PipeChat Digest #255 - Tuesday, February 17, 1998
 
Re: Edwin H. Lemare and the Andantino in D flat AKA "Moonlight  & Roses"
  by John L. Speller <jlspeller@stlnet.com>
Re: Dedication Recital & comments - who built it?
  by Jonathan M Orwig <giwro@juno.com>
Re: Listening to the organ (used to be Re: The organ on the   WWW.)
  by Ron Yost <musik@tcsn.net>
Re: Listening to the organ
  by Jason D. Comet <bombarde8@juno.com>
Re: Listening to the organ (used to be Re: The organ on the  WWW.)
  by <OrganAngel@aol.com>
Re: Listening to the organ (used to be Re: The organ on the WWW.)
  by Otto Pebworth <opebwrth@gte.net>
Re: Size 14 (mens) Converse organ shoes
  by Judy A. Ollikkala <71431.2534@compuserve.com>
Re: Size 14 (mens) Converse organ shoes
  by <GRSCoLVR@aol.com>
Re: Listening to the organ (used to be Re: The organ on the WWW.)
  by <GHamil9709@aol.com>
Conversation Evening
  by Ruth S Bird <theraven@istar.ca>
Re: Dedication Recital & comments
  by Ken <mewzishn@spec.net>
Re: Size 14 (mens) Converse organ shoes
  by bruce cornely <cremona84000@webtv.net>
Re: Size 14 (mens) Converse organ shoes
  by bruce cornely <cremona84000@webtv.net>
Re: Conversation Evening
  by Bob Conway <conwayb@post.queensu.ca>
Re: Listening to the organ
  by Sean Haley <newgershwin@hotmail.com>
Re: Listening to the organ
  by Mac Hayes <mach37@ptw.com>
Re: Dedication Recital & comments
  by Jonathan M Orwig <giwro@juno.com>
Re: Size 14 (mens) Converse organ shoes
  by <PHarri5833@aol.com>
 


(back) Subject: Re: Edwin H. Lemare and the Andantino in D flat AKA "Moonlight & Roses" From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com> Date: Mon, 16 Feb 1998 15:51:26 -0600 (CST)   At 03:00 PM 2/16/98 -0500, Will Scarboro wrote: > > The Andantino in D flat was Lemare's most popular piece of >music. <SNIP> If it were not on the program the audience >would request him to play it.   There is a touching story about this piece in the second of Nelson Barden's three articles on Edwin H. Lemare in *The Organ* Nos. 250-252 (Oct. 1984-April 1985). Lemare was over from America spending the summer of 1911 in the Isle of Wight with his parents. Also visiting there was nine-year-old Iris Lemare, his daughter from his first marriage which had ended in divorce. Lemare did not have a great deal to say to his daughter, and when she asked if he would play her favorite organ piece, in a bored sort of way he went over to the piano and began playing the "Andantino in D flat." "Oh no, not THAT!" she cried, and began whistling the fugue from Bach's "Fantasy and Fugue in G minor." Lemare suddenly stopped and took notice. He took her over to the church and sat her on the bench beside him while he played the G minor. This is a sad story, because then Lemare went back to America and this was the last time little Iris ever saw her father.   John.    
(back) Subject: Re: Dedication Recital & comments - who built it? From: giwro@juno.com (Jonathan M Orwig) Date: Mon, 16 Feb 1998 13:52:32 -0800   On Mon, 16 Feb 1998 16:25:37 -0500 cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) writes: >Jonathan, >The new organ at Claremont UCC is?????   A Glatter-Götz III/78 tracker - I mentioned it last week here on the list. Pics available on the Northeast Organist web site <http://www.tneorg.com> under "Organbuilders" section. The organbuilder, Caspar von Glatter-Götz was for many years associated with Rieger Orgelbau of Austria before recently founding his own company.   **************** Jonathan Orwig Bethany Church, Redlands, CA Evensong Music, Media and Graphics http://members.aol.com/Evnsong/pgone.html   _____________________________________________________________________ You don't need to buy Internet access to use free Internet e-mail. Get completely free e-mail from Juno at http://www.juno.com Or call Juno at (800) 654-JUNO [654-5866]    
(back) Subject: Re: Listening to the organ (used to be Re: The organ on the WWW.) From: Ron Yost <musik@tcsn.net> Date: Mon, 16 Feb 1998 14:33:16 -0800   Hello Jacob, and Welcome to PipeChat! :)   I LOVE the fact we're attracting many 'young' folks!! (I know, we're all young in spirit .. I mean young in age, too. :)   Would you mind 'introducing' yourself to the group, Jacob? And, please, tell us a bit about what you do that's organ related?? Where you play, take lessons, whatever!   I'm so happy the youngsters have found a happy organ home here. The organ's future will shortly be in their hands.   Yours, Ron Yost, Paso Robles, Calif ... getting ANOTHER *whack* from El Nino today!! ICK!!!     >My parents figured that out last Christmas! Brilliant--then they could >give me organ CD's too! > >Christmas was fun. :-) > >Jacob Nelson    
(back) Subject: Re: Listening to the organ From: bombarde8@juno.com (Jason D. Comet) Date: Mon, 16 Feb 1998 16:10:46 -0500   >>I too have heard this argument.... yet in the music circles I've >traveled >>in, I haven't seen it too often. How would a man be able to tune a >>mixture, or 1' at top C if he couldn't hear it (as long as he wasn't >using >>a Strobotuner or other device)? How would women be able to use >mixtures or >>extensions of organ ranks if they couldn't stand it? ***************************** Every organic person I know who has heard me play and register and do dictation work at school, says that I would make a GREAT pipe voicer because I can hear approximatly 90% of all frequencies in about 70% of all dB levels, whereas my other relatives can only hear approximatly 60% of all fequencies and at about 30% of all dB levels. Now, I just have to learn how to make and voice pipes, then I'll be set! :-)   (P.S. This hasn't been scientifically proven, just by friends and relatives)   Later.............................................................................................................................................................................................   Jason Comet bombarde8@juno.com |\ | \ O   _____________________________________________________________________ You don't need to buy Internet access to use free Internet e-mail. Get completely free e-mail from Juno at http://www.juno.com Or call Juno at (800) 654-JUNO [654-5866]    
(back) Subject: Re: Listening to the organ (used to be Re: The organ on the WWW.) From: OrganAngel@aol.com Date: Mon, 16 Feb 1998 18:32:12 EST   In a message dated 98-02-16 14:17:09 EST, you write:   << >There must be something about women >and organs in general. (...) >Dick >>     You must mean "unmusicial" women!  
(back) Subject: Re: Listening to the organ (used to be Re: The organ on the WWW.) From: Otto Pebworth <opebwrth@gte.net> Date: Mon, 16 Feb 1998 19:32:31 -0500   Kevin Cartwright wrote: >   > That sounds like something my mother would say. I can't listen to ANY > organ recording when she is in the house. She always returns with > something like "not now" or "we need some peace and quiet" and just > about any other excuse you can think of... > ---> Kevin; Try "Music for a Quiet Cathedral" at a gentle level... she might like it :)   Otto  
(back) Subject: Re: Size 14 (mens) Converse organ shoes From: "Judy A. Ollikkala" <71431.2534@compuserve.com> Date: Mon, 16 Feb 1998 21:27:17 -0500   Bruce, how did you ever play the organ in snowshoes??  
(back) Subject: Re: Size 14 (mens) Converse organ shoes From: GRSCoLVR@aol.com Date: Mon, 16 Feb 1998 21:42:50 EST   Indeed Bruce,,,,How do you play the organ in snowshoes,,,or did you mean galoshes or boots perhaps,,,,,cannot envision anyone playing in real honest to goodness snowshoes. But then,,,perhaps it can be done,,,who knows...   Roc  
(back) Subject: Re: Listening to the organ (used to be Re: The organ on the WWW.) From: GHamil9709@aol.com Date: Mon, 16 Feb 1998 21:59:25 EST   In a message dated 98-02-16 13:57:18 EST, you write:   << There must be something about women and organs in general. >>   This is true! Women are more sensitive to high frequencies than men, as a rule, and in addition their hearing is more acute. That's why many women cannot stand to listen to a good hi-fi recording played at levels which I think are necessary to really get the full effect. Then there are those who revel in just being disagreeable, --- ( I didn't say that!). Gene hamilton  
(back) Subject: Conversation Evening From: Ruth S Bird <theraven@istar.ca> Date: Mon, 16 Feb 1998 23:01:53 -0500   Just a note to say I enjoyed it very much and that I am learning a lot from all you very talented and professional people.   Thanks, Sonja/ Ruth    
(back) Subject: Re: Dedication Recital & comments From: Ken <mewzishn@spec.net> Date: Mon, 16 Feb 1998 23:43:01 +0000   Jonathan M Orwig wrote:   > Well, > > Yesterday I attended the Dedication Recital of the new organ at > Claremont > UCC. here is the program, along with some comments at the end.   And the recitalist was........?   > NOVISSIMIS - Norberto Guinaldo > As clouds of rain that hide the sun... > The promised return > Dance of fury of the rod of iron > Libera me, Domine! > May eyes not see nor catch a glimpse > The new Jerusalem   This is a multi-movement work, or is this the poem upon which the work was based? It's not quite clear. Thanks for posting your comments! How would you categorize the sound? Manuel Rosales was very much involved in the project, in tonal terms if not in actual construction work.   Ken Sybesma        
(back) Subject: Re: Size 14 (mens) Converse organ shoes From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Mon, 16 Feb 1998 23:55:06 -0500   It wasn't easy. I was in Vermont and had parked my car in a snowdrift. I was delivered to the church by a kind fireman (drove me 30 miles), and I missed only half of the 9:15 service. Just didn't have time to change, although I did manage to get vested (first things first!). Thank heaven for flat pedal boards!!   bruce cornely o o o __________ o o o ago (dean) ohs o o __________ o o  
(back) Subject: Re: Size 14 (mens) Converse organ shoes From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Mon, 16 Feb 1998 23:57:02 -0500   You're right. A semantic slip on my part. They were snow boots, not snow shoes, although the length of a snow shoe might come in handy for playing chords!!   bruce cornely o o o __________ o o o ago (dean) ohs o o __________ o o  
(back) Subject: Re: Conversation Evening From: Bob Conway <conwayb@post.queensu.ca> Date: Mon, 16 Feb 1998 23:17:41 -0500   Sonja,   You are welcome to be with us, and I am glad to see that there are a lot of younger people joining in as well, I think that we need to encourage them to stay tuned, - as we say on the air!   I have already sent you the beer bread recipe, as an attachment, - if for some reason you are not able to read the attachment, let me know, and I can type it out for you.   Best Wishes,     Bob Conway <conwayb@post.queensu.ca> Classics Director and Organic DeeJay CFRC-FM 101.9 MHz Radio Queen's University Kingston, Ontario, K7L 3N6 CANADA    
(back) Subject: Re: Listening to the organ From: "Sean Haley" <newgershwin@hotmail.com> Date: Mon, 16 Feb 1998 21:20:27 PST   Jason, If you can hear that well you should try tuning pianos. It takes a lot of hearing ability (if you do it by ear rather than by electronics) and concentration. But voicing a pipe is a lot more involving than just listening to a frequency. If it were that easy many more people would be voicing organs. Just a thought,   Sean M. Haley /------------------------\ / Pianist,Organist, \ /Composer, Piano Technician. \ /------------------------------\     >Every organic person I know who has heard me play and register and do >dictation work at school, says that I would make a GREAT pipe voicer >because I can hear approximatly 90% of all frequencies in about 70% of>all dB levels, whereas my other relatives can only hear approximatly 60% >of all fequencies and at about 30% of all dB levels. Now, I just have to >learn how to make and voice pipes, then I'll be set! :-) > >(P.S. This hasn't been scientifically proven, just by friends and >relatives)   >Later >Jason Comet >bombarde8@juno.com     ______________________________________________________ Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Listening to the organ From: Mac Hayes <mach37@ptw.com> Date: Mon, 16 Feb 1998 21:35:14 -0800   Andrew Lane wrote: > ... a man and a woman who were > both perfectly average for their sex's hearing sensitivity pattern might > never know ... that they were perceiving middle and upper frequencies > differently as they listened to the same organ in the same place on the > same day.   MY hearing has changed in the last eight years or so (since age 52-3?). I knew I was gradually losing dB in the upper frequencies, since I had an audiometer test every year. I used to fly a lot, but the worst damage was done when I once fired a pistol that really did a job on my ears- this was before it was fashionable to wear earplugs. Anyway, at the age (see above) I noticed not only the usual symptoms of hearing going bad- people seem to mumble now and then, and at times everybody including on the TV seem to be lisping. But I don't need, or like, to increase the treble on the stereo when listening to music.   Then I noticed my piano seemed to have a narrow loudness peak about 2 octaves (very roughly) above middle C. And my car stereo also seemed to develop a frequency peak, again very narrow range at, oh maybe 4,000 cps? (I prefer the old term.) And then I helped a friend tune his Conn 904, and although the speaker system was non-standard (eight 5" speakers on a baffle board, unenclosed, and quite directional), there was that definite piercing peak somewhere in the top octave (at 8'), maybe 2 or 3 notes wide.   Someone commented on PIPORG-L or PipeChat several months back that they had received complaints that loud sounds were physically painful to "old folks." That sure seems to be true for me, but only in a very narrow frequency band. I am curious to see how this develops/changes as time goes by.   BTW, I have some heartburn about the way hearing tests are administered. They don't test enough frequencies. The top two freqs are 4000 and 8000 cps. Considering the narrow peaks in my hearing, it seems to me there should be more intermediate frequencies tested, and at least one higher freq, at somewhere between 10-15,000 cps.   -- Mac Hayes Time is what keeps everything from happening at once.      
(back) Subject: Re: Dedication Recital & comments From: giwro@juno.com (Jonathan M Orwig) Date: Mon, 16 Feb 1998 23:37:25 -0800         On Mon, 16 Feb 1998 23:43:01 +0000 Ken <mewzishn@spec.net> writes:   >And the recitalist was........? (Claremont UCC recital)   The Church organist, Dr. Carey Robertson   >> NOVISSIMIS - Norberto Guinaldo >> As clouds of rain that hide the sun... >> The promised return >> Dance of fury of the rod of iron >> Libera me, Domine! >> May eyes not see nor catch a glimpse >> The new Jerusalem > >This is a multi-movement work, or is this the poem upon which the work >was based? It's not quite clear. Thanks for posting your comments! How >would you categorize the sound? Manuel Rosales was very much involved >in the project, in tonal terms if not in actual construction work. > >Ken Sybesma> > Novissimis is a multi-movement work - programmatic - The Last Things, in the order of human events: death, judgement, heaven and hell. If you would be interested in the program notes for this piece I would be glad to email them privately (they're quite long). The sound of this piece: take equal parts of Messian, Alain, Hakim and Langlais. Shake liberally until mixed. Served best on an eclectic organ.... :-)   The sound of the instrument??? Stunning. Hair-raising. Ravishing. If you have ever heard the Rosales instrument at Trinity in Portland, just put a little more forcefulness on the reeds, and you have it. This one speaks with a definite romantic voice. Several things caught my attention: Full honk on Swell with the shutters closed is VERY quiet.... open those shutters, though, and the beast ROARS! Very effective. Also, the soft strings can be made to virtually disappear! The Glory-Horn is very Spanish in character - to be sure, assertive even over full organ, but not like most American chamades. Lots of "smack" ..... reminiscent of Toledo Cathedral. The lower register of the positif Krummhorn had a delightful reedy "clarinet" sound to it - very effective. Almost sounded like a Cavaille-Coll voice (which doesn't surprise me - Manuel Rosales has studied several of his instruments, measured them, etc) Pedal 32' and 16' Bombardes are not for the faint of heart - 16-footer sounds almost like a Willis Ophecleide!   **************** Jonathan Orwig Bethany Church, Redlands, CA Evensong Music, Media and Graphics http://members.aol.com/Evnsong/pgone.html   _____________________________________________________________________ You don't need to buy Internet access to use free Internet e-mail. Get completely free e-mail from Juno at http://www.juno.com Or call Juno at (800) 654-JUNO [654-5866]    
(back) Subject: Re: Size 14 (mens) Converse organ shoes From: PHarri5833@aol.com Date: Tue, 17 Feb 1998 03:23:04 EST   This dialogue reminds of the possibly apocryphal tale of my former teacher, the late Dr Conrad Eden of Durham Cathedral.   After a student had used incorrect footwear as an excuse for inaccurate pedalling, Dr Eden arrived for his next lesson wearing jackboots and proceeded to demonstrate how with the right technique, the style of footwear becomes unimportant!   I've heard this tale from several sources but never from the student in question. I am curious to know if anyone on this list can verify it authenticity - ideally by having been that student!   Peter Harrison Ramsbottom, GB