PipeChat Digest #248 - Wednesday, February 11, 1998
 
Re: Adjustable bench
  by Douglas A. Campbell <dougcampbell@juno.com>
Re: Howard Seat
  by Robert P. Bass <rpbass@earthlink.net>
Re: When do you want to start work?
  by John L. Speller <jlspeller@stlnet.com>
Hello, and a recital
  by Jonathan B. Hall <jonahall@indiana.edu>
Re: Howard Seat
  by robert.cowley <robert.cowley@MCI2000.com>
Church organist wanted (FWD)X-POST
  by Paul Opel <popel@sover.net>
Re: Multiplex Circuit Needed
  by Ross C Robinson <dt676@freenet.carleton.ca>
Re: When do you want to start work?
  by Robert E. Wilhelm, Jr. <wilhelre@sterlingdi.com>
Re: Howard Tractor Seat in Chicago
  by <TonyIn219@aol.com>
Chicago Blackhawks organ, unecessarily destroyed in '97.
  by <TonyIn219@aol.com>
Re: Chicago Blackhawks organ, unecessarily destroyed in '97.
  by Stanley E Yoder <syoder+@andrew.cmu.edu>
Re: Chicago Blackhawks organ, unecessarily destroyed in '97.
  by Stanley Lowkis <nstarfil@mediaone.net>
Re: Howard Tractor Seat in Chicago
  by Steven Margison <mgcfngrs@ameritech.net>
Re: Howard Tractor Seat in Chicago
  by Richard Wolf <floww@webtv.net>
Re: Chicago Blackhawks organ, unecessarily destroyed in '97.
  by Jon C. Habermaas <opus1100@ameritech.net>
Re: Howard Tractor Seat in Chicago
  by Shirley <pnst@itw.com>
Re: Music Schools in Pennsylvania
  by Jillian K. Schultheis <organgeek@geocities.com>
test
  by Jonathan M Orwig <giwro@juno.com>
BlackHawk Organ was Chicago Stadium (long).
  by Jon C. Habermaas <opus1100@ameritech.net>
Concert Announcement
  by <SchultzRH@aol.com>
 


(back) Subject: Re: Adjustable bench From: dougcampbell@juno.com (Douglas A. Campbell) Date: Tue, 10 Feb 1998 21:42:18 EST     On Sun, 8 Feb 1998 21:31:38 -0500 bombarde8@juno.com (Jason D. Comet) writes: >Does anybody know of a place or company that turns single height organ >benches into adjustable organ benches. > >Right now, our organ bench is shared by two people. Me and our other >organist. Our other organist likes the bench right where it is, but >when I use it, my legs are too long for the bench. I tried using >boards about 1/2" thick, but the bench wobbles and tips. The legs are >seated on a carpet (Lord knows who's Idea that was!) and tips when on >blocks. > Dear Jason, Instead of using little blocks - try a nice 2 x 6 on each side !if it is still unstable put quarter round moulding around where the bench sits on the planks.   This should work (and not cost a whole lot) It will also give you about a 1-1/2" rise !     Douglas A. Campbell Skaneateles, NY   _____________________________________________________________________ You don't need to buy Internet access to use free Internet e-mail. Get completely free e-mail from Juno at http://www.juno.com Or call Juno at (800) 654-JUNO [654-5866]    
(back) Subject: Re: Howard Seat From: "Robert P. Bass" <rpbass@earthlink.net> Date: Wed, 11 Feb 1998 04:26:40 +8000   Just 'unearthed' a copy of 'Theatre Organ Bombarde', the official Journal of the American Theatre Organ Enthusiasts dated June 1967. On page 19, Keyboard Entertainment Products Manufacturing Co. advertised "an exact duplicate" of the Howard "Wonder" Seat. It was priced at $160.00. Their address is listed as 2117 40th St., Des Moines, Iowa. It would be interesting if anyone knows where they are today....   Good luck on your quest.   Bob rpbass@earthlink.net Tibia@theatreorgans.com      
(back) Subject: Re: When do you want to start work? From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com> Date: Wed, 11 Feb 1998 06:49:24 -0600 (CST)   At 09:21 PM 2/10/98 -0600, Kevin Cartwright wrote:   >Well actually, you sound like you don't know very much about modern >passenger trains (here I go again). They ride so smoothly that tuning >would not actually be a (fill in curse word here). You'd only have to >tune it after every trip. Of course, you weren't thinking about playing >it when the train was moving were you??   Back in the nineteenth century reed organs were certainly popular on trains, and people used to pass the long hours with music as they crossed the continent. There was even an Episcopal Bishop out west who had a "Cathedral on Wheels" in a railroad car with a reed organ. A number of churches used to have their own railroad cars, which could be kept in a siding and used as a parish house most of them time, and then taken out, hooked up to a train and used to go on Sunday School outings, Diocesan Conventions, and suchlike. A number of the old Kimball portable pipe organs were built for Mississippi river boats, and were specially made so that the pipes could be shaken about more than usual and stay relatively in tune. I imagine the same thing could have been done in railroad trains even a hundred years ago, though I am not aware of a case where anyone actually did.   John.    
(back) Subject: Hello, and a recital From: "Jonathan B. Hall" <jonahall@indiana.edu> Date: Wed, 11 Feb 1998 08:11:23 -0500   Hello, PIPECHAT...   I have been a member of another organ-related list for some time now; I thought I would sample this list too, and see how it goes.   From the postings I've been reading, I can see that some of the other subscribers to this forum are involved in other forums, and are already somewhat familiar to me. To one and all, hello!   I am a doctoral student in organ performance, teaching music theory and playing at a church to pay my way. I also have a growing private studio--at the moment, all piano students. As the return to full-time academic work always means a kind of retreat from one's previous existence--dare I hope to say a *rebirth*?--my involvement in the organ scene outside the halls of academia is somewhat reduced right now. I have a few recitals on the books, but have been focusing much more on coursework lately.   One upcoming recital I'm excited about is my first Organ Dedication! Next Sunday, in Indianapolis, at 4:30 PM, I shall be dedicating the rebuilt and enhanced Schantz organ at Fairview Presbyterian Church, 46th and Capitol. This active and growing congregation, located between the Governor's Mansion and Butler University just off historic North Meridian Street, made a decision a few years ago not to scrap its old instrument in favor of a digital, but to commit anew to a pipe organ.   This is a small instrument, but remarkably full and powerful; the pipework has real integrity, and while I could wish for more ranks, what I've got is tastefully done and well planned. It is certainly an organ that will please listeners, as it pleases this player. The music ministry at the church is impressive and growing.   One interesting twist, and I'm sure only the first of many times I shall encounter this, is the presence of MIDI capability along with pipes. I have been told that I am expected to showcase the MIDI component of this new instrument along with its classical pipework. I have come up with (if I say so myself) a clever solution!   The program is as follows:   Bach/Vivaldi, concerto in a minor Couperin, recit de tierce en taille Mendelssohn, Fifth Sonata   Hymn: When in our music God is glorified (Engleberg) Alain, Litanies Hampton, Everyone Dance Vierne, Impromptu, Carillon de Westminster   I have decided to use the MIDI to introduce the congregational hymn with which part II will open. I sat down and composed a little fanfare dialogue, where a fragment of "Engleberg" will be bantered back and forth between the MIDI "pipe organ" chorus and the Swell reed chorus. Since we're introducing the organ to Indianapolis, why not introduce the MIDI and Pipework formally and properly to each other...!   The MIDI may make a cameo appearance elsewhere in the program...I won't say for sure...see if anybody notices!   I'm sure many folks out there have great ideas about the integration of the new technologies into the classical music scene. Pipe-centric that I am, I still am realistic about the future, and I foresee an increased role for MIDI down the road. How can we best handle this to keep solid artistry and respect for our tradition at a premium? I haven't had time or reason--so far--to delve into the literature. Any terse, pithy thoughts?   It's very pleasant to be part of the life of a church congregation at such a happy time...   regards,   Jonathan Hall Bloomington, IN      
(back) Subject: Re: Howard Seat From: "robert.cowley" <robert.cowley@MCI2000.com> Date: Wed, 11 Feb 1998 08:14:23 -0800   Keyboard Entertainment Products is a old company NOW called Arndt Organ Supply.   Bob C.   ---------- > From: Robert P. Bass <rpbass@earthlink.net> > To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> > Cc: virsi@hotmail.com > Subject: Re: Howard Seat > Date: Tuesday, February 10, 1998 8:26 PM > > Just 'unearthed' a copy of 'Theatre Organ Bombarde', the > official Journal of the American Theatre Organ Enthusiasts dated > June 1967. On page 19, Keyboard Entertainment Products > Manufacturing Co. advertised "an exact duplicate" of the Howard > "Wonder" Seat. It was priced at $160.00. Their address is > listed as 2117 40th St., Des Moines, Iowa. It would be > interesting if anyone knows where they are today.... > > Good luck on your quest. > > Bob > rpbass@earthlink.net > Tibia@theatreorgans.com > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: Church organist wanted (FWD)X-POST From: Paul Opel <popel@sover.net> Date: Wed, 11 Feb 1998 09:55:50 -0400   >From: HOWYACALIT@aol.com >Date: Tue, 10 Feb 1998 20:46:02 EST >To: popel@sover.net >Mime-Version: 1.0 >Subject: Church organist wanted > >Dear Paul: > >I was wondering if you were aware of an organist who might be willing to play >at the Blessed Sacrament Church in East Hartford, CT. > >The person would need to play on Saturday night mass and 3 Sunday masses. > >Pay is adequate and negotiable. > >If you can't help me with this, maybe you can direct me to someone that would >be interested. > >I look forward to your reply. > >Thank You. >Mark >   http://www.sover.net/~popel      
(back) Subject: Re: Multiplex Circuit Needed From: dt676@freenet.carleton.ca (Ross C Robinson) Date: Wed, 11 Feb 1998 08:29:28 -0500 (EST)   > >Hi List: > >I am exploring the possibility of remoting the electronics in my Rodgers >Custom 340 to a different area which will allow enlargement and expansion. I >would like to use some type of multiplex circuitry which would allow a high at >the console end ultimately manifest itself as +12 v at the remoted electronics >end. My preference would be to mux the circuitry to limit the size of the >interconnecting cable. The requirements would be for approximately 500 inputs >(keys, stops, pedals) going to 500 outputs (related keyers/tone filters) in a >1 to 1 relationship. > >Is anyone aware of an existing design which would accomplish this, or am I on >my own! Any help appreciated! > >Best wishes, >Bob Acker > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > You can obtain multiplex circuits from Peterson, Z-tronics and others which will produce positive outputs for positive inputs. Email adresses are available from a long list at www.freeyellow.com/members/radentonson/organ.htm, or write me back and I will look them up for you. Seems that 500 or so circuits is a lot of system, do you really need all that?   Ross   -- Ross C Robinson, dt676@freenet.carleton.ca Lion Tamer, taming the King of Musical Beasts.  
(back) Subject: Re: When do you want to start work? From: "Robert E. Wilhelm, Jr." <wilhelre@sterlingdi.com> Date: Wed, 11 Feb 1998 09:37:48 -0500   Yesterday Kevin commented to this list on a private posting I had made to him. A couple of further comments/clarifications.....   >Well actually, you sound like you don't know very much about modern >passenger trains (here I go again).   Perhaps quite the contrary as I have an Engineer's license, and Conductor & Brakeman's license for the Wilmington & Western Railroad. I'll admit that the WWRR runs a 1908 American class steam locomotive along with its diesels and that its cars are vintage (1914 Pullman Boonton Coaches) but none the less I do tend to keep up to date on the current technology of the railroad industry. Were we to "match wits" you might be surprised as to the technological and historical background that I possess related to railroads. Perhaps you'd care to read a short book I wrote regarding the Wilmington & Western??   >>You'd only have to tune it after every trip.   If you've ever tuned a instrument you'd know that for even a small one, this might amount to a considerable amout of time if it is to be done properly.   >With the new design (implemented >since the 1960's), the car would not "reverb like the preverbial fart in >a bathroom."   I must admit that my mental state when I wrote my reply was with the WWRR's cars in mind. They are first generation all steel coaches. The construction is steel I-beams with 1/4" steel plate riveted to the beams. The floors are 6" of concrete. There is a metal ceiling. Empty weight of a coach is 83 tons! Needless to say, with the exception of the seats, everything inside the car is steel or concrete and they become very resonate when they are not filled with passengers. Track noise as the cars roll over bolted-joint rails is amplified inside the car but there is something about riding in one with the windows open in the fall and the smell of leaves, coal, and steam that the present Amtrak cars just don't seem to provide.   You are correct that the present day "beer can coaches" are much improved both in ride and interior construction. I believe a modern Amtrak coach weighs on the order of 1/3 of what a WWRR coach weighs. The aluminum shell provides a significant portion of the structural integrity and that "can" is vibration mounted and oscillation damped using state of the art isolators, insulation materials and shocks. My recent trips along the Northeast Corridor inside one of these coaches was more luxurious than perhaps a WWRR coach, but I'll tell you that my favorite rail rides have been in the UK where the efficiency and comfort levels are far superior to what Amtrak has.   >Sorry to burst your bubble.   Actually you didn't, you reminded me that I should better understand the individual(s) that I'm communicating with! It has been my experience that true collectors of railroad memorabilia tend to collect vintage classics and restore them and that they only apply state of the art hardware where absolutely necessary to make their restorations legal on today's tracks. I've often seen vintage Pullman cars with stained-glass windows and hand-finished paneled interiors, tagged to the rear of a modern train, so their railfan owners could vacation in the railroad luxury of a by-gone era. Likewise pipe organ buffs tend to collect vintage instruments or parts and pipes from vintage instruments to make up their own instruments. When I wrote to you it was with these thoughts in mind -- I was envisioning a vintage railroad car containing an old pipe organ, probably a theatre organ since those are my love. I find that I must now apologize to you and now to the list, both for our respective digressions, and that I forgot that today some people are often quick to forget our past heritage and only wish to live in the present.    
(back) Subject: Re: Howard Tractor Seat in Chicago From: TonyIn219@aol.com Date: Wed, 11 Feb 1998 10:20:35 EST   Isn't the Howard seat the kind of seat on the SanFelippo organ (largest theatre organ in the world) in Barrington? Looks kind of like a gilded John Deere tractor seat, right?   John Carington Chesterton, Indiana IDOEDITING@aol.com Home of the Invincible Lowrey H-25-3  
(back) Subject: Chicago Blackhawks organ, unecessarily destroyed in '97. From: TonyIn219@aol.com Date: Wed, 11 Feb 1998 10:33:34 EST   The organ you are referring to was a Barton 6/51.   Al Melgard was the organist there from 1930 to 1974. Frank Pellico was the organist until the wrecking ball destroyed the stadium in 1995. Frank was a very good organist, but sadly, he also thought he could sing, which ruined most of the recordings that he made on this machine.   The organ was larger than the Mormon Tab-and-Apple organ in Salt Lake City.   It had six manuals, nine rows of stops (828 total), 32 pedals, and a telephone system (because the farthest loft was a more than 20-minute walk).   The organ had 4,000 pipes and a 100-hp blower (the largest ever).   The sound equalled that of 25 brass bands of 100 pieces each, or 2,500 orchestral pieces, all at once. Pretty darn awesome.   The console and pipes were saved from the wrecking ball. Unfortunately, the guys who rescued the pipes didn't learn their lesson that you don't keep ANYTHING OF VALUE in Cook County. The storage building that housed these pipes burned to the ground a few months back, and the pipes were destroyed.   The console was stored in Indiana and I am trying to purchase it and do a MIDI conversion.   John Carington Chesterton, Indiana Tonyin219@aol.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Chicago Blackhawks organ, unecessarily destroyed in '97. From: Stanley E Yoder <syoder+@andrew.cmu.edu> Date: Wed, 11 Feb 1998 10:43:14 -0500 (EST)   Excerpts from mail: 11-Feb-98 Chicago Blackhawks organ, u.. by TonyIn219@aol.com > The organ was larger than the Mormon Tab-and-Apple organ in Salt Lake City.   By what measure? By loudness or blower HP, perhaps, but certainly not by number of ranks or pipes. Stan Yoder Pittsburgh  
(back) Subject: Re: Chicago Blackhawks organ, unecessarily destroyed in '97. From: Stanley Lowkis <nstarfil@mediaone.net> Date: Wed, 11 Feb 1998 11:22:06 -0500   TonyIn219@aol.com wrote: > >Frank was a very good organist, but sadly, he also thought he could >sing, which ruined most of the recordings that he made on this machine.     I would like to get a recording of Frank Pellico on the Chicago Stadium Barton, with or without vocals. These sound like very interesting recordings. Perhaps you can tell the list a little more about them.       >Unfortunately, the guys who rescued the pipes didn't learn their lesson >that you don't keep ANYTHING OF VALUE in Cook County. The storage >building that housed these pipes burned to the ground a few months >back, and the pipes were destroyed. > > The console was stored in Indiana and I am trying to purchase it and >do a MIDI conversion.   This is some new information. I heard that the bulk of the organ had been moved to Phoenix, AZ, placed in storage where fire in an adjacent structure ignited the resonators. The console, the way I heard it, has been purchased for a music room in Nevada where it will be a part of an installation which will include the Granada Barton.   I heard that the remainder of the organ still in the Chicago area is still intact.   Stan Lowkis  
(back) Subject: Re: Howard Tractor Seat in Chicago From: Steven Margison <mgcfngrs@ameritech.net> Date: Wed, 11 Feb 1998 10:56:41 -0600   TonyIn219@aol.com wrote: > Isn't the Howard seat the kind of seat on the SanFelippo organ?   Yes, it is. But it is only used for show. When the organ is played a bench seat is used. I have never used a Howard seat, but I've heard from those that have that the seat is very uncomfortable and can, ahem, cause pain and discomfort to parts uniquely male if you're not careful.   Like all things Sanfilippo, the bench seat used in performances spares no cost. It is motorized to adjust the height.   |===================== Steve Margison =====================| |Organs, Theatres, Ham Radio, Lots of things at my WebSite:| |==== http://www.ameritech.net/users/mgcfngrs/home.htm ====|  
(back) Subject: Re: Howard Tractor Seat in Chicago From: floww@webtv.net (Richard Wolf) Date: Wed, 11 Feb 1998 11:12:25 -0600   My only experience with a Howard seat was Memphis Tennesse while stationed at the Naval Air Station. The Orpheum theatre manager allowed me to use the organ for practice. It originally had a Howard seat when I first began to use the organ. It required quite a balancing act when playing a complicated pedal part {ie. Bach}. It had a tendency to turn you away from the console. I was lucky to get a regular bench that was stored way up in one of the pipe chambers.It wasn't easy to get it down using vertical ladders, but it was worth the acrobatics.   Dick  
(back) Subject: Re: Chicago Blackhawks organ, unecessarily destroyed in '97. From: "Jon C. Habermaas" <opus1100@ameritech.net> Date: Wed, 11 Feb 1998 11:41:29 -0600   TonyIn219@aol.com wrote: > 3Unfortunately, the > guys who rescued the pipes didn't learn their lesson that you don't keep > ANYTHING OF VALUE in Cook County. The storage building that housed these pipes > burned to the ground a few months back, and the pipes were destroyed. > What does this have to do with Cook County??? Storage building that burned was in Phoenix, Az. Console has already been sold.  
(back) Subject: Re: Howard Tractor Seat in Chicago From: Shirley <pnst@itw.com> Date: Wed, 11 Feb 1998 13:23:21   At 10:56 02/11/98 -0600, you wrote:   > I have never used a Howard seat, but I've heard >from those that have that the seat is very uncomfortable and can, ahem, >cause pain and discomfort to parts uniquely male if you're not careful.   Heeheehee....   The theatre organ (Wurlitzer?) in the Surf City Hotel in New Jersey had one of those. (Windowed chambers too, with flourescently painted xylophone hammers. And the marimba. And the glockenspiel. And anything else that were visually fun to watch. The shades were placed above the windows.) The Delaware Valley Chapter ATOS held a meeting there every year.... in September as I recall....   Anyway, I remember that Howard seat real well. The open console list was always very long, and even with 10 minutes per player, it got to the point where folks would be waiting for an hour or two before they played. The organ was located in the bar portion of the restaurant that took up the first floor of the hotel. By the time many of these organists got to the bench, the bar had taken a lot of their money, and they weren't as alert as they should have been. Yeow!   There is a nickname the men had for this seat (chuckle) that I won't list here. :) :) :)   And it was difficult to be a lady clambering onto the thing. I don't know how many times I almost fell through the middle of it onto the pedals trying to get onto it... AND off. There was usually a gentleman on hand to hold the thing closed for me to wiggle my rear end onto it (hmm.... hindsight), but never anybody to help me clamber off it. I was on my own then!   Oh, I hope these things are no longer made.... one of those concepts that looks better on paper than in practice!   WAHOO! :)   --Shirley   PS--I've never been in a tractor, so I don't know what a tractor seat is like. This Howard seat was fabric-covered and padded, but not ergonomic. And NO place to go. If the seat wasn't in the right place for your particular playing style, you couldn't shift to another portion of bench.  
(back) Subject: Re: Music Schools in Pennsylvania From: "Jillian K. Schultheis" <organgeek@geocities.com> Date: Wed, 11 Feb 1998 16:27:46 -0500   Shirley wrote: > > At 20:19 02/10/98 EST, you wrote: > >But Shirley- didn't Temple just recently drop its church organ program? (I > was > >offered their small Allen at a VERY low price) > > > > > >Bill Miller > > Bill and all-- > > A dig into the website turned up "John Binsfeld, Lecturer in Organ; > Graduate of The Curtis Institute of Music.". Also, the course offerings > refer to "organ major".... Maybe they're phasing it out by the end of the > spring semester.... hmm.... > > And for Jillian, I still say she should look at the composition department, > though. > > Website for the music school at Temple U.: http://www.temple.edu/music/ > > Go Owls. :) > > --Shirley I just recieved info on Temple about a month ago. They had nothing about organ. Saw the facad of the auditorium organ, that's it.   Jill  
(back) Subject: test From: giwro@juno.com (Jonathan M Orwig) Date: Tue, 10 Feb 1998 21:43:41 -0800   test   _____________________________________________________________________ You don't need to buy Internet access to use free Internet e-mail. Get completely free e-mail from Juno at http://www.juno.com Or call Juno at (800) 654-JUNO [654-5866]    
(back) Subject: BlackHawk Organ was Chicago Stadium (long). From: "Jon C. Habermaas" <opus1100@ameritech.net> Date: Wed, 11 Feb 1998 16:22:54 -0600   After reviewing some of the posts regarding the Stadium Barton. Some of the descriptions of the organ appear to have been very similar to the Al Melgard record jackets. I had originally thought the organ to be over 60 ranks, but it appears to be 51 ranks. Touted as the worlds largest Unit Theatre Organ..which is probably was. The huge Fox Specials were a mere 36 ranks and the Radio City Music Hall (which came later) around 59 ranks. It is not only the size that made the Chicago Stadium Barton unique. It was the kind of organ that it had to be to fill that big barn that was the Stadium. In later years the TV Sports guys would talk about the roar of the stadium. The sound of the crowd that rolled through the building. The Barton was capable of being heard over that roar. It was a big voiced, high pressure musical bully which made its' presence known. I dug through the box of what my wife refers to as useless CR&# and found the stop list for the stadium organ. It was given to me by my friend, the late Bob Montgomery, who serviced the organ at one time. Whenever the organ was being used, there had to be a service man there in order to pull any loud ciphers. Since the list is over six pages long (single spaced typed, in 3 columns) I will stick to listing the ranks of pipes. Organ was in 4 chambers below the roof of the stadium. 16' Diaphone I 8' Solo Diapason I 8' Oboe Horn I 16' Diaphone II 8' Solo Diapson II 8' Oboe Horn II 16' Stentorphone I 8' French Horn 8' Viol Celeste I 16' Stentorphone II 8' Sax'phone 8' Viol Celeste II 16' Major Flute 8' Vox Humana (3rk Chorus) 16' Tuba Mirablis 8' Clarinet (2 rks) 8' Viol Celeste III 16' Tuba Profunda 8' English Post Horn I 8' Viol Celeste VI 16' English Horn 8' English Post Horn II 8' Viol Celeste V 16' Solo String I 8' Trumpet 8' Viol Celeste VI 16' Solo String II 8' Kinura (3 rks) Xylophones I 16' Tibia Clausa I 8' Solo Tuba Xylophones II 8' Tibia Clausa II 8' Tuba Celeste (3 rks) Orchestral Bells I 8' Tibia Clausa III 8' Gamba Orchestral Bells II 8' Tibia Clausa IV 8' Gamba Celeste I Harp 8' Double Flute 8' Gamba Celeste II Castanets 8' Tibia Plena 8' Viol D' Orch I Tambourines 8' Tibia Molis 8' Viol D' Orch II Snare Drums 8' Gross Flute 8' Viol D' Orch III Bass Drum Cymbals In addition in the pedal: Crash Cymbals There was a 32'Accoustic Bass and a 32'Contra Bass (which were probably extensions of the diaphones) It is tragic after the momenumental job that was done to save and remove the organ from the stadium that it ended it a warehouse fire. They do deserve a great deal of credit for the effort that was expended to try and save this unique instrument. I visited the chambers once..and it was really way up there.   regards, Jon C. Habermaas  
(back) Subject: Concert Announcement From: SchultzRH@aol.com Date: Wed, 11 Feb 1998 17:39:43 EST   Especially for persons in the Philadelphia Area:   Two excellent organists, David Rhyne and Eric Gombert are performing in a different media, two grand pianos, this Friday, February 13, 1998.   With a Choral of 18 Excellent Singers, they will preform the   Liebeslieder Walzer of Johannes Brahms.   After the intermission, Eric and David together with string bass and percussion will perform the   Sonata for Two Pianists No. 2 by Claude Bolling.   The concert will take place at   Trinity Ev. Lutheran Church 1000 W. Main St. Lansdale, PA (Main Street is PA route 63)   No admission charge; offering taken