more important. The organ should "sing" the words along with the congregation. Our organist is very good at doing this, and the congregation raises the roof. She even manages to get them to sing the psalm to Anglican chant when the choir is on holiday in the summer. The more the organist can concentrate on the meaning of the words of the particular stanza he or she is playing, paying attention to punctuation, mood, etc., the more he or she is going to be able to carry the congregation along and get them to sing. It helps to do this if the organist can sing along too.   John, in a sunny 65 degree St. Louis, Missouri.    
(back) Subject: Minniapolis Kimball From: floww@webtv.net (Richard Wolf) Date: Sat, 31 Jan 1998 11:53:17 -0600   Does anyone know the status of this Civic Center Project?  
(back) Subject: Re: Minniapolis Kimball From: floww@webtv.net (Richard Wolf) Date: Sat, 31 Jan 1998 12:14:18 -0600   Excuse my spelling of Minneapolis. I washed my hands and can't do a thing with them.  
(back) Subject: Re: St. Thomas, NYC From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com> Date: Sat, 31 Jan 1998 12:26:10 -0600 (CST)   At 09:34 PM 1/30/98 -0500, Ken Sybesma wrote:   >> DM726@delphi.com wrote: >> >> > Also, does the church have a web site? >> >> Not that I've been able to find with metacrawler, and consulting the >> Diocese of New York web page. Anyone know?   As far as I know the only Episcopal churches in NYC with webpages are Christ Church, the Church of the Transfiguration, St. Mary the Virgin, and Trinity Wall Street. The easiest way to find the website of any Anglican church in the world, including Episcopal Churches in the U.S.A., is to go to the "Anglicans Online" webpage, which you can either do by going to <www.anglican.org> and following the link to Anglicans Online or more directly by going to <www.anglican.org/online> The Anglicans Online website has links to everything imaginable including the latest news, help for inquirers, links to official Episcopal organizations, musical links (including -- Ugh! -- digital hymnals), links to individual clergy and dioceses and parishes, and even to other non-Episcopal Anglican churches in North America such as the Anglican Church of North America and the Reformed Episcopal Church. This is not the official website of the Episcopal Church -- or the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society to give it its official incorporated name -- which is <www.dfms.org> but it is an extremely useful resource.   John.    
(back) Subject: George Bozeman From: ComposerTX@aol.com Date: Sat, 31 Jan 1998 13:38:18 EST   anyone have an e-mail address for George Bozeman? thanks Danny Ray  
(back) Subject: Percy Fletcher From: Giwro@aol.com Date: Sat, 31 Jan 1998 13:42:55 EST   My organist is plaing a piece by Percy Fletcher this Sunday - anyone out there have information about this composer?   Jonathan Orwig Minister of Music Bethany Church  
(back) Subject: Re: George Bozeman From: Giwro@aol.com Date: Sat, 31 Jan 1998 13:46:49 EST   In a message dated 98-01-31 13:41:57 EST, you write:   << anyone have an e-mail address for George Bozeman? thanks Danny Ray >> website: http://www.tneorg.com/bozeman/navframe.html email: 71562.1554@compuserve.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Another Moeller Question From: RMaryman@aol.com Date: Sat, 31 Jan 1998 15:17:53 EST   Kevin -   Here are some answers to your mulit-part question regarding Mollers:   It was not typical for any builder to enclose the Great (including Moller) but the client sometimes asked for them (Moller) to enclose the great, which as younoted does give the organ more flexibility (and expressiveness, if you are into a more orchestral approach to playing). All you need to do to simulate a typical unenclosed great is to park the shutters OPEN ;-).   Regarding the pistons - they are probably the typical Moller hold-and-set type. the way you set them is to depresss the piston (button) you wish to change, and while you hold the piston (in) select the stops to their on / off positions as you wish them to be. you will feel a bit of resistance, then they will 'give' into position if you are changeing them from "on" to '"Off" or vice versa.   As for the gedeckt pipe that is off sppech, it could also be a mal-functioning valve under the pipe, or even a chunk of dirt in the flue-way. At any rate, speech problems are best left to the pros to fix.   Cheers   Rick Maryman Staunton, VA  
(back) Subject: Re: Another Moeller Question From: RMaryman@aol.com Date: Sat, 31 Jan 1998 15:17:51 EST   In a message dated 98-01-28 13:19:35 EST, you write:   << did the Artistes sell well enough that Moller could make them in batches ['mass-produced', relatively speaking] against future orders, or were they stock design(s) built only individually-to-order (with possibly some stops made ahead in batches)? Just curious, Stan Yoder Moller Artiste organs were built individually, as ordered, when ordered and were assigned regular Opus Numbers. BTW, If you are looking for a nice 2M and Ped practice organ, these Artiste unit organs make a nice one. The main case is usually 4' by 8' or less and many fit under an 8' ceiling. they usually had nice cases and some even have the blower unit inside for a completely self- contained organ. the console is a standard AGO console. Alll the unification uses key contacts, so there is no bulky relay to deal with. AND most of the time the voicing is tame enough that you will not get innned-to-the-wall loudness evenwith full organ.   Rick Maryman Staunton VA  
(back) Subject: Re: Another Moeller Question From: Shirley <pnst@itw.com> Date: Sat, 31 Jan 1998 15:45:04   At 15:17 01/31/98 EST, you wrote:   >Regarding the pistons - they are probably the typical Moller hold-and-set >type. >the way you set them is to depresss the piston (button) you wish to change, >and while you hold the piston (in) select the stops to their on / off >positions as you wish them to be. you will feel a bit of resistance, then they >will 'give' into position if you are changeing them from "on" to '"Off" or >vice versa.     Hmm... Abington's Moller (1969) has a separate button. As I recall, it's labelled "Set". What one does is to set up the combination one wants, and press the piston while holding in the set button, and voila.  
(back) Subject: Tom Hazelton On NPR Tonight From: JohnB@GCQ.net (John Balboni) Date: Sat, 31 Jan 1998 16:11:54 -0500   I hope this isn't too late for list members to tune-in. I heard earlier this afternoon that Tom Hazelton is to be featured playing a Wurlitzer T.O. on tonight's "A Praire Home Companion" show on National Public Radio, starting at 6:00 PM, EST. According to their web site (http://phc.mpr.org/) , tonight's show is to be live from the Fitzgerald Theater in St. Paul. No mention there of Hazelton, but it was on the radio promo.   John Balboni    
(back) Subject: Re: Tom Hazelton On NPR Tonight From: Ron Yost <musik@tcsn.net> Date: Sat, 31 Jan 1998 14:10:16 -0800   At 04:11 7:24 PM 1/31/98 -0500, you wrote: >I hope this isn't too late for list members to tune-in. I heard earlier >this afternoon that Tom Hazelton is to be featured playing a Wurlitzer T.O. >on tonight's "A Praire Home Companion" show on National Public Radio, >starting at 6:00 PM, EST. According to their web site (http://phc.mpr.org/) >, tonight's show is to be live from the Fitzgerald Theater in St. Paul. No >mention there of Hazelton, but it was on the radio promo. > I just hear the promo on our local station .. KCBX, San Luis Obispo, Ca. The show starts here at 3:00 p.m.   It said Tom Hazelton will be playing Gershwin.   Ron  
(back) Subject: Re: Tom Hazelton On NPR Tonight From: Stanley Lowkis <nstarfil@mediaone.net> Date: Sat, 31 Jan 1998 20:11:23 -0500   Ron Yost wrote: > > At 04:11 7:24 PM 1/31/98 -0500, you wrote: > >I hope this isn't too late for list members to tune-in. I heard earlier > >this afternoon that Tom Hazelton is to be featured playing a Wurlitzer T.O. > >on tonight's "A Praire Home Companion" show on National Public Radio, > >starting at 6:00 PM, EST. According to their web site (http://phc.mpr.org/) > >, tonight's show is to be live from the Fitzgerald Theater in St. Paul. No > >mention there of Hazelton, but it was on the radio promo. > > > I just hear the promo on our local station .. KCBX, San Luis Obispo, Ca. > The show starts here at 3:00 p.m. > > It said Tom Hazelton will be playing Gershwin. > > Ron   I listened to the program which is repeated on many stations. Tom Hazleton performed three pieces and had a short interview.   It was good to hear the WurliTzer on the radio.   Stan  
(back) Subject: Re: Which is it? Moller, Moeller or Mo"ller? From: "Jim Saenger" <chamade@Early.COM> Date: Sat, 31 Jan 98 19:56:36 PST   Mr. Moeller was Danish and did his apprenticship with Marcussen. Never in Holland, etc.     ---------- > As I recall the Mo(e)ller family came to America from Holland. In the old > Dutch spelling, the > umlaut over the "o" indicates that it should be a long vowel. Modern spelling > would probably > be "Mooller." > > -- > Robert Ehrhardt <ehr@softdisk.com> > Noel Memorial UMC,Shreveport, LA > Team Amiga > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >      
(back) Subject: Re: St. Thomas, NYC From: "Jim Saenger" <chamade@Early.COM> Date: Sat, 31 Jan 98 20:01:41 PST   bad taste then, bad taste now. Affectation sells to those who will buy And always has   ---------- > In a message dated 98-01-30 23:19:24 EST, you write: > > << There is a 32' Quintaton in the Grand Choeur, also available on the > Pedal, >> > > There is currently (and for the past many years) a 32' Montre on the Grand > Choeur, which is also available in the Pedal as well. And what a beauty it > is! > > Scott Foppiano > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >      
(back) Subject: Re: Percy Fletcher From: "Karl E. Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersv.edu> Date: Sat, 31 Jan 1998 21:39:30 -0500 (EST)     12 Dec 1879, Derby - 10 Sept 1932, London.   A British organist, conductor, composer. Went to London to conduct in theatres, 1899. Wrote in light style with pleasant melodies.   He wrote a passion setting; anyoen know it? Available in print?   I suppose his two best-known organ pieces:   Fountain Reverie Festival Toccata--which you hear every so often.   I think I'll get out the toccata and play it one of these times again. In fact, one could make up brass parts to this piece ala the brass parts added to the toccata from Symph 5 of Widor!! (Hey!! There's my Transfiguration Sunday prelude!!!) Cordially, Karl E. Moyer Lancaster PA On Sat, 31 Jan 1998 Giwro@aol.com wrote:   > My organist is plaing a piece by Percy Fletcher this Sunday - anyone out there > have information about this composer? > > Jonathan Orwig > Minister of Music > Bethany Church > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >    
(back) Subject: Re: Tom Hazelton On NPR Tonight From: Kevin Cartwright <kevin1@alaweb.com> Date: Sat, 31 Jan 1998 21:33:36 -0600   > I listened to the program which is repeated on many stations. > Tom Hazleton performed three pieces and had a short interview. > > It was good to hear the WurliTzer on the radio. > > Stan   Ditto. I was glad to hear a theatre organ on the air, and since the show was live, it was at 5:00 EST here, so I got the mail about 12 minutes before it aired. However, listening for two hours, and only hearing about 5 minutes worth of theatre organ (especially since it was RIGHT THERE IN THE THEATRE the whole time), upset me a little bit. I have a "so-so" LP of somebody playing "Oldies on the Mighty Wurlitzer," so I still need my 'fix.' Maybe I can get that fix tomorrow (Sunday 1st) on Pipe Dreams. I have to get up at 6:30 a.m. EST, but ITS WORTH IT, unlike listening to all that other stuff waiting for another organ piece on the show (and then there was only one more to come). Did anyone notice the organ playing for one of those fake adds? Nothing special, but I guess it's worth something.   Doped up on cold medicine,   Kevin C. kevin1@alaweb.com  
(back) Subject: Re: George Bozeman From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Sat, 31 Jan 1998 23:34:37 -0500   George Bozeman is at: <gbozeman@compuserve.com>   bruce cornely o o o __________ o o o ago (dean) ohs o o __________ o o  
(back) Subject: Re: Tom Hazelton On NPR Tonight From: "o\r fiol" <fiol@bway.net> Date: Sun, 01 Feb 1998 02:25:19 -0600   A Prairee Home Companion is usually repeated on Sunday afternoons or evenings. In New York, it runs on WNYC A.M. 820 at 11 a.m. It's A.m. and mono, but when you've missed it, it does just fine.