PipeChat Digest #242 - Saturday, February 7, 1998
 
Re: 2nd Baptist, Houston
  by <SCoonrod@aol.com>
Re: Church music repertoire
  by Patricia R. Maimone <patmai@juno.com>
Prelude length (Was Re: Postludes, preludes, and showing off)
  by Shirley <pnst@itw.com>
Re: PipeChat Digest #234 - 02/05/98 Reggie in jail
  by Nelson and Tracy Denton <ndenton434@bigwave.ca>
Reginald Foort - Touring organ
  by Robert Shumway <rshumway@iamerica.net>
Re: Prelude length (Was Re: Postludes, preludes, and showing  off)
  by Beau Surratt <beaupiano@earthlink.net>
Re: Play REUBKE on a SCHLICKER? (was Re:	 Pregnant	Pauses      & Fletcher
  by Ken <mewzishn@spec.net>
Re: Postludes, preludes, and showing off
  by Beau Surratt <beaupiano@earthlink.net>
Re: PipeChat Digest #234 - 02/05/98
  by Kevin Cartwright <kevin1@alaweb.com>
Re: PipeChat Digest #234 - 02/05/98
  by Kevin Cartwright <kevin1@alaweb.com>
Re: Cadet Chapel Concerts - West Point, NY (Cross Posted)
  by Kevin Cartwright <kevin1@alaweb.com>
Re: TO on the radio
  by Kevin Cartwright <kevin1@alaweb.com>
Re: Ideal
  by Kevin Cartwright <kevin1@alaweb.com>
Re: Postludes, preludes, and showing off
  by Kevin Cartwright <kevin1@alaweb.com>
Re: Prelude length (Was Re: Postludes, preludes, and showing off)
  by Kevin Cartwright <kevin1@alaweb.com>
Re: Prelude length (Was Re: Postludes, preludes, and showing  off)
  by Kevin Cartwright <kevin1@alaweb.com>
Re: Prelude length (Was Re: Postludes, preludes, and showing off)
  by <CDKrug@aol.com>
Re: Reginald Foort - Touring organ
  by Stanley Lowkis <nstarfil@mediaone.net>
Re: ot: the ghost and mr. chicken organ.
  by Sean Haley <newgershwin@hotmail.com>
Piano/Organ Duets (Was Re: 4-Hand Pieces)
  by Patricia R. Maimone <patmai@juno.com>
Searching for new organ/handbell/choral literature
  by gregory@mke.earthreach.com <gregory@mke.earthreach.com>
 


(back) Subject: Re: 2nd Baptist, Houston From: SCoonrod@aol.com Date: Sat, 7 Feb 1998 17:56:42 EST   As I recall it is a 194 rank 5 manual instrument with perhaps a small bit of electronic augmentation, but I would not call it an electronic organ. It has two divisions of chamades and I believe a 32' Principal in the facade.  
(back) Subject: Re: Church music repertoire From: patmai@juno.com (Patricia R. Maimone) Date: Sat, 7 Feb 1998 18:36:17 -0500   Dear Shirley, et al -   >>One of the best ways I find is to go to a church musician program   >I need to get back in the swing of things again.... is there a website >for this? Hmm. I do not know about a website..perhaps eventually under the AGO's..   http://www.agohq.org/   (Thanks to Stan Lowkis for posting that URL earlier!) Perhaps the Presbyterians have a website... There is an Association of Lutheran Musicians.. Fellowship of Baptist Musicians.. There is probably one for Methodists, also..   > How would I get info? For now, check the DIAPASON, which carries a list of workshops a few months before they happen.. Summer workshops would (probably) be mentioned in March, April, May.. as long as the publicity person is on the ball ;-) Herb Huestis has been offering a free copy of the most recent issue of the DIAPASON .. Watch the list(s) for the contents of the next one..   Do you subscribe to the DIAPASON or TAO? The latter carries ads for special workshops.. such as one on Vierne in San Diego Feb 21-22, if I remember correctly.. Your church in Abingdon, PA, is near Philadelphia, correct? I have attended a couple of workshops at Trinity Episcopal Church in Ambler, PA, sponsored by .Augsburg Fortress. which has a _marvelous_ two day workshop in August. (One may attend for one or two days..) Sometimes they have a one day event in January, also. There you can find new as well as old -- Organ music, organ and choir music, organ accompaniment for vocalists, organ accompaniment for instrumentalists, anthems including organ and handbells. Michael Burkhardt played his own and others' new church organ music one year.   How close are you to Princeton, NJ? Westminster Choir College's bookstore has a fine selection of organ music.. The Princeton University store has some, also.   If for any reason you cannot leave your home territory, I second Karen's motion of calling for the demo cassette audiotapes from Morning Star. They would make a good supplement to the others, also!   Best regards.   Pat Maimone   _____________________________________________________________________ You don't need to buy Internet access to use free Internet e-mail. Get completely free e-mail from Juno at http://www.juno.com Or call Juno at (800) 654-JUNO [654-5866]    
(back) Subject: Prelude length (Was Re: Postludes, preludes, and showing off) From: Shirley <pnst@itw.com> Date: Sat, 07 Feb 1998 18:45:12   At 17:24 02/07/98 -0500, you wrote:   >Any comments about the length of time available in various churches for >preludes?   The organist is also responsible for accompanying the choirs at our church. He meets with the choir (and their director) about a half hour before the service starts. He usually leaves us about 8 before the hour to get started on his prelude... presumably, he takes about 5 minutes for it. (We have a historical bell that the organist is responsible for tolling [by throwing a switch] for about a minute or minute and a half before the prelude as well.)   I've been in churches where the announcements precede the Prelude... didn't like it too much, though....   Have also been in worship services where the minister is in the chancel the same time as the organist. When the organist is ready, the minister says a few quieting words to the congregation. Doesn't help, though, when he leaves again to return just as the prelude is ending....   Support from the pulpit is everything.   --Shirley  
(back) Subject: Re: PipeChat Digest #234 - 02/05/98 Reggie in jail From: Nelson and Tracy Denton <ndenton434@bigwave.ca> Date: Sat, 07 Feb 1998 20:05:50 -0500   >Duncan Charig wrote: >> A little story about Reginald Foort. He used to give organ recitals on the BBC during the early years of World War II. He was eventually arrested and put in the Tower of London on a charge of spying. It was said that he transmitted code in his organ playing. I don't think this was ever proved, however he died not long after.     I've heard this story too. If I remember the details correctly it was a good friend, the late Frank Olsen who used to tell this tale. Frank was an organist along with Reggie at the BBC. I can't remember which one of the two who was arrested for spying but the story goes this way.   During the war everyone was so worried about spies that even the music played on the BBC was checked for hidden codes in the music. The musicians had to write out their arrangements and then have them checked by the guys at millitary intelligence to make sure no "morse code" was hidden in the music's rhythm. One night Reggie or Frank was playing Reggie's "traveling organ" at the BBC live and the organ developed a cypher. In a panic the organist switched keys and continued to play in the cyphering key ( what else would you do eh?) Immediatey the switch was noticed by those in charge of listening for such things and the cops,military police and spycatchers swarmed into the studios, arresting everybody in sight for "treason - most foul". It took a fair bit of explaning and a long talk with everybody connected to the organ trade to straighten out the mess.   This might help explain some of the tendency of British organists and other musicians to play pop music in a very strict tempo without any improvisation during the war years.   Frank collapsed and died a few years ago while playing his opening trademark number ( A Wee Deoch An' Doris) before a packed house in England.         Nelson E. Denton R. A. Denton and Son Pipe Organ Builders Hamilton Ontario Canada   http://www.freeyellow.com/members/radentonson  
(back) Subject: Reginald Foort - Touring organ From: Robert Shumway <rshumway@iamerica.net> Date: Sat, 07 Feb 1998 19:25:36 -0600   I must have missed something - regretfully. Stan could I ask why this organ is considered controversial? I really would like to know. I thought that everything that could be written about it has been written.   Reggie had the idea for the travling organ and could get no British organ builder to undertake the job. Only Moller was willing to try. The design of the organ was unique in that it was planned so that the entire organ did not have to be used. If one of the small theatres did not have the room for the whole organ they simply installed as much of it as would fit. Because of the many various voltages and frequencies encountered Reggie carried along 10 (!!!) blowers and always had at least one that would work.   The organ was moved in five lorries (sometimes more) and due to the narrowness of the roads (most were single lane) Reggie was thoughtful enough that he insisted that the trucks leave at least 15 minutes apart so they would not block the roads.   Reggie played a preformance. His crew (5 to 7 men) took down the organ, loaded it, arrived at the next place and reinstalled it. Reggie was sometimes able to give a preformance every other day.   Moller did such an outstanding job building the organ and fastening the pipes to the chests that there were times when the organ did not even need tuning after being moved. There was a large nice writeup with lots of photos in the Diapason while the organ was being built, including complete specifications.   Reggie received several awards for his work as a morale booster during the war. He grew tired of the traveling and after the war became the BBC staff organist. The BBC organ had been destroyed in the war so Reggie sold them his organ. While working for the BBC Regie composed the song that the BBC picked up as their theme song, "Keep Smiling"   His wife, Bettie, and his two children Michael and Tony came to the United States with Reggie when he came over here to become the tonal director for the Standart Organ Co. in Virginia. (The company failed before it even got started) and Reggie became the leading demonstrator for the Baldwin Organ Co. in Chicago.   In the meantime the BBC sold the organ to the Dutch Broadcasting Company and after a short time it was put into storage. Someone here in the USA discovered it and bought it from the Dutch Broadcasting Co. It was in pretty bad shape. The new owner brought it here and had Moller rebuild it. Again there was an article about the rebuild in the Diapasion. I am not sure but it seems to me that the article mentioned that some of the artisans that origionally built the organ were still there.   The organ was installed in a Pizza Parlor whose name and location escapes me now. Reggie showed me some photographs of it and it was a really beautiful instlation. The new owner had Reggie play the opening performance of his organ in it's new location.   My own mind is getting old and forgetful now and I cannot remember if Reggie died before or after the Pizza Parlor sold his organ and I do not recall who found it it's new home in Pasadena.   Bettie still lives in Clearwater Flordia and we call once in awhile. Michael Foort has just retired from Allstate Insurance Headquarters in Chicago and Tony lives in Mass. with her husband and children.   There are photographs of the organ, the lorries, the workmen etc in the book Reggie wrote as well as in the Diapason articles.   Reggie at one time had three full pages of record listings in the HMV catalog. One of his recordings was a worldwide best seller.   Robert "Bob" Shumway rshumway@iamerica.net   >Subject: THE PASADENA ORGAN -the TRUE story! >From: Stanley Lowkis <nstarfil@mediaone.net> >Date: Fri, 06 Feb 1998 23:02:50 -0500 >Jason D. Comet wrote: >> Reginald Foort touring organ. It is a 5/28 >> >Moller completely refurbished. >> ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ >> I thought that it was installed in one off BBC (British Broadcasting >> Center) 's studios. Than I beleive the ctudio had a fire. DON'T HOLLAR >> AT ME, I'M ONLY TELLING YOU WHAT I HEARD... :-) >> Jason Comet >> bombarde8@juno.com   >Perhaps some other Pipe chatters will share some more history of this >most controversial instrument. >Stan Lowkis    
(back) Subject: Re: Prelude length (Was Re: Postludes, preludes, and showing off) From: Beau Surratt <beaupiano@earthlink.net> Date: Sat, 07 Feb 1998 19:35:46 -0600   The prelude is also after the announcements at my church. It is a small church, so the prelude has to be very short. Does anyone have any suggestions for music that would suit this purpose?               At 06:45 PM 2/7/98 +0000, you wrote: >At 17:24 02/07/98 -0500, you wrote: > >>Any comments about the length of time available in various churches for >>preludes? > >The organist is also responsible for accompanying the choirs at our church. > He meets with the choir (and their director) about a half hour before the >service starts. He usually leaves us about 8 before the hour to get >started on his prelude... presumably, he takes about 5 minutes for it. (We >have a historical bell that the organist is responsible for tolling [by >throwing a switch] for about a minute or minute and a half before the >prelude as well.) > >I've been in churches where the announcements precede the Prelude... didn't >like it too much, though.... > >Have also been in worship services where the minister is in the chancel the >same time as the organist. When the organist is ready, the minister says a >few quieting words to the congregation. Doesn't help, though, when he >leaves again to return just as the prelude is ending.... > >Support from the pulpit is everything. > > --Shirley > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >  
(back) Subject: Re: Play REUBKE on a SCHLICKER? (was Re: Pregnant Pauses      & Fletcher Festival Toccata) From: Ken <mewzishn@spec.net> Date: Sat, 07 Feb 1998 20:37:58 +0000   bruce cornely wrote:   > you're only going to be there for an hour or so, you certainly can't > be > expected to cover all of the literature!!   Unless you're Tony Newman, and then you don't need the full hour at all.   But why do you have to do the Widor V for those folks on their teensy little chamber organ? There is SO much music available that would sound wonderful on that instrument, why force 'em to listen to something that's going to sound comical at best?   Ken Sybesma        
(back) Subject: Re: Postludes, preludes, and showing off From: Beau Surratt <beaupiano@earthlink.net> Date: Sat, 07 Feb 1998 19:38:57 -0600   1.5 or 2 minutes!!!!!!         At 05:24 PM 2/7/98 -0500, you wrote: >Our particular church organist is not given more than 3 or 4 minutes for >his prelude. He does improvisation for a "processional" when the pastors, >lay leaders, and if present, choir enter. Then after the "morning news", >he plays a very short prelude to introduce the worship service as such. > >Any comments about the length of time available in various churches for >preludes? > > > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >  
(back) Subject: Re: PipeChat Digest #234 - 02/05/98 From: Kevin Cartwright <kevin1@alaweb.com> Date: Sat, 07 Feb 1998 19:38:13 -0600   Jason D. Comet wrote: > > >Reginaly Foort is still alive and will be making a surprise appearance > >before > >Kenneth Starr investigative group to testify that he saw the president > >having > >sexual relations with Helen Crawford, who surprisingly, is also still > >alive. > ********************************** > G E T R E A L ! ! ! ! ! ! > > And, we should'nt have that kind of language on the list. This isn't > Health Class!!! :-| > (Kevin, you should know what I'm talking about :-) ) > > Jason Comet > bombarde8@juno.com   Which Kevin??  
(back) Subject: Re: PipeChat Digest #234 - 02/05/98 From: Kevin Cartwright <kevin1@alaweb.com> Date: Sat, 07 Feb 1998 19:40:16 -0600   Jason D. Comet wrote: > > >Poor Reginald! The military gets to testy when one signals ships at > >sea with a big Bourdon, or makes bomb explosion noises on the > >Ophicleide! No sense of humor.... tsk! > ***************************** > Or make train noises on the paramont organ with a bunch of R/R > conducters around.   To those of us whose dreams are of our own passenger trains with pipe organs inside (like myself), that was funny.   Kevin C...who has a train room in the house too.   kevin1@alaweb.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Cadet Chapel Concerts - West Point, NY (Cross Posted) From: Kevin Cartwright <kevin1@alaweb.com> Date: Sat, 07 Feb 1998 19:41:15 -0600   Jason D. Comet wrote: > > > *326 ranks, over 20,000 pipes.. > ******************************* > I wish I had that! :-)   Don't we all...except those lucky few that do.  
(back) Subject: Re: TO on the radio From: Kevin Cartwright <kevin1@alaweb.com> Date: Sat, 07 Feb 1998 19:57:20 -0600   Gregory F. Klingler wrote: > > Hi, > > Anyone out there know if the "Gee Dad, It's a WurliTzer" with Mr. Ralston is on > a New York City radio station, and, if so, what day, time and station? > > Thanks, > > Greg > > Dan Wilkinson wrote: > > > Hey there List.... > > > > On Sunday nights....at 7:00, Bob Ralston comes on and gives us an hour of > > Theatre Pipe Organ music on "Gee Dad, It's a WurliTzer." > > > Dan   Alabama too!   Kevin C. kevin1@alaweb.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Ideal From: Kevin Cartwright <kevin1@alaweb.com> Date: Sat, 07 Feb 1998 20:05:16 -0600   Alastair Disley wrote: > > > HEARD ON "THE OTHER" LIST: > >"altogether too much hymn-singing in church>" > > > >"WELL, EXCUSE US for taking the time to worship God>" > > > > Could the truth be in the middle? Maybe too many LONG hymns are sung. >Perhaps, > > in keeping with our speeded-up age, we could do fewer verses of more hymns. It > > would seem less tedious, and yet the congregation would get to keep/enhance > > their song. > > Can't see this going down with the Czech Brethren very well. They don't > consider a hymn "good" unless it has at least 20 verses. All at least > four of our lines long. Really good hymns go over 100 verses. For > time's sake, they sometimes only sing a selection of 30 or so verses > from the middle of these - when you don't understand a word of Czech it > is a very interesting experience! (I think I spent most of the time > trying to work out whether the pipes on the front of the organ were > dummies - they were, but they worked when I took one down and tried it! > ;-) ) > > Al > > -- > ======================== http://al.home.ml.org/   I like your page.   Kevin C. kevin1@alaweb.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Postludes, preludes, and showing off From: Kevin Cartwright <kevin1@alaweb.com> Date: Sat, 07 Feb 1998 20:10:51 -0600   James Burkholder wrote: > > Our particular church organist is not given more than 3 or 4 minutes for > his prelude. He does improvisation for a "processional" when the pastors, > lay leaders, and if present, choir enter. Then after the "morning news", > he plays a very short prelude to introduce the worship service as such. > > Any comments about the length of time available in various churches for > preludes?   In my church, the candles are lit before the actual service or prelude starts. Then, the oversized choir packs as tightly as they can get in the undersized enclosed section of the breezeway between the educational building and the sanctuary. The organist then plays any prelude he/she wants while the choir, followed by the music director and the pastor, tails behind. This way, the whole service staff (pastor, choirs, directors...) is in in one clump, and if there is a problem, we don't have to "fish" one person after another from the sanctuary, like a church I USED to go to. That missing sound woman story was an example of when this system is useful.   Just a thought...   Kevin Cartwright Greenville, Alabama kevin1@alaweb.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Prelude length (Was Re: Postludes, preludes, and showing off) From: Kevin Cartwright <kevin1@alaweb.com> Date: Sat, 07 Feb 1998 20:41:03 -0600   Shirley wrote: > > At 17:24 02/07/98 -0500, you wrote: > > >Any comments about the length of time available in various churches for > >preludes? > > The organist is also responsible for accompanying the choirs at our church. > He meets with the choir (and their director) about a half hour before the > service starts. He usually leaves us about 8 before the hour to get > started on his prelude... presumably, he takes about 5 minutes for it. (We > have a historical bell that the organist is responsible for tolling [by > throwing a switch] for about a minute or minute and a half before the > prelude as well.) > > I've been in churches where the announcements precede the Prelude... didn't > like it too much, though.... > > Have also been in worship services where the minister is in the chancel the > same time as the organist. When the organist is ready, the minister says a > few quieting words to the congregation. Doesn't help, though, when he > leaves again to return just as the prelude is ending.... > > Support from the pulpit is everything. > > --Shirley   Our historical has to be manually tolled. That used to be my job. The organist then can come in 2 to 2 1/2 minutes later than one that has to ring the bell. The more time with the choir, the better. (But sometimes TOO MUCH can make you go CRAZY!!)   Kevin C. kevin1@alaweb.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Prelude length (Was Re: Postludes, preludes, and showing off) From: Kevin Cartwright <kevin1@alaweb.com> Date: Sat, 07 Feb 1998 21:03:50 -0600   Beau Surratt wrote: > > The prelude is also after the announcements at my church. It is a small > church, so the prelude has to be very short. Does anyone have any > suggestions for music that would suit this purpose?   The hymn "Morning Has Broken" with music by Carlton Young (1988) and words by Eleanor Farjeon (1931) makes a wonderful prelude. I usually use: Pedal-SubBass 16', Erzahler 16', Spitz Prinzipal 8', Gemshorn 8', Choral Bass 4', and then add Rohr Floete for the last "verse." Swell-Giegen Prinzipal 8', Viole 8', Viole Celeste 8', and Octave 4', Block Floete 2', Rohr Bourdon 8' to build up to the last verse. Remember, NO REEDS, NO TREMELO!! I tried them, and with my version, they just ruined it. There is also a book of "Easy Big Sounds for Organ" that has several short, but wonderful preludes and postludes. It's at church now, but I'll look at it Sunday and get a publisher and songlist.   Just some ideas...   Kevin C. kevin1@alaweb.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Prelude length (Was Re: Postludes, preludes, and showing off) From: CDKrug@aol.com Date: Sat, 7 Feb 1998 22:36:10 EST   In a message dated 98-02-07 21:47:48 EST, you write:   << Our historical has to be manually tolled. That used to be my job. The organist then can come in 2 to 2 1/2 minutes later than one that has to ring the bell. The more time with the choir, the better. (But sometimes TOO MUCH can make you go CRAZY!!) >>   I have 5~10 minutes, then the historic bell is tolled by the usher--was the same elderly couple every week for my first two years.  
(back) Subject: Re: Reginald Foort - Touring organ From: Stanley Lowkis <nstarfil@mediaone.net> Date: Sat, 07 Feb 1998 22:38:18 -0500   Robert Shumway wrote: > > I must have missed something - regretfully. Stan could I ask why > this organ is considered controversial? I really would like to > know. I thought that everything that could be written about it > has been written.   Bob and friends, Thank you, Bob for relating the story of the Reginald Foort organ. I was joking around in my last post weaving some facts about the Moller into my 'tale'. Organ Power Pizza in San Diego was where the organ was first installed upon its arrival in the U.S. Reggie made a recording there in 1977 for Doric Records on DO 1506 (Quad). There is no controversy surrounding this acclaimed organ which has given so much pleasure to generations of listeners. All of us who have enjoyed listening to this unique instrument owe a debt of gratitude to the imagination of Foort. Thank you, Reggie.   Stan Lowkis  
(back) Subject: Re: ot: the ghost and mr. chicken organ. From: "Sean Haley" <newgershwin@hotmail.com> Date: Sat, 07 Feb 1998 20:02:57 PST   After watching the movie a "million" times I thought I would respond to a few misconceptions. Actually, in the movie the organ heard on the sound track was a theatre organ, probably a R. Morton. As for the instrument shown on film, it could not have been a tracker or mechanical instrument (I have yet to see a mechanical organ with stop tabs). Also the pipes were no where near the console or the "tuning keyboard,"(they were down at the base of the spiral stairs from the tower) which would not have facilitated the design of a mechanical instrument. But I will agree that the idea of a tuning keyboard in any pipe organ has great merit.   I thought I would put in my 2 cents worth, Sorry.   Sean Haley       . The instrument, therefore, had to >have been tracker action (of course, many such concerns are ignored in >filmmaking). But in real life, was there ever such a thing as a tuning >keyboard? Dang useful they'd be! > And I'm sure the score was composed for the film, though I don't have >that documented. It's very effective. > >Regards, > >Tom Jones >Organist/Choir Director >Mebane Presbyterian Church, Mebane, N.C.     ______________________________________________________ Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com  
(back) Subject: Piano/Organ Duets (Was Re: 4-Hand Pieces) From: patmai@juno.com (Patricia R. Maimone) Date: Sat, 7 Feb 1998 23:30:28 -0500   Hello, Pipechatters eager to play duets..   Sat, 7 Feb 98 Dan Emery <dptech@networx.on.ca> wrote: >My wife and I have a book for [4 hands and 2 feet ] of arrangements for piano and organ. Are there many [ duet ] books out there? > I would be interested in any titles.   One that contains "Easter Chimes," with a setting of the famous Easter hymn "Christ the Lord Is Risen Today" from Lyra Davidica is included in a book of (Easy) Piano -Organ Duets pub. by Lorenz.. a long time ago.. My copies are with the person who played piano from that score last year. (The cover is orange.) My sisters and I played duets from it in the 1950's and 60's.. The piano plays chords or octaves in D Major while the organ has a simpler introduction plus the tune, after quite a while. There is also a soft middle section in B Flat major, where the organ has a one-note melody. There is a Piano-Organ Duets green-covered book also published by Lorenz, which has an arrangement of Handel's "Hallelujah Chorus."   Bach's "Jesu, Joy of Man's Desiring" (originally from Cantata 147) included in one of these two volumes, has been transposed from G to the key of F. The chorale melody is played by the pianist, while the organist has the prelude, interlude and postlude triplets.   Happy practicing!   Pat M.   _____________________________________________________________________ You don't need to buy Internet access to use free Internet e-mail. Get completely free e-mail from Juno at http://www.juno.com Or call Juno at (800) 654-JUNO [654-5866]    
(back) Subject: Searching for new organ/handbell/choral literature From: "gregory@mke.earthreach.com" <gregory@mke.earthreach.com> Date: Sat, 7 Feb 98 22:41:30 -0600   Greetings:   Each year I attend the FABM (Fellowship Of American Baptist Musicians) Conference at the Green Lake Center, Green Lake, Wisconsin.   The conference leadership consists of adult choir clinician, youth choir clinician, handbell clinician, childrens choir clinician, organ clinician, several sorkshop leaders offering classes in everyting from children's musicials to orchestra, baroque instrument ensembles, brass, woodwind ensembles, folk instrument ensembles, etc.   Organ, instrumental, vocal and handbell music is on site, sponsered by Schmitt Music Company, from Minneapolis, Minn. Glen Warner from Schmitt is one of the most knowledgable individuals regarding current choral music.   The conference is held at the American Baptist Green Lake Center which also has one of the finest 36 hole golf courses in the midwest!   The conference is held the third week of July each year.   If you would like additional information, please email me with your snail address which I will forward to the FABM secretary.   Sincerely,   Tom Gregory Waukesha, WI   p.s. It was at the Green Lake Conference, many, many years ago that I first met Shirley. She took part in an adult evening talent show and demonstrated her fantastic abilities as a theater organist. I even remember (and have a copy) of the selection she played!