PipeChat Digest #231 - Tuesday, February 3, 1998
 
Explanation, Postlude Show Off
  by Jim H <BALD1@prodigy.net>
Re: PipeChat Digest #230 - 02/02/98
  by gregory@mke.earthreach.com <gregory@mke.earthreach.com>
Re: showing off  (a bit long)
  by <SCoonrod@aol.com>
Re: PipeChat Digest #230 - 02/02/98
  by Bob Loesch <rrloesch@jps.net>
Re: Postlude showing off and organ builders
  by <ScottFop@aol.com>
Re: Postlude showing off
  by bruce cornely <cremona84000@webtv.net>
Re: Postlude showing off
  by bruce cornely <cremona84000@webtv.net>
Re: Helping Congregations to Sing (Was Re: Upsetting the  	 congregation)
  by Jim H <BALD1@prodigy.net>
Re: Correction
  by Jim H <BALD1@prodigy.net>
Re: Helping Congregations to Sing (Was Re: Upsetting the 	 congregation)
  by Jim H <BALD1@prodigy.net>
Cadet Chapel, WP: 8 Feb - Band & Organ Concert  (Cross-posted)
  by Patricia R. Maimone <patmai@juno.com>
 


(back) Subject: Explanation, Postlude Show Off From: Jim H <BALD1@prodigy.net> Date: Mon, 25 Aug 1997 18:15:08 -0500   My comment about me showing off during the Postlude was made due to the several posts concerning the volume of the organ, stop settings and other how to get a congregation to sing.   I think that we have all fell into the trap at one time or another, where we get so wrapped up in our organ playing that we forget why we are there. We must satisfy others as well as ourselves.   I have been playing for my congregation for 34 years. (Whooh, it don't seem possible.) It probably took me 20 of those to tone it down so that one could actually distinguish the different tones the organ was producing. Do I still like it loud? You betcha. But, only when appropriate. I also like it when you have to strain to hear it. The salizionals are extremely beautiful when played very softly. I find that I can contrast more within a piece and get favorable comments from the congregation. I look for comments which the parishioners state that they felt like they were "in church", and similar statements. When I hear those, then I have enhanced the service, rathen than detracting from it or being a focal point.   Unfortunately, pleasing a congregation and getting them to respond takes conditioning, both from the organist and the congregation. Yet, there are several hundred members of the congregation which must condition while there is usually only one organist. That pretty much places the burden on the organist.   My advice, learn your congregation, experiment with settings and volume and seek input from the congregation. If I am going to try something new, I often ask members who will give me an honest answer, to listen and critique what they hear. I also listen to the congregational singing to determine if they respond in a positive manner.   One last paragraph, and I will stop. Right before Christmas, I was playing our Saturday night service. Due to the weather, there were not many people in attendance. I decided to play the third verse with the chimes and full great playing the melody. I played the melody, alto and tenor on the swell with my left hand. Bass on the pedals. Due to the lack of people, this was plenty of organ, and I thought the chimes could be heard. I do this often in practice and it sounds pretty good.   The congregation stopped singing by the time I had played the first phrase. They loved it. But, they loved it so well, they quit singing and listened. Will I do that again? No. This is an example of something positive going negative. Yeah, they like it. But, the purpose of the hymn was to praise God, not listen to the organ. I flunked that test.   So my whole point goes back to praise God. Use your talents wisely and in a manner which entices the congregation to praise Him as well.   Jim H.  
(back) Subject: Re: PipeChat Digest #230 - 02/02/98 From: "gregory@mke.earthreach.com" <gregory@mke.earthreach.com> Date: Mon, 2 Feb 98 20:44:03 -0600   Good Evening:   This weekend I was offered a single manual French Mustel (sp) Paris Harmonium. This instrument has more than 15 sets of reeds and also contains a player mechanism and special rolls arranged for the organ specs.   Although I have restored several reed organs, player pianos & reproducing pianos, I have yet to tackle an instrument such as this.   Has anyone on this list had any restoration experiences on such an instrument.   Thanks for any information.   Tom Gregory Waukesha WI   p.s. I wonder if the owners of this list may wish to put a reasonable limit on the number of responses by individuals.  
(back) Subject: Re: showing off (a bit long) From: SCoonrod@aol.com Date: Mon, 2 Feb 1998 21:42:10 EST   Hello all:   Generally speaking, one should be very careful about her/his use of the organ in service playing. We have been discussing free accompaniments, hymns, and the role of music in divine service.   I tend to get creative with the introductions for the opening and closing hymns, leaving the hymn itself fairly straight so as to encourage singing. As a musician I have found myself stopping to listen to what the organist is doing on numerous occasions, and I have often wondered if I unintentionally ever caused the congregation to look up from the text to listen to the organ as it drew too much attention to itself. In my opinion, creative registration, more than varried harmony can really enliven hymn singing. I also use pedal points, simple descants on the organ such as putting alto or tenor notes in the soprano. Or, if you have a strong reed-- the tenor line played where it is written on a solo keyboard (usually with a few passing tones to relieve a sometimes 'stagnant' tenor line) is an easy way to 'spice up' a hymn without resorting to an out-and-out free accompaniment. Of course, varying the harmony when used in reserve is excellent, too.   If you are into improvisation (which I am) then a great way to enliven that aspect of one's playing is to go out and get "Dorothy Over The Rainbow" ASAP!! I got this a week ago, and it is amazing how it energized me for this past Sunday, and, although I usually shy away from "showing off" I let myself go last week, and got many positive comments + I felt like I had played my best, and that is a good feeling. In other words, your brain gains insight (in my case it definitely would not have had it!) it might not have had otherwise.   God is glorified in many ways; always use good judgement as to when the time is right, and happy playing :-)   Randy T    
(back) Subject: Re: PipeChat Digest #230 - 02/02/98 From: Bob Loesch <rrloesch@jps.net> Date: Mon, 02 Feb 1998 18:53:32 -0800   At 20:44 2/2/98 -0600, you wrote: >Good Evening: > >This weekend I was offered a single manual French Mustel (sp) Paris >Harmonium. This instrument has more than 15 sets of reeds and also >contains a player mechanism and special rolls arranged for the organ >specs. > >Although I have restored several reed organs, player pianos & reproducing >pianos, I have yet to tackle an instrument such as this. > >Has anyone on this list had any restoration experiences on such an >instrument.   Never restored a Mustell(?), but have restored an Aeolian Orchestrelle, also a player reed organ, but with only 8 sets of reeds. 15 sets must give quite an impressive sound! Does it work on pressure or vacuum, and what is the tracker scale? Also, what is the connection between the tracker bar and valve mechanism? The Aeolian is a pressure instrument, so the valve action is identical in operation to a tubular pneumatic inflate system, and is restored much the same way. Because it is a pressure system, the spoolbox in enclosed in an airtight box with a sliding glass door to allow pressurization of the tracker bar. Stop action is mechanical ventil. Hope this little bit of info helps. I find reed organs fascinating and have never seen a Mustel. Must be quite an instrument.   Good Luck!         Regards,   Bob        
(back) Subject: Re: Postlude showing off and organ builders From: ScottFop@aol.com Date: Mon, 2 Feb 1998 21:29:43 EST   In a message dated 98-02-02 18:12:48 EST, you write:   << Does the organist not demonstrate the talent bestowed by 'God' upon the organbuilder when s/he plays a difficult piece of music written by an equally blessed composer???? >>   Yes- when the organ builder has installed within the churh an instrument fit for worship, praise and good repertoire- unlike the useless huge pile of JUNK that currently resides in my current church position. >=o(   Scott Foppiano  
(back) Subject: Re: Postlude showing off From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Mon, 2 Feb 1998 23:10:06 -0500   Jill, Sometimes "slapping on full organ" is the result of being so caught up in the hymn, singing and worship, that it just seems like giving the most glorious sound we have to God. I'm not saying that as an excuse for self-glorification or showing off, but I know that I have gotten caught up in the spirit of the moment and even though there were complaints, there were also people who said that it was an extra-special moment for them, too. Try not to be too hard on us, it WILL happen to you some day (and you will probably love it, at least I hope you do).   bruce cornely o o o __________ o o o ago (dean) ohs o o __________ o o  
(back) Subject: Re: Postlude showing off From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Mon, 2 Feb 1998 23:32:45 -0500   When I was a chorister at Christ Church Cathedral--Houston, some of the most exquisite moments of worship came after the recessional hymn when William Barnard would play an absolutely glorious quiet improvisation. Each time I worship I thank God for the time I was privileged to spend in Barnard's choir and as a student of his.   bruce cornely o o o __________ o o o ago (dean) ohs o o __________ o o  
(back) Subject: Re: Helping Congregations to Sing (Was Re: Upsetting the congregation) From: Jim H <BALD1@prodigy.net> Date: Mon, 25 Aug 1997 19:53:20 -0500   John L. Speller wrote: > > At 06:51 PM 1/30/98, Shirley wrote: > Too slow, and your congregation has to take too many > >breaths, they lose interest. > > >Are there other theories out there what could help a non-singing > >congregation to open their mouths and make a joyful noise? > > > > John, in a sunny 65 degree St. Louis, Missouri. > Amazing, 65 Degrees in MO this time of year.   I am not sure of all hymnals, but The Lutheran Hymnal, also called the blue hymnal, not to be confused with Lutheran Worship, which is also blue, has a set of numbers underneath the title of each hymn. They will read something like, 7 7 7 6 7 7, 8 7 8 7, etc. These are suggested phrasings for congregational singing for that particular song. If your hymnal utilizes this, it is a very good guideline, especially for the beginning organist. Using these give the congregation a chance to breath. All the organist need to do is pause so slightly at the end of each phrase. The pause should not be so long that it is considered a rest. Just a break in the music.   This is not the entire formula, but it is a start.   Jim H.   > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: Re: Correction From: Jim H <BALD1@prodigy.net> Date: Mon, 25 Aug 1997 20:05:33 -0500   Wildhirt, Richard wrote: > > Stephan F P Karr wrote: > > A > > "There is nothing remarkable about it. All one has to do is hit the > right notes at the right time, and the instrument plays itself." -- J. > S. Bach > And he could say that.   Jim > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: Re: Helping Congregations to Sing (Was Re: Upsetting the congregation) From: Jim H <BALD1@prodigy.net> Date: Mon, 25 Aug 1997 20:03:30 -0500   Shirley wrote: > > About "improvising" on the final stanza of a hymn: > > If you're feeling particularly unoriginal, try: > > "New Settings of Twenty Well-Known Hymn Tunes" by Dale Wood > "Free Organ Accompaniments with Descants", > Augsburg Publishing House > > > --Shirley > >Shirley: > Have you tried creating your own improvs? Cakewalk has an excellent >software program. It is a little expensive, but when compared to >buying several books, it is cheaper.   >I also find it quite entertaining to arrange my own improvs. The only >problem is I usually have to spend several hours practicing my own >arrangements before I can play them. But it is fun>   Jim H. > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: Cadet Chapel, WP: 8 Feb - Band & Organ Concert (Cross-posted) From: patmai@juno.com (Patricia R. Maimone) Date: Mon, 2 Feb 1998 23:25:50 -0500   Hope that some of you can attend..   Pat Maimone   UNITED STATES MILITARY ACADEMY BAND West Point, New York     /- /- /- /- /- - - - - - - - -\ -\ -\ -\ -\ / \ T H E O R G A N S Y M P H O N Y \ / \- \- \- \- \- - - - - - - - -/ -/ -/ -/ -/   The United States Military Academy Concert Band and organist Lee Dettra will perform the Finale from Camille Saint-Saens' Symphony No. 3 (Organ Symphony) in the West Point, NY, Cadet Chapel, on Sunday, February 8th, at 3:30 p.m. Arrive early to get a good seat (and to park anywhere near the chapel) for this free event.   The concert will open with Mr. Dettra and the band performing the Feierlicher Einzug (Solemn Procession), by Richard Strauss; and sustain the majestic tone with the Vetrate di chiesa (Church Windows), by Ottorini Respighi. The band will then perform On a Hymnsong of Philip Bliss, by David Holsinger; and feature Staff Sergeant MaryKay Messenger singing the world premiere of Four American Gospel Songs, arranged by Luigi Zaninelli. Max Reger's Introduction and Passacaglia will showcase Mr. Dettra on organ alone; and the brass and percussion will join him to perform the West Point Bicentennial commission Legacies of Honor, by Bert Truax. The powerful segment from the Organ Symphony will be the afternoon's final offering.   For concert information, cancellations and updates call the Academy Band's 24 hour concert information line at (914) 938-2617. or find us on the World Wide Web at http://www.usma.army.mil/band/   All concerts by the U.S. Military Academy Band are free and open to the public.   Trefethen Donald SSG <yd1981@staff.usma.army.mil>       _____________________________________________________________________ You don't need to buy Internet access to use free Internet e-mail. Get completely free e-mail from Juno at http://www.juno.com Or call Juno at (800) 654-JUNO [654-5866]