PipeChat Digest #235 - Thursday, February 5, 1998
 
PASADENA ORGAN...speaking of!
  by <steve.lamanna@tavsnet.com>
Re:PASADENA ORGAN...speaking of!
  by <steve.lamanna@tavsnet.com>
Re: T.O. Pipework facades?
  by bruce cornely <cremona84000@webtv.net>
Re: ot: the ghost and mr. chicken
  by Randolph Runyon <runyonr@po.muohio.edu>
Re:PASADENA ORGAN...speaking of!
  by bruce cornely <cremona84000@webtv.net>
V Epiphany, Church of the Advent
  by Ken <mewzishn@spec.net>
Re[2]:PASADENA ORGAN...speaking of!
  by <steve.lamanna@tavsnet.com>
Re: Re[2]:PASADENA ORGAN...speaking of!
  by bruce cornely <cremona84000@webtv.net>
Re:PASADENA ORGAN...speaking of!
  by Bob Loesch <rrloesch@jps.net>
Re: Postlude Showing Off
  by Jim H <BALD1@prodigy.net>
Re: Sound Cluster (was Postlude Showing Off)
  by Vernon Moeller <vernonm@ccsi.com>
Pregnant Pauses
  by Vernon Moeller <vernonm@ccsi.com>
Re: Pregnant Pauses
  by Ken <mewzishn@spec.net>
Re: Pregnant Pauses
  by Bob Loesch <rrloesch@jps.net>
British Comedy
  by Judy A. Ollikkala <71431.2534@compuserve.com>
Re: British Comedy
  by Kevin M. Simons <Kevin.M.Simons-1@ou.edu>
Re: British Comedy
  by Richard Wolf <floww@webtv.net>
Re: British Comedy
  by Richard Wolf <floww@webtv.net>
One person four hands
  by Judy A. Ollikkala <71431.2534@compuserve.com>
Re: Pregnant Pauses
  by Judy A. Ollikkala <71431.2534@compuserve.com>
Re: British Comedy
  by Judy A. Ollikkala <71431.2534@compuserve.com>
Re: Pregnant Pauses
  by Stanley E Yoder <syoder+@andrew.cmu.edu>
Re: Pregnant Pauses
  by Randolph Runyon <runyonr@po.muohio.edu>
Re: Postlude Showing Off
  by Kevin Cartwright <kevin1@alaweb.com>
Re: T.O. Pipework facades?
  by Kevin Cartwright <kevin1@alaweb.com>
Re: T.O. Pipework facades?
  by Otto Pebworth <opebwrth@gte.net>
Re: British Comedy
  by Kevin Cartwright <kevin1@alaweb.com>
Re: British Comedy
  by Kevin Cartwright <kevin1@alaweb.com>
Re: British Comedy
  by Kevin Cartwright <kevin1@alaweb.com>
Re: Hub Organ
  by Robert Rusczyk <rusczyk@ix.netcom.com>
"Diapason"
  by Kevin Cartwright <kevin1@alaweb.com>
Re: "Diapason"
  by Richard Wolf <floww@webtv.net>
Re: Hub Organ
  by Richard Wolf <floww@webtv.net>
Re: "Diapason"
  by <DudelK@aol.com>
Re: "Diapason"
  by John L. Speller <jlspeller@stlnet.com>
 


(back) Subject: PASADENA ORGAN...speaking of! From: steve.lamanna@tavsnet.com Date: Thu, 05 Feb 98 07:34:08 -0500     Hi list...   I just rec'd the latest Banda recording...a double CD of George Wright at the Rialto at Pasadena done, I think, during the late 50's or early 60's...   The material is previously unreleased, and Terry Cutshall and his crew have done a fine job with re-mastering of the old tapes...   The CD's are a combination of live and empty theatre sessions. And, Terry has taken care not to jam the recordings with endless applause.   The playing is inspired, and I am still in awe how George gets so much out of a 2/10? (or 11)...   Terry indicated that he is readying the next release, which will be on the newly enhanced home instillation of George's.   Which brings me to my question, where is that instillation today?   Steve LaManna      
(back) Subject: Re:PASADENA ORGAN...speaking of! From: steve.lamanna@tavsnet.com Date: Thu, 05 Feb 98 07:50:35 -0500     Hi again list....   I was unclear, (as usual), in my last posting..   I meant to ask where the Rialto Pasadena organ is today....NOT George's home instillation...which, of course, is right where is should be!   Red-faced,   Steve LaManna      
(back) Subject: Re: T.O. Pipework facades? From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Thu, 5 Feb 1998 08:03:24 -0500   Kevin, I expect that the function of theatre organ pipe facades is different from those of classical organs, but I will offer this for your consideration. In an instrument, especially where congregational singing is being led, the facade location gives the pipes the best advantage for speaking position, so that, rather than a visual reason, a tonal reason exists for having pipes in the facade. My experience has brought me to the point where I consider it extremely important for the 8 Principal to be in the most prominent position in the organ since it is the most important. This allows it a presence that is maximized by the facade position. I cite three examples of Principal location. The best of the three is a 3/52 Visser/Rowland at Holy Trinity Episcopal Church--Gainesville FL which is very fortunate to have 8 Principal on both the Great and the Positiv; the case has two facades--one faceing the nave (P) the other the choir (G). In recitals and services it is obvious when the Principal faceing you is playing (depending upon where you are sitting). The singing (!) quality and distinct top voice is ever- present and use as a solo stop is quite distinctive. The second example is an 1868 Jardine 2/10 at Trinity Episcopal Church, Shelburne VT, the facade of which consists of 1-17 of the 8 Open Diapason, 18 an up being directly behind the facade and speaking between the feet of the facade (the pipe mouths are slightly above impost level). Again, the presence is distinctive, although very slightly diminished by just the few inches (12") they are recessed behind the facade. The third example is a 1982 Moller 2/21 in which the Great Principal is place not only behind the 16 Principal (ped) but in the middle of the windchest. The Great is situated on top of the Swell in "werkprinizip" fashion. It does not project cleanly into the room and lack the distinct "line" which the other two possess. This is especially evident when playing an 8' cantus firmus and using, alternately, the Great Principal coupled to the pedals, and the Pedal 8' Octave which is in the facade (ext of 16'). Just as an "aside" I would mention here that my favorite pipes for visual effect in a facade are the tall, slender pipes of a Violone, as at the National Cathedral (W-DC), and I have seen smaller organ achieve the visual effect of height by using Dulcianas to great visual advantage. I guess if one wanted to be "naughty" that forced lengths could achieve this effect also.   bruce cornely o o o __________ o o o ago (dean) ohs o o __________ o o  
(back) Subject: Re: ot: the ghost and mr. chicken From: runyonr@po.muohio.edu (Randolph Runyon) Date: Thu, 5 Feb 1998 08:12:11 -0500   =ABThe first song I play all of the time, but I don't know >what it is called! :( I know it was a battle song around the 15th or >16th century. =BB     The "Agincourt Hymn," perhaps?   Randy Runyon runyonr@muohio.edu Organist and Music Director, Norwood Christian Church (Cincinnati, OH) Professor of French, Miami University (Oxford, OH)      
(back) Subject: Re:PASADENA ORGAN...speaking of! From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Thu, 5 Feb 1998 08:28:57 -0500   George's home instillation....   SHHHHHHH! There might be Fed's spying!   bruce cornely o o o __________ o o o ago (dean) ohs o o __________ o o  
(back) Subject: V Epiphany, Church of the Advent From: Ken <mewzishn@spec.net> Date: Thu, 05 Feb 1998 08:43:40 +0000   Church of the Advent, Westbury, New York The Rev'd Jeffrey H. Krantz, Rector Kenneth L. Sybesma, Choirmaster and Organist   8 February 1998, V Epiphany   Voluntary at the Gathering, “Onder een linde groen” Jan Pieterzoon Sweelinck Pealing of the Bells Hymn at the Entrance Procession 535, Paderborn “Ye servants of God” Canticle 20 S-280, Powell “Glory to God” Psalm 85.7-13, Anglican chant Hymn before the Gospel 661, Georgetown “They cast their nets in Galilee”   Anthem at the Presentation, “Come, Thou Fount” early American folk tune Hymn at the Preparation 653, Repton “Dear Lord and Father of mankind” Preface Dialogue S-120, Plainchant “The Lord be with you” Preface Acclamation S-129, Powell “Holy” Concluding Acclamation S-142, Plainchant “Amen” Lord’s Prayer S-119, Plainchant, adapt. Douglas Fraction Anthem S-163, Powell “Lamb of God” Voluntary at the Communion, “Adagio (Opus 11)” Samuel Barber Hymn at the Retiring Procession 537, Moscow “Christ for the world we sing!” Voluntary after the Dismissal, “Hymne d’Agincourt” John Dunstable        
(back) Subject: Re[2]:PASADENA ORGAN...speaking of! From: steve.lamanna@tavsnet.com Date: Thu, 05 Feb 98 08:50:46 -0500     Bruce....   Are you suggesting there may be a tax issue on some celestes?   :-)   Steve LaManna      
(back) Subject: Re: Re[2]:PASADENA ORGAN...speaking of! From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Thu, 5 Feb 1998 09:18:22 -0500   >tax issue on celestes   Only if the "instillation" makes them too heavenly!   bruce cornely o o o __________ o o o ago (dean) ohs o o __________ o o  
(back) Subject: Re:PASADENA ORGAN...speaking of! From: Bob Loesch <rrloesch@jps.net> Date: Thu, 05 Feb 1998 06:45:31 -0800   At 07:50 2/5/98 -0500, steve.lamanna@tavsnet.com wrote: > >Hi again list.... > >I was unclear, (as usual), in my last posting.. > >I meant to ask where the Rialto Pasadena organ is today....NOT George's home >instillation...which, of course, is right where is should be!   The console, relay, Viols, Bourdon, and Diaphone are in storage awaiting installation in my home. The rest of the Main was sold by the previous owner's estate. The entire Solo (Tuba, Post Horn, Orch. Oboe, Vox, & Tibia) was destroyed in a fire in the theatre.   _________________________________ Regards, | | | U U U U U | Bob | U UUUUU U | | U _______________ U | | U _______________ U | | U _______________ U |      
(back) Subject: Re: Postlude Showing Off From: Jim H <BALD1@prodigy.net> Date: Tue, 26 Aug 1997 01:50:15 -0500   Glenda wrote: > > I've read all these postings with interest, and at the risk of sounding > > > when a good booming piece (a real "call to worship", if you will) can very > well be a prelude, > > Glenda Sutton > I agree with you Glenda. But, I still feel it is best to mix it up. I usually do four to five pieces for a prelude. I will start with the softer one and work up to an upbeat piece. An example of one of my preludes:   Jesu, Joy of Man's Desiring, Bach Soft The Lord's Prayer Mallotte Soft crescendo to full, but low volume Toccatto No 32 The Leurermberg Collection Soft, Loud, soft Now Thank We all Our God Bach Loud A Mighty Fortress is Our God Luther Trumpet Fanfare, Loud, upbeat First Hymn   Jim H. > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: Re: Sound Cluster (was Postlude Showing Off) From: Vernon Moeller <vernonm@ccsi.com> Date: Thu, 05 Feb 1998 08:51:45 -0600   >> Once played a piece entitled "Sound Cluster" for a postlude. It involved >> all the 16' and some 8' pedal (no 32' on ye ol' Allen), and beginning with >> low C.... a measure later, it added C#.... and then D.... all three pedals >> at the same time. The manuals had similar patterns. :) >> {snip!} >> --Shirley (maiden name was Hannum) > >Where could I get this thing?? > >Thanks! > >Kevin C. >kevin1@alaweb.com   It's in a Lorenz publication called "Encore!", I think. As I recall, "Sound Cluster" came right before the last number in the book, called "Sinfonia on Abdelazer," which is an all-too-short setting of the main theme from Britten's "Young Person's Guide to the Orchestra," I'm pretty sure. I think that book also has a setting of St Denio in it that's pretty easy, as well as a nice piece showing the difference between various flutes on the organ.   I can picture the book right now, as if it was in front of me, even though it's at home in my music filing cabinet. Hope I'm right about all this - I'm pretty sure of it.   \/\/\    
(back) Subject: Pregnant Pauses From: Vernon Moeller <vernonm@ccsi.com> Date: Thu, 05 Feb 1998 09:03:26 -0600   Bob Loesch wrote:   >I simply gradually >increased the volume (which caused the ladies to increase THEIRS) until I >reached a crescendo and then stopped playing for a LONG rest. The >congregation was treated to "...I EAT MINE WITH MUSTARD..." Needless to >say, the offenders were surprisingly quiet for several Sundays...   Very funny!     I've found the best piece for doing that sort of thing is Franck's Piece Heroique; the final section plays really loud music for several bars and then stops for a full measure. This "method" happens 3 or 4 times as I recall. This was extremely gratifying to me, because I have a long-standing "argument", if you will, with the pastor regarding how to start a service (I think he should come in, say a few words to quiet the masses, and let the prelude be an actual part of the service; he just wants to come in at the end of the prelude). Anyway, I played the PH for Christ the King Sunday last November, and at the end, the congregation was really loud by the time I reached the first pause. You wouldn't believe how quickly they realized that I had stopped; then I started in again, and their volume quickly rose only to be cut off in mid-stream when I reached another pause. It was funny as heck, and I couldn't stop smiling by the time I reached the end.   Anybody know any other pieces that do the same sort of thing?   \/\/\    
(back) Subject: Re: Pregnant Pauses From: Ken <mewzishn@spec.net> Date: Thu, 05 Feb 1998 10:43:06 +0000   Vernon Moeller wrote:   > Anybody know any other pieces that do the same sort of thing?   A trifle more difficult than Piece Heroique -- and not exactly what many might consider material for organ music to precede a service of worship -- is Durufle's "Toccata" from Suite, Op. 5, which has about 2/3 or 3/4 of the way through a spot that's very effectively rendered with a sort of a stop'n'start feel before it just pretty much takes off like a farm animal with lighted firecrackers tied to its tail.   Ken Sybesma        
(back) Subject: Re: Pregnant Pauses From: Bob Loesch <rrloesch@jps.net> Date: Thu, 05 Feb 1998 08:31:23 -0800   At 09:03 2/5/98 -0600, Vernon Moeller wrote: >the first pause. You wouldn't believe how quickly they realized that >I had stopped; then I started in again, and their volume quickly rose >only to be cut off in mid-stream when I reached another pause. It >was funny as heck, and I couldn't stop smiling by the time I reached >the end. > >Anybody know any other pieces that do the same sort of thing?   One comes to mind, "Festival Toccatta", but the composer eludes me at this time. Starts out with a series of full chords alternating l & r hands, quite loud, then a dramatic pause...I'll have to dig through my files...     Regards,   Bob        
(back) Subject: British Comedy From: "Judy A. Ollikkala" <71431.2534@compuserve.com> Date: Thu, 5 Feb 1998 12:40:59 -0500   My favorite and only British "comedy" which unfortunately just went off public TV, is "Waiting For God". This is a classic. There was a "pipe organ" in the last episode which had a double wedding and a funeral going on at the same time in a small stone country church. The organist was playing the Widor Toccata on a two manual electronic appearing console at the end of the episode, which sounded like a pipe organ recording!!  
(back) Subject: Re: British Comedy From: "Kevin M. Simons" <Kevin.M.Simons-1@ou.edu> Date: Thu, 05 Feb 1998 11:55:34 -0600   Judy A. Ollikkala wrote: > > My favorite and only British "comedy" which unfortunately just went off > public TV, is "Waiting For God". This is a classic. There was a "pipe > organ" in the last episode which had a double wedding and a funeral going > on at the same time in a small stone country church. The organist was > playing the Widor Toccata on a two manual electronic appearing console at > the end of the episode, which sounded like a pipe organ recording!! >   I still watch Waiting for God on public TV here in OK. Its actually pretty funny but I like Are you Being Served? and Keeping Up Appearances better, though.   Now, back to your regularly scheduled organic chatter.   Kevin M. Simons  
(back) Subject: Re: British Comedy From: floww@webtv.net (Richard Wolf) Date: Thu, 5 Feb 1998 12:25:40 -0600   I also enjoy British comdy, As far as pipe organs in movies,it is discouriging and discusting to see a pipe organ in a grand setting only yo hear a thin nasal tone of an electronic.{usually a Hammond} Did you see and hear the organ in Interview With A Vampire/   Dick  
(back) Subject: Re: British Comedy From: floww@webtv.net (Richard Wolf) Date: Thu, 5 Feb 1998 12:29:30 -0600   Note: I play better than I type.  
(back) Subject: One person four hands From: "Judy A. Ollikkala" <71431.2534@compuserve.com> Date: Thu, 5 Feb 1998 14:14:51 -0500   I agree with Glenda's note on Jane Parker-Smith, she played a wow of a recital at the NYC National AGO Convention last year. Go hear her if she plays near you, or book her for a convention!! I believe she is from England.  
(back) Subject: Re: Pregnant Pauses From: "Judy A. Ollikkala" <71431.2534@compuserve.com> Date: Thu, 5 Feb 1998 14:14:46 -0500   The BACH Liszt piece also does have a very soft spot near the end, but again, that is not a Prelude piece! Thank goodness I don't have that problem in the Episcopal church where I am playing!  
(back) Subject: Re: British Comedy From: "Judy A. Ollikkala" <71431.2534@compuserve.com> Date: Thu, 5 Feb 1998 14:26:50 -0500   No, I didn't see the Vampire movie. But I wish "Waiting for God" was still on, even reruns.  
(back) Subject: Re: Pregnant Pauses From: Stanley E Yoder <syoder+@andrew.cmu.edu> Date: Thu, 5 Feb 1998 14:44:16 -0500 (EST)   You could always play a Bruckner symphony: lotsa 'luftpausen', though dunno if they're 'pregnant'. Of course, the service wouldn't be over until midnight. Stan Yoder Pittsburgh  
(back) Subject: Re: Pregnant Pauses From: runyonr@po.muohio.edu (Randolph Runyon) Date: Thu, 5 Feb 1998 16:42:41 -0500     >One comes to mind, "Festival Toccatta", but the composer eludes me at this >time. Starts out with a series of full chords alternating l & r hands, >quite loud, then a dramatic pause...I'll have to dig through my files... > > >Regards, > >Bob > > That would be Percy Fletcher.   Randy Runyon runyonr@muohio.edu Organist and Music Director, Norwood Christian Church (Cincinnati, OH) Professor of French, Miami University (Oxford, OH)      
(back) Subject: Re: Postlude Showing Off From: Kevin Cartwright <kevin1@alaweb.com> Date: Thu, 05 Feb 1998 17:21:34 -0600   FireAlarmz@aol.com wrote: > > Kevin C: > > March of the ASTRONAUTS ?? Hee-hee, ha-ha. You are kidding, no? If not, what > does it sound like? > > Bill Miller Trenton NJ   Its kind of a "run of the mill" piano solo piece from the level 3 piano book. But, when you add things, take some out, and convert it to an organ fanfare, it sounds really nice. I even thought about asking the composer if I could put it in writing.   Really, it did sound pretty nice after I got through with it.   For now,   Kevin C. kevin1@alaweb.com  
(back) Subject: Re: T.O. Pipework facades? From: Kevin Cartwright <kevin1@alaweb.com> Date: Thu, 05 Feb 1998 17:41:41 -0600   The one at the Episcopal Church has a facade of Open Diapason 8'. Ours, however, has the 8' open diap. (Spitz Prinzipal 8') in the center of the great organ, and the pipes in front of it are spaced further apart, so it still speaks at a nice volume (but not too loud). The only difference is that the St. Thomas organ (Episcopal) has a few false pipes, and the Methodist organ (mine) doesn't. I like mine better.   For now,   Kevin C. kevin1@alaweb.com   bruce cornely wrote: > > Kevin, > I expect that the function of theatre organ pipe facades is different > from those of classical organs, but I will offer this for your > consideration. In an instrument, especially where congregational > singing is being led, the facade location gives the pipes the best > advantage for speaking position, so that, rather than a visual reason, a > tonal reason exists for having pipes in the facade. My experience has > brought me to the point where I consider it extremely important for the > 8 Principal to be in the most prominent position in the organ since it > is the most important. This allows it a presence that is maximized by > the facade position. I cite three examples of Principal location. > The best of the three is a 3/52 Visser/Rowland at Holy Trinity Episcopal > Church--Gainesville FL which is very fortunate to have 8 Principal on > both the Great and the Positiv; the case has two facades--one faceing > the nave (P) the other the choir (G). In recitals and services it is > obvious when the Principal faceing you is playing (depending upon where > you are sitting). The singing (!) quality and distinct top voice is > ever- present and use as a solo stop is quite distinctive. The second > example is an 1868 Jardine 2/10 at Trinity Episcopal Church, Shelburne > VT, the facade of which consists of 1-17 of the 8 Open Diapason, 18 an > up being directly behind the facade and speaking between the feet of the > facade (the pipe mouths are slightly above impost level). Again, the > presence is distinctive, although very slightly diminished by just the > few inches (12") they are recessed behind the facade. The third example > is a 1982 Moller 2/21 in which the Great Principal is place not only > behind the 16 Principal (ped) but in the middle of the windchest. The > Great is situated on top of the Swell in "werkprinizip" fashion. It > does not project cleanly into the room and lack the distinct "line" > which the other two possess. This is especially evident when playing an > 8' cantus firmus and using, alternately, the Great Principal coupled to > the pedals, and the Pedal 8' Octave which is in the facade (ext of 16'). > Just as an "aside" I would mention here that my favorite pipes for > visual effect in a facade are the tall, slender pipes of a Violone, as > at the National Cathedral (W-DC), and I have seen smaller organ achieve > the visual effect of height by using Dulcianas to great visual > advantage. I guess if one wanted to be "naughty" that forced lengths > could achieve this effect also. > > bruce cornely o o o __________ o o o > ago (dean) ohs o o __________ o o  
(back) Subject: Re: T.O. Pipework facades? From: Otto Pebworth <opebwrth@gte.net> Date: Thu, 05 Feb 1998 18:57:11 -0500   Kevin Cartwright wrote: > > The one at the Episcopal Church has a facade of Open Diapason 8'. Ours, > however, has the 8' open diap. (Spitz Prinzipal 8') in the center of the > great organ, and the pipes in front of it are spaced further apart, so > it still speaks at a nice volume (but not too loud). The only > difference is that the St. Thomas organ (Episcopal) has a few false > pipes, and the Methodist organ (mine) doesn't. I like mine better.     ---> I used to maintain an instrument that had a "Principal" (read *Gemshorn*) across the back wall of the church, of which the Swell and Great were directly behind (side-by-side). It was wonderful to have to be able to "toss" the pitch across when tuning...  
(back) Subject: Re: British Comedy From: Kevin Cartwright <kevin1@alaweb.com> Date: Thu, 05 Feb 1998 17:55:47 -0600   I was taking the time to watch "Are You Being Served?" one day (that newer version where they are out in the country running that hotel...not a really regular viewer, but I think it was something like "Are You Being Served?...Again"). Anyway, they had to do a wedding in the chapel, and there was a lovely pipe organ with manual wind power that one of them played. I asked around, and heard that was actual person really playing the actual pipe organ.   Just something to say...   Kevin C. kevin1@alaweb.com   Judy A. Ollikkala wrote: > > My favorite and only British "comedy" which unfortunately just went off > public TV, is "Waiting For God". This is a classic. There was a "pipe > organ" in the last episode which had a double wedding and a funeral going > on at the same time in a small stone country church. The organist was > playing the Widor Toccata on a two manual electronic appearing console at > the end of the episode, which sounded like a pipe organ recording!!  
(back) Subject: Re: British Comedy From: Kevin Cartwright <kevin1@alaweb.com> Date: Thu, 05 Feb 1998 17:56:57 -0600   > Its actually > pretty funny but I like Are you Being Served? and Keeping Up Appearances > better, though.   "Keeping Up Appearances" is my favorite of the three.   Kevin C.  
(back) Subject: Re: British Comedy From: Kevin Cartwright <kevin1@alaweb.com> Date: Thu, 05 Feb 1998 17:58:17 -0600   Richard Wolf wrote: > > Note: I play better than I type.   You too, huh?   Kevin C.  
(back) Subject: Re: Hub Organ From: rusczyk@ix.netcom.com (Robert Rusczyk) Date: Thu, 5 Feb 1998 18:10:33 -0600 (CST)   FYI,   The Hub organ was under full expression. Its the Oaks Park Rink (Portland) that is without expression.....         You wrote: > >I am presently listening to a tape of >Freddie Arnish {spelling?} playing the > Hub organ. It is a great and swell sound. >He does a marvelous job without swell >shutters. > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >    
(back) Subject: "Diapason" From: Kevin Cartwright <kevin1@alaweb.com> Date: Thu, 05 Feb 1998 18:16:46 -0600   I have seen several references to the "Diapason" in several organ catalogs. Does anyone know how I could subscribe to this??   Any help would be appreciated.   Kevin Cartwright Greenville, Alabama kevin1@alaweb.com  
(back) Subject: Re: "Diapason" From: floww@webtv.net (Richard Wolf) Date: Thu, 5 Feb 1998 18:34:10 -0600   A short time ago a free issue was offered on the list. I didn't save the message.Hopefully some other member still has the message.  
(back) Subject: Re: Hub Organ From: floww@webtv.net (Richard Wolf) Date: Thu, 5 Feb 1998 18:49:03 -0600   Sorry about organ being without expression. I was misinformed by an ex rink organist.     Dick  
(back) Subject: Re: "Diapason" From: DudelK@aol.com Date: Thu, 5 Feb 1998 19:50:03 EST   Subscriptions are $20 for 1 year -- The Diapason 380 E. Northwest Hwy Des Plaines, IL 60016-2282   They're very good about sending sample copies to interested parties.  
(back) Subject: Re: "Diapason" From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com> Date: Thu, 5 Feb 1998 18:57:38 -0600 (CST)   At 06:16 PM 2/5/98 -0600, Kevin Cartwright wrote:   >I have seen several references to the "Diapason" in several organ >catalogs. Does anyone know how I could subscribe to this??   The latest (February 1998) issue contains the following information inside the back cover:   Address for subscriptions: The Diapason, 380 E. Northwest Highway, Des Plaines, IL 60016-2282   Subscriptions: 1 year $20.00; 2 years $30.00; 3 years $40.00. (Overseas subscriptions: 1 year $30.00; 2 years $45.00; 3 years $60.00)   Thet ask you to state your name and address and whether it is a renewal or a new subscription, and to enclose the appropriate remittance. "Please allow four weeks for delivery of first issue on new subscriptions."   Hope this helps,   John.