PipeChat Digest #260 - Friday, February 20, 1998
 
Re: Lenten Music & the NYSE
  by Vernon Moeller <vernonm@ccsi.com>
Re: Lenten Postlude
  by John Sinila <js0059@epfl2.epflbalto.org>
Organ {Dead or Alive}
  by Richard Wolf <floww@webtv.net>
Organs Continued
  by Richard Wolf <floww@webtv.net>
Re: The future of the organ
  by John L. Speller <jlspeller@stlnet.com>
Organ-Dead or Alive
  by karencl@worldnet.att.net <karencl@worldnet.att.net>
Re: Organ-Dead or Alive
  by Kenneth O. Woods <kow987@dice.crane.navy.mil>
WurliTzer Styles-Cross posted
  by W. Scarboro <scarboro@digital.net>
Re: Organ-Dead or Alive
  by <pniki@firstavenue.com>
Re: Organs Continued
  by Bob Loesch <rrloesch@jps.net>
Re: Organ-Dead or Alive
  by Bob Loesch <rrloesch@jps.net>
Rectial - Pensacola FL, CROSS-POSTED
  by David Scribner <david@blackiris.com>
Re: Organ-Dead or Alive
  by Richard Wolf <floww@webtv.net>
Re: Organ-Dead or Alive
  by John L. Speller <jlspeller@stlnet.com>
Re: Organ-Dead or Alive - a looong reply
  by Jonathan M Orwig <giwro@juno.com>
Re: Organ {Dead or Alive}
  by <GHamil9709@aol.com>
Re: Organs Continued
  by Shirley <pnst@itw.com>
****New Organs for Sale***
  by <TheNEORG@aol.com>
Re: Pregnant Pauses, Talking During Offertories, etc.
  by <George.Greene@rossnutrition.com>
Re: Organ {Dead or Alive}
  by Jim Zimmerman <zimmerman@chem.purdue.edu>
Re: Organ {Dead or Alive}
  by Shirley <pnst@itw.com>
 


(back) Subject: Re: Lenten Music & the NYSE From: Vernon Moeller <vernonm@ccsi.com> Date: Fri, 20 Feb 1998 08:43:53 -0600   Yesterday, Karen said:   >I am often reminded of a most appropriate quote which >appeared at the top of each Sunday's bulletin in the church where I >grew up. It said: "Be silent, be thoughtful, be reverent, for this is the >house of the Lord. Before the service speak to God. During the service, let >God speak to you. After the service, speak to one another."   Since this topic comes up now and again, I 'clipped' one message on this topic from the other organ list; that organist quoted what was at the top of his church's worship bulletin: "The prelude is a veil which separates our secular lives from our sacred ones - if you must whisper, let it be to God." Heavy stuff, if you ask me, but beautifully worded.   >It's bad enough when the congregation sounds like the floor of >the New York Stock Exchange BEFORE the service. I personally feel that >AFTER the service is the time for people to talk to each other, so to >me it is pointless to prepare a postlude. Never, in all of my life, >have I attended a church where people sat respectfully and listened to >the postlude. Possibly some of you have this in your churches. If you >do, you're a lucky camper indeed!   I used to play organ at St John's UMC here in Austin, and one couple in particular never failed to remain seated for the entire postlude, after which they would *applaud*. Got me all misty-eyed at least once.   >Someone on the list recently wrote, remember that God hears what you   >play. Man, have I ever taken THAT ONE to my heart and hugged it.   A wise minister in my church back home said that we all minister to each other. I hadn't noticed that quote, so I'm so glad you mentioned it, Karen. Thanks for ministering to me and the rest of the list. I'll try to remember the invisible member of my congregation whenever I play - at least He will take the time to listen to what I play.   \/\/\    
(back) Subject: Re: Lenten Postlude From: John Sinila <js0059@epfl2.epflbalto.org> Date: Fri, 20 Feb 1998 11:26:15 -0500 (EST)   Judy-what is the name of this new edition of the "Eight Little Preludes and Fugues" and who publishes it? Your information is greatly appreciated.   John M. Sinila Shipppensburg, PA   On Wed, 18 Feb 1998, Judy A. Ollikkala wrote:   > Last year George Bozeman played the entire book of "Eight Little Preludes > and Fugues" of a new edition, with baroque fingering, at the dedication > recital of his restoration of the George Stevens tracker in Rindge NH, they > were delightful and so is the organ. > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >  
(back) Subject: Organ {Dead or Alive} From: floww@webtv.net (Richard Wolf) Date: Fri, 20 Feb 1998 10:23:15 -0600   The "State of the Organ" is tenuous. Churches are going to keyboards played by pianists. Pipeorgans big and small sit silent wishing to be played and heard.Organs in concert halls with some exceptions have become decorations. [ie. Boston Symphony Hall & others] You rarely here of a concert where a symphony orchestra has an organ and orchestra work on the program. People basically think organs are for use only in church and funeral parlors. A teenage friend of mine thought organs were for GEEKS untill he sat down and played  
(back) Subject: Organs Continued From: floww@webtv.net (Richard Wolf) Date: Fri, 20 Feb 1998 10:43:47 -0600   I hit the wrong key. I even took him to a theatre where he tried out a 4/m Barton. There is a lack of good musical education in our schools where introductions to subjects including organs should be part of the curiculum.I was lucky to attend a school that had a 3/m Moller.I became the school organist and our concerts include combined numbers with organ. choirs,orchestra, and band. Rollerskating organs have lost to records and tapes.It's rare that even electronics are used.People come into my house and don't even comment on the AGO console in my living room. Part of the problem is the aloofness and excentricity in the field. "Mine is better than yours","Don't touch the organ, You'll break it"."Theatre organs aren't organs",etc.,etc.. I am sure some of you are going to take these comments lighltly but when is the last time you had an inquisitive discussion with a neophyte to the world of organ. "nuff said" [for now]   Dick  
(back) Subject: Re: The future of the organ From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com> Date: Fri, 20 Feb 1998 11:13:57 -0600 (CST)   Richard Wolf mentioned that some people think those interested in organs are geeks. This reminds me that there is a very interesting website called -- wait for it! -- "Organ Geeks Online." You can find it at <http://home.ptd.net/~orgango>   John.    
(back) Subject: Organ-Dead or Alive From: "karencl@worldnet.att.net" <karencl@worldnet.att.net> Date: Fri, 20 Feb 1998 12:55:42 -0800   Richard Wolf wrote: > > The "State of the Organ" is tenuous. > Churches are going to keyboards played by pianists. Pipeorgans big and > small sit silent wishing to be played and heard.Organs in concert halls > with some exceptions have become decorations.   Dick: Our church is entering a long range building program with a new sanctuary planned for maybe 10 years down the road. The architect met with the music staff a while back for input. I mentioned at the minimum providing a place for a pipe organ - a casual wave of the hand from him "Oh, we hardly ever put pipe organs in churches any more. They're going more to canned music, keyboards and the like. And you can get so much more for so much less money with electronic - and they sound the same." So I said, Oh no, I have to disagree - they certainly don't sound the same. Well, he says, of course to a trained ear.... Our pastor was heard to express similar sentiments. When you face this you-know-what - what can you do? Karen  
(back) Subject: Re: Organ-Dead or Alive From: kow987@dice.crane.navy.mil (Kenneth O. Woods) Date: Fri, 20 Feb 98 13:11:59 EST   > > Dick: > Our church is entering a long range building program with a new > sanctuary planned for maybe 10 years down the road. Ours too. > met with the music staff a while back for input. I doubt that I will be consulted We must make our choices. I don't expect to be playing at my current church much longer.   -- Kenneth O. Woods kow987@dice.crane.navy.mil  
(back) Subject: WurliTzer Styles-Cross posted From: " W. Scarboro" <scarboro@digital.net> Date: Fri, 20 Feb 1998 13:04:58 -0500     Dear List Members,     I need some information on the following WurliTzer Styles:     Style 260 Special, Style F 3M, Style 240, and Style B Special.     Thanks,   Will Scarboro   **************************************************** Will Scarboro Organ Historian Organist, Pineda Presbyterian Church, Melbourne, Florida U.S.A 1996 OHS E. Power Biggs Fellow Municipal Organ Research Project Master of the Archives-Space Coast A.G.O ****************************************************    
(back) Subject: Re: Organ-Dead or Alive From: pniki@firstavenue.com Date: Fri, 20 Feb 1998 13:29:55 -0500   Karen wrote:   Our church is entering a long range building program with a new sanctuary planned for maybe 10 years down the road. The architect met with the music staff a while back for input. I mentioned at the minimum providing a place for a pipe organ - a casual wave of the hand from him "Oh, we hardly ever put pipe organs in churches any more. They're going more to canned music, keyboards and the like. And you can get so much more for so much less money with electronic - and they sound the same." So I said, Oh no, I have to disagree - they certainly don't sound the same. Well, he says, of course to a trained ear.... Our pastor was heard to express similar sentiments. When you face this you-know-what - what can you do? **************** One question: Were the pastor's sentiments in agreement with you or the architect? Context made it a little unlcear. If he agrees with the architect, proceed directly to (2) below!   It would seem to me that there are two things to do. 1) The church can get a new architect or 2) you have ten years to look for a new job. The only other thing we can pray for is that the go to canned sermons when they can the music.     From what I've been seeing in recent months in various journals, the pendulum is swinging back in mainstream churches and organs are starting to get interesting for people again. You don't think it has anything to do with organ builders building French horn and cor anglais stops instead of ranketts and quarter-length squawks, do you?   Peter Nikiforuk       Message routed through FIRSTline's SMTP Gateway.   First Avenue Information Systems Inc. People. Solutions. Service. (519) 746-5630    
(back) Subject: Re: Organs Continued From: Bob Loesch <rrloesch@jps.net> Date: Fri, 20 Feb 1998 10:21:00 -0800   At 10:43 2/20/98 -0600, Dick wrote: >There is a >lack of good musical education in our schools where introductions to >subjects including organs should be part of the curiculum.   Please don't place all of the blame on the schools. True, they should share some, but I think that MOST of us associated with the organ, either playing, building, or just listening were exposed to good music of ALL types, classical, church, popular, old standards, etc. as children (read AT HOME) and therefore had something to base our appreciation on.   >I was lucky to >attend a school that had a 3/m Moller.I became the school organist and >our concerts include combined numbers with organ. choirs,orchestra, and >band.   You were indeed lucky, Dick! My school had an OLD Balwin toaster (and I say that without malice; there were so many tubes in it that the top of the console would get HOT to the touch after a few hours) that was only used when I or my older brother played it. The teachers incharge of assemblies, plays, rallies, etc. would fit the organ into the program, but only if either of us approached THEM and ASKED to be included...   >People come into my house and don't even comment on >the AGO console in my living room.   They can't help noticing my interest. Two pianos, one a player, the other a reproducer, and an AEolian Orchestrelle player reed organ in the living room. An Estey Model G 2m/ped reed organ, Morton photoplayer, and LOTS of pipe organ parts in the garage "studio".   >Part of the problem is the aloofness and excentricity in the field. >"Mine is better than yours","Don't touch the organ, You'll break >it"."Theatre organs aren't organs",etc.,etc.. >I am sure some of you are going to take these comments lighltly but when is >the last time you had an inquisitive discussion with a neophyte to the >world of organ.   That's true! Some of us (and I include myself) ARE eccentric, provincial, whatever... However, I've had much interest shown at my instruments. The players help. After playing a roll, I can sit down and show them that a PERSON can play those things, too! I don't think I'll make many 'converts' to the organ, but I do try to leave them with a greater appreciation for it on some level, either the playing of them, or the intricacies of building/working on them.   >"nuff said" [for now]   AMEN! I'll get off my soap-box now! Have a GOOD DAY, everyone!     Regards,   Bob        
(back) Subject: Re: Organ-Dead or Alive From: Bob Loesch <rrloesch@jps.net> Date: Fri, 20 Feb 1998 10:25:07 -0800   At 12:55 2/20/98 -0800, you wrote: > Our church is entering a long range building program with a new >sanctuary planned for maybe 10 years down the road. The architect >met with the music staff a while back for input. I mentioned at the >minimum providing a place for a pipe organ - a casual wave of the hand >from him "Oh, we hardly ever put pipe organs in churches any more. >They're going more to canned music, keyboards and the like. And you >can get so much more for so much less money with electronic - and they >sound the same." So I said, Oh no, I have to disagree - they certainly >don't sound the same. Well, he says, of course to a trained ear.... > Our pastor was heard to express similar sentiments. When you face >this you-know-what - what can you do? > Karen   Karen, that's EASY! You find a new architect!     Regards,   Bob        
(back) Subject: Rectial - Pensacola FL, CROSS-POSTED From: David Scribner <david@blackiris.com> Date: Fri, 20 Feb 1998 13:20:55 -0600   For those in the area of Pensacola, Fl this coming Sunday, February 22, 1998 the Pensacola Chapter of the AGO iare co-sponsoring with the "Music at Christ Church" series   Stweart Wayne Foster the winner of the First Dallas international Organ Competition   The recital will take place at 3:30 PM with a reception following.   Christ Church Palafox and Wright Streets Pensacola, FL   For more information and Mr. Foster's program you can check the Chapter's Web Page at: http://www.pensacola-ago.org/organs/foster.html   For information about the Gabriel Kney Organ (1975, III/60) at Christ Church go to: http://www.pensacola-ago.org/organs/ccpns.html   If you are in the area we hope that you will attend. If you do, please look for me at the reception.   David   ************************** David Scribner Member, Executive Board, Pensacola Chapter AGO Webmaster and Editor, "The West Florida Organist"      
(back) Subject: Re: Organ-Dead or Alive From: floww@webtv.net (Richard Wolf) Date: Fri, 20 Feb 1998 13:25:39 -0600   Karen [and others] How about having some sessions where you invite members to a mini concert some evening.[coffee& donuts optional] Familiarize them with the organ. Show them the varieties of sounds [ppp--sfz]. If possible show them the pipework. You may possibly gain support for a pipeorgan vs.pipeless. A rebuild of the existing organ may prove to be a better investment than an electronic.   Just a thought,   Dick  
(back) Subject: Re: Organ-Dead or Alive From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com> Date: Fri, 20 Feb 1998 13:34:43 -0600 (CST)   At 10:25 AM 2/20/98 -0800, Bob Loesch wrote:   >Karen, that's EASY! You find a new architect!   This is absolutely right. There are good architects and bad architects, just as there are good organbuilders and bad organbuilders. And mediocre ones. I wouldn't mind betting that an architect with no understanding of the needs of church music will make as much of a mess of the rest of the building as of the musical arrangements. The same is probably true of pastors. We have three architects in our congregation, and all three believe that churches should have pipe organs (one of them plays the organ himself) and that churches should not have carpets. A neighboring church has just had its sanctuary done, and that architect has provided a polished marble floor that is to die for. That architect knows what he is doing too. Meanwhile down the road they are building a much needed new branch of the public library. The treatment of form is quite dreadful, most of the detailing is hideous and the whole thing is extremely gimmicky. It is very gratifying to find that the three architects in our church feel the same way as me about that as well. Some of the best organ cases in England -- Norwich Cathedral, Corpus Christ College Cambridge, Trinity College Oxford, etc. -- were designed by a single architect, the late Stephen Dykes-Bower who was also an organist in his spare time and whose brother, Sir John Dykes-Bower was organist of St. Paul's Cathedral. See if you can find someone like him.   John.    
(back) Subject: Re: Organ-Dead or Alive - a looong reply From: giwro@juno.com (Jonathan M Orwig) Date: Fri, 20 Feb 1998 11:35:00 -0800   On Fri, 20 Feb 1998 13:29:55 -0500 pniki@firstavenue.com writes: >>From what I've been seeing in recent months in various journals, the pendulum >is swinging back in mainstream churches and organs are starting to get interesting >for people again. You don't think it has anything to do with organ builders building >French horn and cor anglais stops instead of ranketts and quarter-length squawks, >do you? >   Yes, I do! And not only that,I maintain the main reasons the organ and organists have fallen out of favor is because many organists play with little emotion or imagination. Every time I substitute somewhere, I get the "I've never heard our organ sound like that" comment or "It's fun to sing hymns when you play". In addition, many of us play stuff that is only palatable to other organists. As dear as the 20th century stuff is to some of our hearts, as much as those composers were and are geniuses, MOST CHURCH PEOPLE COULDN'T GIVE A FLYING RIP! I only developed a taste for the tonally astringent Messian, Guillou, Alain, etc. after PLAYING some of it or repeated listening. Some of it is still not my favorite genre, but I can appreciate it better now. Many organists are not people-persons (no wonder - some of the music we play requires us to live at a console for hours on end) and so (at worst) alienate people with our poor people skills or (at best) are ignored because we do not have the personality to reach out. Those of us who ARE very social beings (like myself) find it hard to spend hours at practice - we like social interaction too much.   Put that together with 20-30 years of organbuilding that narrowly focuses on one style or another, giving us organs best suited to play music from a narrow genre, and it is no wonder we get bored! I am all for study tours to play music on period instruments, or period replicas on University campuses, but a church instrument needs to be eclectic! I don't care what type of action - EP, DirectElectric,Tracker- instruments can be built that will do justice to a majority of the literature and accompany singing and choirs well. After all the comments I have heard over the years concerning congregations that would not listen to preludes, offertories and postludes, you would think we would realize the only time people pay attention is during the hymn singing and MAYBE the anthem. How many of us waste 5-10 hours a week preparing music no one listens to and let our hymn-playing skills squeak by with running through the hymns once or twice? Shame on us! How many of us are either too protective or too busy to let someone try "our" instrument? Shame on us! Folks, we have no one but ourselves to blame, and I am guilty as the rest.   As to the organ being dead - I think not. I just attended a packed house for a dedication recital - over 1000 people and an organ that I'm sure cost over $1 million. Some of the churches will indeed leave organs behind, but I think we will see a resurgence of its use over the next 20 years - however, only if we reach out and strive to be better at what we do!   Thanks for letting me sound off! **************** Jonathan Orwig Bethany Church, Redlands, CA Evensong Music, Media and Graphics - Organ, Keyboard & Choral Music http://members.aol.com/Evnsong/pgone.html   _____________________________________________________________________ You don't need to buy Internet access to use free Internet e-mail. Get completely free e-mail from Juno at http://www.juno.com Or call Juno at (800) 654-JUNO [654-5866]    
(back) Subject: Re: Organ {Dead or Alive} From: GHamil9709@aol.com Date: Fri, 20 Feb 1998 16:12:43 EST   In a message dated 98-02-20 11:36:06 EST, you write:   << The "State of the Organ" is tenuous. Churches are going to keyboards played by pianists. >>   It's true! One large church in this area spent a mint installing a new 3-manual Rodgers. Their regular organist moved to another locale. The new organist, hired to take her place, prefers to play his keyboard -- and does!   Another church had no organ but received one from a donor. No one in this church could or would play it. They preferred guitars, a keyboard and drums. They sold the Rodgers for a fraction of its value.                  
(back) Subject: Re: Organs Continued From: Shirley <pnst@itw.com> Date: Fri, 20 Feb 1998 16:08:33   At 10:43 02/20/98 -0600, you wrote: >.People come into my house and don't even comment on >the AGO console in my living room.   It never fails, every Halloween, we ALWAYS have a neighborhood kid (I'm beginning to think it's the same one) who takes one look at the Conn 3-decker and says, "Wow!! Lookit that PIANO!!!" Of course, the Baldwin 6' grand is right there opposite the Conn, but the three manuals of this glorified piano gets their attention.   AARGH!   Others that come to the house -- from contractors to neighbors -- always ask "who plays" when they see the organ. Again, the piano, lid up and all, goes unnoticed.   AARGH!   So it's up to us to educate them, right?   AARGH!   :)   --Shirley  
(back) Subject: ****New Organs for Sale*** From: TheNEORG@aol.com Date: Fri, 20 Feb 1998 16:38:55 EST   Hey folks!   Just wanted to relay a message from the Organ Clearing House...several new organs have been listed with their pictures on the Instruments Available page. HOpe this is helpful.   http://www.tneorg.com/och   Len   Len Levasseur The Northeast Organist tneorg@aol.com PO Box 747 http://www.tneorg.com Lawrence, MA 01842-1547 Fax:1-508-970-1133 Phone: 1-800-841-4030    
(back) Subject: Re: Pregnant Pauses, Talking During Offertories, etc. From: George.Greene@rossnutrition.com Date: Fri, 20 Feb 1998 16:47:07 -0500   I'd just like to say a big THANK YOU VERY MUCH to all of the nice folks who responded to my post about the congregation talking during offertories. Your responses were very helpful and often very entertaining; I can't wait to try some of them out. It's also nice to know that I have company in the same boat!   Thanks again! : )     george   2222222 2 George Greene, Senior Chemist 2222222 Analytical Research and Development 2 Abbott Laboratories, Ross Products Division 2222222 D104115-RP4-2 GGGGGGGG 625 Cleveland Avenue G Columbus, Ohio 43215 __ ___o G GGGG Voice 614-624-3362, FAX 614-624-7270 _____ _`\ <._ G G George.Greene@RossNutrition.Com ___ (_)/ (_) GGGGGGGG   ..    
(back) Subject: Re: Organ {Dead or Alive} From: Jim Zimmerman <zimmerman@chem.purdue.edu> Date: Fri, 20 Feb 1998 17:02:03 -0500   At 10:23 AM 2/20/98 -0600, Richard Wolf wrote: >The "State of the Organ" is tenuous. <snip>   >A teenage friend of mine thought organs were for GEEKS untill >he sat down and played >   Richard's last sentence answers part of the question. How do we expose the organ for the wonderful instrument that it is? When watching a wedding or any "church" scene on television, how often do you hear a REAL organ? Far more often than not, the "organ" heard is a recording of some hideous sounding electronic thing. If this is what the general public perceives as an organ, no wonder people think organs are for geeks. Please don't think I'm slamming electronic organs. I own one and practice on it every day. However, there are so many fantastic pipe organ recordings that a TV studio need not stoop to using the awful organ recordings they use.     ** Jim Zimmerman zimmerman@chem.purdue.edu **    
(back) Subject: Re: Organ {Dead or Alive} From: Shirley <pnst@itw.com> Date: Fri, 20 Feb 1998 17:21:55   At 17:02 02/20/98 -0500, Jim Zimmerman wrote:   >However, there are so many fantastic pipe organ recordings that a TV studio >need not stoop to using the awful organ recordings they use.     Also, since most USA TV production is done in the Los Angeles area any more, why not hire a REAL organist, record them at the site of the pipe organ, and just splice it into the sound track when it's needed?     The thing that galls me more than anything else, though, is when they give a close-up of the hands and the music is NOTHING like what the actor is faking. "Mr. Holland's Opus" was close. There was only one or two scenes I think where it actually looked like Richard Dreyfuss was faking... the rest of the time, they kept the camera shots away from the keyboard, and Dreyfuss faked in the general vicinity of the correct end of the keyboard, so it looked realistic enough.   "The Competition" was better done, tho. I think Amy Irving really was studying to be a concert pianist, and did have that literature -- at least the bits they filmed -- under her fingers, as did the rest of the piano-playing cast.   To bring this back to organs again, for those who are church organists, why not arrange with the resident preschool to have them bring their students by the console during their music time, and you could show them broad things like loud and soft (or quiet, since "soft" is the opposite of "hard" to a little kid), high and low, differences in timbre between a trumpet and a flute, things like that.   Or, have a Sunday school class, say third grade, visit the sanctuary for a class, or a series even. (This would give the young kids a better appreciation and respect for what goes on in there on Sunday morning, too.) The Sunday School teacher can teach them about prayers, the significance of liturgy and why it's there (if you're in a liturgical setting), and she might even teach them a hymn. When it comes to the organ, that's your turn to shine, *showing* them the sounds you use for hymn-accompaniment. Ask them what it would be like to sing the hymn without a piano or organ, and they'll get the idea that accompaniment is important.   Culminating activity might be a 15-minute worship service: A 90-second prelude by you (having told the kids the reason for the prelude. This is a good opportunity to teach these young churchgoers the value of being quiet during that time.) One verse of a familiar hymn A prayer (of confession if they're old enough to understand this) Kyrie and/or Gloria Patri (if you use it.... I'm going by our Presby. service here) The Sunday School teacher's lesson for the day (3 minutes, no more) The offering (for their Sunday School offerings) Doxology (or whatever response your church uses here) Another verse of a hymn or song they know Benediction (maybe the pastor could pop his/her head in the door for this) 15-second Postlude   Vernon Moeller, was it you that offered Organ 101 to your congregation every so often? How effective was the series?   --Shirley