PipeChat Digest #247 - Wednesday, February 11, 1998
 
Phantom of the Opera and Concert Series (Update) <cross-posted>
  by Clifford N. Bohnson <cbohnson@mosquito.com>
Howard Seat: Reader Question
  by Jerrell Kautz <jkautz@ebicom.net>
Black Hawk Stadium & Organ Questions: Reader Questions
  by Jerrell Kautz <jkautz@ebicom.net>
Ripieno
  by Judy A. Ollikkala <71431.2534@compuserve.com>
Re: Black Hawk Stadium & Organ Questions: Reader Questions
  by Jon C. Habermaas <opus1100@ameritech.net>
Re: Ripieno
  by John L. Speller <jlspeller@stlnet.com>
Re: Ripieno
  by Gordon Lucas & Larry McGuire <stops@globalnet.co.uk>
Re: Music Schools in Pennsylvania
  by Shirley <pnst@itw.com>
Re: Allen analogs
  by <JerryM8319@aol.com>
Re: Pregnant Pauses
  by Barry and Claire Bodie <bbodie@InfoAve.Net>
Re: Music Schools in Pennsylvania
  by <FireAlarmz@aol.com>
Re: Music Schools in Pennsylvania
  by Shirley <pnst@itw.com>
Re: When do you want to start work?
  by Kevin Cartwright <kevin1@alaweb.com>
Multiplex Circuit Needed
  by <PipeLuvr@aol.com>
I need a Trumpet [cross posted]
  by <ComposerTX@aol.com>
 


(back) Subject: Phantom of the Opera and Concert Series (Update) <cross-posted> From: "Clifford N. Bohnson" <cbohnson@mosquito.com> Date: Tue, 10 Feb 1998 07:56:46 -0500   Well folks - we did it. Ralph Ringstad, Theatre Organist, provided the accompaniment to the 1925 "Phantom of the Opera" at ST. Peter's Episcopal Church in Medford, NJ on Sunday evening, playing the nearly-completed Davidson four-manual, forty-eight stop pipe organ. An audience of ninety gave Ralph a standing ovation at the end. A few people did have complaints -- we did not make popcorn available! Everyone concerned decided that we should do it again, so we probably will have another silent film on next year's series. In the meanwhile, our next concert will feature John Drymon and Steve Jankowski doing music "From Bach To Brubeck" for organ/piano and trumpet. John is organist/choir director at St. Joseph's RC Church in Toms River, and is also an arranger and keyboardist for such notables as Bruce Springsteen! His pairing with trumpeter Steve makes for a most engaging evening of music from the classics to contemporary jazz. This will be coming up in April - firm date to be posted later. And the culmination of the series will be the dedication of the organ on May 31st. We are planning on Stephen Tharp to do the dedicatory concert. Stephen, formerly of St. Patrick's Cathedral in NYC, is now Associate Organist at St. Bartholomew's in NYC, and a fabulous touring recitalist, playing such venues as St. Paul's Cathedral, London; the Chapel of King's College, Cambridge; Notre Dame Cathedral, Paris, etc. His two most recent CD's feature the organs at Girard College, Philadelphia; and St. Mary-the-Virgin, NYC. Hope to see some of you there! -- CLIFFORD N. BOHNSON, Director of Music Ministry St. Peter's Episcopal Church, Medford NJ St. John's RC Community, Lakehurst, NJ Sub-Dean, Ocean County Chapter, AGO http://www.mosquito.com/~unicorn/PAGE1.HTML    
(back) Subject: Howard Seat: Reader Question From: jkautz@ebicom.net (Jerrell Kautz) Date: Tue, 10 Feb 98 08:34:00 -0600   As keeper of the Theatreorgan Home Page I get questions all the time from readers who happen along. Here is one, perhaps someone can answer. Please Email directly back to the poster and, if interesting enough, to the list as well.   ============= >Return-Path: <virsi@hotmail.com> >Delivery-Date: Mon, 09 Feb 98 15:46:04 GMT >X-Originating-IP: [195.204.199.34] >From: "JOSSE BOSSE" <virsi@hotmail.com> >To: Jkautz@theatreorgans.com >Subject: Howard seat >Date: Mon, 09 Feb 1998 07:47:51 PST > >Hello. I am very interested in the so-called Howard seat used by theatre >organist in the 20`s and 30` s in the US an GB. Organ builder Bruce V. >Schantz and Hellmuth Wolff and Peterson Electro-Musical >Products mentioned that my own organist chair prototypes >(from 1979 in Bergen) based on a standard office chairs were similar to >the Howard seat used. Since I didn`t know about any other organist >using swivel seat before me, I have searched for information about its >inventor and possible patent in a book called "The Cinema >Organ" by Reginald Foort. Unfortunately, the only information was that >Michael Cheshire (a pseudonym for RF) turned around on the Howard seat. >Nowadays there is a manufacturer of a combined rigid, bench with a >simple swivel seat that can be hided under the traditional hard wide >wooden bench seat. HW suggested that I could >try to integrate the double seat into the office chair. Since I have >never got a chance to try it, I still remain sceptical if it will >function better thant one seat. If this Howard seat was such a brilliant >design, >allowing the organist to reach the sides of the pedalboard, why have not >more organists accepted it ? Since I am retired with a small pension, >because of neck and back pain, I hope that you can find some organ >builder/office chair manufacturer who could support further development >of prototypes, and perhaps small-scale manufacturing. I have found that >a seat which could be pushed more backward than on a usual office >chair could give more space to my >lower legs, which I keep more backward than when I only played on >the straight hard wooden bench. It is difficult to find a chair which >both has a tall back supporting even the shoulders, while having a >shorter seat. One has to compose one`s own organistchair. >    
(back) Subject: Black Hawk Stadium & Organ Questions: Reader Questions From: jkautz@ebicom.net (Jerrell Kautz) Date: Tue, 10 Feb 98 08:37:43 -0600   As keeper of the Theatreorgan Home Page I get questions all the time from readers who happen along. Here is one, perhaps someone can spend time answeromg. Please Email directly back to the poster and, if interesting enough, share with the list as well.   =============>Return-Path: <danthony@mnsi.net> >Delivery-Date: Tue, 27 Jan 98 15:40:00 GMT >X-Sender: danthony@mnsi.net >Date: Tue, 27 Jan 1998 10:33:07 -0500 >To: jkautz@theatreorgans.com >From: dennis anthony <danthony@mnsi.net> >Subject: music   > >i have visited your site and find it very interesting. > >i remember the organ that was at the old chicago black hawks stadium and >the shivers that you would get when it was being played before and after >games, especially the national anthem. > >what type of organ was it??? > >i understand that it was not taken to the new arena. >what happened to it and do you know the name of the man that used to play it. > >do you have any web sites to go to that i can listen to organ cd music on >audio net. > >i was really impressed with your short clip. >are your cd readily available on the market. > >i live in windsor, ontario, canada and am retired. >i am a 65 year old rookie on the internet, that listened to dizieland jazz >for most of my adult life. >by visiting different sites i can listen to different music such as pipe >organ, brass bands etc. > >is there a difference betweeen "pipe organ", "theatre organ"??? > >thank you for any help, comments or advise > >dennis anthony >danthony@mnsi.net > >    
(back) Subject: Ripieno From: "Judy A. Ollikkala" <71431.2534@compuserve.com> Date: Tue, 10 Feb 1998 10:05:29 -0500   Can someone explain what a Ripieno organ stop is?  
(back) Subject: Re: Black Hawk Stadium & Organ Questions: Reader Questions From: "Jon C. Habermaas" <opus1100@ameritech.net> Date: Tue, 10 Feb 1998 10:09:55 -0600   Jerrell Kautz wrote: > > As keeper of the Theatreorgan Home Page I get questions all the time from > readers who happen along. Here is one, > > > > >i have visited your site and find it very interesting. > > > >i remember the organ that was at the old chicago black hawks stadium and > >the shivers that you would get when it was being played before and after > >games, especially the national anthem. > > > >what type of organ was it??? > > > >i understand that it was not taken to the new arena. > >what happened to it and do you know the name of the man that used to play it. > >   > >is there a difference betweeen "pipe organ", "theatre organ"??? > > > >thank you for any help, comments or advise > > > >dennis anthony > >danthony@mnsi.net > > The Black Hawk Stadium that Dennis is asking about is the old Chicago Stadium which had a 6/62 Barton theatre pipe organ. Al Melgard was the stadium organist from the opening of the stadium and as the story goes was given a lifetime job as the organist after he broke up a riot at a boxing match shortly after the stadium opened, by putting on all the stops and playing the "Stars Spangled Banners". This brought all the rioters to attention and they stopped fighting to honor the national anthem. (can you imagine that happening in 1998) After Al died there were several organists after him, but it was never the same. The organ was not moved to the new United Center although plans were included initially to provide space for it in the new arena. Although I've never heard it...I understand that the big Allen in the new arena is not very pleasing. What politics in the arena construction and with the people making decisions on the Barton are not too clear as to way it was not moved. My own theory is that they were afraid it would rattle the windows of the luxury sky boxes. There is an interesting tale as to why Barton was given the contract to build the stadium organ. I cannot not verify the truth in the story but include it for its' own merit. Paddy Harmon who was the promoter that built the stadium had a dance hall (or should I say ballroom) on the west side of Chicago. For some reason that ballroom was built under the tracks of the Metropolitan Elevated line. Whenever a train rumbled over the dancers could not hear the orchestra. Barton told Paddy that an organ would solve his problem and a Barton organ with two identical chambers (one on each end of the ballroom) was installed. A spotter was stationed to watch for trains and whenever a train was sighted the spotter signaled the organist, who them started playing along with the orchestra. It worked like and charm an Paddy was happy. Don't know whether it was true, but Barton did get stadium contract. After the stadium closed a group of organ fans bought the Barton to preserve and try to find a new venue. The head of the group was Bobby Roppolo, who had a dance club in Lyons, Il, which had a 3/12 Barton organ and a jazzy Hammond that Bobby played for dance nights. Bobby decided to move to Arizona and moved both organs to storage in Phoenix. Sadly as most of you may have heard, both organ were destroyed by a fire along with a WurliTzer organ. Some of the Stadium organ survived as it had not been moved to the warehouse. The six manual console and what is left of the organ was sold to Phil Maloof, Las Vegas. It will be installed in his music room along with the 3/28 Barton from the Granada, Kansas City. Plans are to play a 40 rank organ from either of both consoles. A theatre organ was a type of pipe organ. The classical organs or concert type instruments that are used in churches and concert halls are much different, and are voiced to play classical music. The theatre organ was intended to accompany silent movies and was voiced with pipe work meant to convey the moods in the picture..sobbing Tibias.. brassy reeds, thick strings etc, not to mention the sounds effects.. auto horns, train whistles, fire gongs and so on. They also had lots percussions, xylophones, glockenspiels, marimba harps, drum, cymbals, ....couldn't have a good prat fall without the thud of the drum and crash of the cymbal. Of course now there are electronic representations of both types of organs. Hope this helped answer some of your questions.   Sincerely,   Jon C. Habermaas  
(back) Subject: Re: Ripieno From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com> Date: Tue, 10 Feb 1998 13:23:23 -0600 (CST)   At 10:05 AM 2/10/98 -0500, Judy wrote: >Can someone explain what a Ripieno organ stop is?   Simply put, Ripieno is just the Italian for a Mixture stop. On some twentieth-century American organs, however, it is a particular kind of "progressive" mixture, as in the case of the Ripieno mixtures there used to be on the Kilgen at St. Patrick's Cathedral, New York in the days when Pietro Yon was the organist.   John.    
(back) Subject: Re: Ripieno From: Gordon Lucas & Larry McGuire <stops@globalnet.co.uk> Date: Tue, 10 Feb 1998 19:28:32 GMT   At 10:05 AM 2/10/98 -0500, Judy A. Ollikkala wrote: >Can someone explain what a Ripieno organ stop is? > A Ripieno is a Mixture.   W L Sumner - The Organ published 1952 states 'Ripieno (Otalian: literally filling up). A mixture.'     John Hiles - Dictionary of Musical Terms, Phrases, and Abbreviations published by F Pitman Hart & Co Ltd states -   'Ripieni / Ripieno - The tutti or full parts which fill up and aument the effects of the full chorus of voices and instruments. In a large orxhestra, all the violins, violas abd basses, are sometimes called the ripieni.   Ripienist - A player of the ripieno or tutti parts in an orchestra.   Ripieno di cinque / Ripieur di cinque - A mixture stop of 5 ranks in Italian organs.   Ripieno di due - A mixture stop of 2 ranks.   Ripieno di quattro - A mixture stop of 4 ranks.   Ripieno di tre - A Mixture stop of 3 ranks.     Personal observation - In many organs of the 20th century, where a 'Ripieno' has been included in the specification, they have usually been of 4 ranks, and at the CC have been of the 'harmonics' type, something along the lines of: '17 19 b21 22', breaking back every 18 notes or so, to form in the top notes (the top half octave at least) - '8 10 12 15'.   Hope this helps.        
(back) Subject: Re: Music Schools in Pennsylvania From: Shirley <pnst@itw.com> Date: Tue, 10 Feb 1998 14:23:19   At 16:17 02/09/98 -0500, you wrote: >Hi List, > > Does anyone know of any good music schools in Pennsylvania? I heard >Susquehenna is a nice school, but that is all I have heard. I am >looking into a composition major and minor in organ. > >Thanx, >Jill     I would be remiss if I didn't tell you about the Esther Boyer College of Music at Temple University, Philadelphia. Composition department is excellent, organ department could use some work. HOWEVER: In Philadelphia, you are close to some of the best organs and organists in the country, not to mention the orchestral cultural scene of a big city. The school does not have a practice instrument in it, but this may be a blessing in disguise.... you can practice on something larger, and probably at the church where the professor plays. (Not sure who is there now.... used to be Dennis Elwell, I believe, of Overbrook Pres.) An education from Temple will make you a complete musician... the theory, aural theory, and music history courses are tough, depending on which professor you draw.   Depending on the direction you want to go, Westminster Choir College (ok, it's in Princeton, NJ) offers a rigorous church-music program.   Curtis Institute in Philly might also be worthwhile to look into, though they select only the top people for their performance programs.... don't know if they have anything for comp or organ perf or not.   Also, Penn State (main campus) I've heard is a good music school.... as well as Indiana U. of PA (IUP).   Hope that helps. :)   --Shirley EBCM, Temple U. Class of January, 1993 Summa Cum Laude BMus in Music Education w/ piano concentration  
(back) Subject: Re: Allen analogs From: JerryM8319@aol.com Date: Tue, 10 Feb 1998 16:55:21 EST   Could anyone tell me the status and condition of the organ at Tenth Presbyterian in Philadelphia? What is their music program like? Thanks  
(back) Subject: Re: Pregnant Pauses From: Barry and Claire Bodie <bbodie@InfoAve.Net> Date: Tue, 10 Feb 1998 20:13:13 -0500   Dr Darryl Miller wrote: > > Hi, Y'all! > > This is one of my favorite things to do when I'm feeling cranky and > frisky and tired of chatting. > > ---Alex Rowley "Benedictus" has a big build up and then a pregnant > pause. > ---Jongen "Chorale" very slowly builds to blastissimo -- then I usually > go to a very quiet piece like the Langlais "Kyrie" from the Frescobaldi > suite. > ---John La Montain's "Even Song" is a good piece for a big build up and > then a decrescendo. > > I'll think of more and post 'em when the ol' brain is working better! > > Yours, > > Darryl by the Sea > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org Meditation on "Brother James' Air" by Harold Darke comes to mind.  
(back) Subject: Re: Music Schools in Pennsylvania From: FireAlarmz@aol.com Date: Tue, 10 Feb 1998 20:19:47 EST   But Shirley- didn't Temple just recently drop its church organ program? (I was offered their small Allen at a VERY low price)     Bill Miller  
(back) Subject: Re: Music Schools in Pennsylvania From: Shirley <pnst@itw.com> Date: Tue, 10 Feb 1998 21:43:45   At 20:19 02/10/98 EST, you wrote: >But Shirley- didn't Temple just recently drop its church organ program? (I was >offered their small Allen at a VERY low price) > > >Bill Miller     Bill and all--   A dig into the website turned up "John Binsfeld, Lecturer in Organ; Graduate of The Curtis Institute of Music.". Also, the course offerings refer to "organ major".... Maybe they're phasing it out by the end of the spring semester.... hmm....   And for Jillian, I still say she should look at the composition department, though.   Website for the music school at Temple U.: http://www.temple.edu/music/   Go Owls. :)   --Shirley    
(back) Subject: Re: When do you want to start work? From: Kevin Cartwright <kevin1@alaweb.com> Date: Tue, 10 Feb 1998 21:21:42 -0600   This was origionally a private response, but I thought it would be interesting for everybody:   Robert E. Wilhelm, Jr. wrote: > > Kevin, > > >To those of us whose dreams are of our own passenger trains with pipe > >organs inside (like myself), that was funny. > > I agree but it is not practicle! Vibration of the train on the tracks and > the changing climate would make tuning an absolute %$#@^! Course the > all-metal construction inside the car would reverb like the preverbial fart > in a bathroom.   Well actually, you sound like you don't know very much about modern passenger trains (here I go again). They ride so smoothly that tuning would not actually be a (fill in curse word here). You'd only have to tune it after every trip. Of course, you weren't thinking about playing it when the train was moving were you?? That's a big no no. If you really want to screw it up, let it vibrate and rock-and-roll at the same time. Of course, I was thinking about something that would only be used when the train was still for a longer period of time. Why put a tracker in a sailing yacht?? But, there is a company that's doing it.   Farting in bathroom, something I'm not familiar with... Those nice modern passenger cars do not resonate at all. There designed that way. If you ride in a box car, and go over a switch, there will be a big boom, followed by a resonation. The passenger cars, however, just release a minor thud, and that's that. With the new design (implemented since the 1960's), the car would not "reverb like the preverbial fart in a bathroom."   Sorry to burst your bubble. But, I'd probably have a good time finding a tech that would service that particular organ too.   Kevin C. kevin1@alaweb.com   Bob, hope you don't mind me posting a private. List, sorry about that long model railroad inventory list. I think I meant to send it privately, but somehow didn't.  
(back) Subject: Multiplex Circuit Needed From: PipeLuvr@aol.com Date: Tue, 10 Feb 1998 23:53:17 EST   Hi List:   I am exploring the possibility of remoting the electronics in my Rodgers Custom 340 to a different area which will allow enlargement and expansion. I would like to use some type of multiplex circuitry which would allow a high at the console end ultimately manifest itself as +12 v at the remoted electronics end. My preference would be to mux the circuitry to limit the size of the interconnecting cable. The requirements would be for approximately 500 inputs (keys, stops, pedals) going to 500 outputs (related keyers/tone filters) in a 1 to 1 relationship.   Is anyone aware of an existing design which would accomplish this, or am I on my own! Any help appreciated!   Best wishes, Bob Acker  
(back) Subject: I need a Trumpet [cross posted] From: ComposerTX@aol.com Date: Wed, 11 Feb 1998 00:31:28 EST   I'm looking for these ranks on 5 to 6 inches of wind:   16' soft Trumpet, Trompette, Cornopean, 73-85 notes 16' pedal Bourdon, Subbass, 44 notes [or at least pipes 25 through 44] 1' Mixture III ranks 4' Koppelflote, Spillflote   Thanks for your time and response.   Danny Ray ComposerTX@AOL.com