PipeChat Digest #261 - Friday, February 20, 1998
 
RE: Organ {Dead or Alive}
  by Wildhirt, Richard <Richard.Wildhirt@PSS.Boeing.com>
Re: Organ {Dead or Alive}
  by Richard Wolf <floww@webtv.net>
Re: Organ {Dead or Alive}
  by Richard Wolf <floww@webtv.net>
Re: Organs Continued
  by <FireAlarmz@aol.com>
JUST BE GLAD YOU CAN PLAY, DARN IT!!!
  by <TonyIn219@aol.com>
Re: Organ {Dead or Alive}
  by Shirley <pnst@itw.com>
Re: Organ {Dead or Alive}
  by Shirley <pnst@itw.com>
Re: Organs Continued
  by Roger Pariseau <grinder@west.net>
Re: Organ {Dead or Alive}
  by Richard Wolf <floww@webtv.net>
Re: Organ {Dead or Alive}
  by Richard Wolf <floww@webtv.net>
Re: Organ {Dead or Alive}
  by Richard Wolf <floww@webtv.net>
Re: Organ-Dead or Alive - a looong reply
  by Judy A. Ollikkala <71431.2534@compuserve.com>
Registration HELP
  by Ruth  Bird <theraven@istar.ca>
To Bob Conway/Bread
  by Ruth  Bird <theraven@istar.ca>
Re: Organs Continued
  by Shirley <pnst@itw.com>
Re: Organ {Dead or Alive}
  by Shirley <pnst@itw.com>
Re: Organ-Dead or Alive - a looong reply
  by Richard Wolf <floww@webtv.net>
Re: Organ {Dead or Alive}
  by <danbel@earthlink.net>
Re: Organ {Dead or Alive}
  by Richard Wolf <floww@webtv.net>
Re: Organs Continued
  by Kevin Cartwright <kevin1@alaweb.com>
Re: Organs Continued
  by Kevin Cartwright <kevin1@alaweb.com>
Re: Organ {Dead or Alive}
  by Richard Wolf <floww@webtv.net>
Re: Organ {Dead or Alive}
  by Kevin Cartwright <kevin1@alaweb.com>
Re: Organ {Dead or Alive}
  by Kevin Cartwright <kevin1@alaweb.com>
Re: Organ {Dead or Alive}
  by Shirley <pnst@itw.com>
Re: Organ {Dead or Alive}
  by Kevin Cartwright <kevin1@alaweb.com>
Re: Organ-Dead or Alive
  by Otto Pebworth <opebwrth@gte.net>
Re: Organ-Dead or Alive
  by <SCoonrod@aol.com>
 


(back) Subject: RE: Organ {Dead or Alive} From: "Wildhirt, Richard" <Richard.Wildhirt@PSS.Boeing.com> Date: Fri, 20 Feb 1998 14:56:41 -0800   > To bring this back to organs again, for those who are church > organists, why > not arrange with the resident preschool to have them bring their > students > by the console during their music time, and you could show them broad > things like loud and soft (or quiet, since "soft" is the opposite of > "hard" > to a little kid), high and low, differences in timbre between a > trumpet and > a flute, things like that. > > Or, have a Sunday school class, say third grade, visit the sanctuary > for a > class, or a series even. (This would give the young kids a better > appreciation and respect for what goes on in there on Sunday morning, > too.) > The Sunday School teacher can teach them about prayers, the > significance > of liturgy and why it's there (if you're in a liturgical setting), and > she > might even teach them a hymn. When it comes to the organ, that's your > turn > to shine, *showing* them the sounds you use for hymn-accompaniment. > Ask > them what it would be like to sing the hymn without a piano or organ, > and > they'll get the idea that accompaniment is important. > I have done variations on both these themes with great success.   I have taken both my Sunday school class and my youth choir up into the chamber. My church has a Rodgers, but they were still impressed at the immense speaker system and its placement. I covered different sounds and volumes. They continue to ask me if they can go back up there some time.   My kids' school has their fourth grade classes make an annual pilgrimage to the local Pizza and Pipes. The Sunday afternoon organist works at the school and is able to demonstrate the 3/18 Wurlitzer quite thoroughly. It's a big hit with the kids, especially since the trip includes lunch.    
(back) Subject: Re: Organ {Dead or Alive} From: floww@webtv.net (Richard Wolf) Date: Fri, 20 Feb 1998 17:04:34 -0600   Here I am again. I appreciate the attention my remarks are receiving. [re: comments about movies & music] Most of you will remember "Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea" and Bach amongst the seaweed. A movie palace was to be divided into a two screen venue and the organ was to be removed. I took my choirs to the theatre and had them escorted into a pitch black space. When all were seated.I began playing the Toccata & Fugue [d-minor of course]. As slowly I rose from the pit [console included] , the lights were turned on slowly until the theatre shown in all it's glory. It was a sad moment when I pushed the down button for the last time. The kids in the choir thanked me for playing "CAPTAIN NEMO'S SONG'. I still get goosebumps when I think about the experience. The organ was a 3/m Kimball.   Dick  
(back) Subject: Re: Organ {Dead or Alive} From: floww@webtv.net (Richard Wolf) Date: Fri, 20 Feb 1998 17:11:34 -0600   PS. That organ is alive and well in another theatre after many years in storage.   Dick  
(back) Subject: Re: Organs Continued From: FireAlarmz@aol.com Date: Fri, 20 Feb 1998 18:16:06 EST   Shirley-- if 1.your (Conn) organ gets a *lot* of attention 2. your grand piano is virtually UNnoticed   (both by "lay" people)   THEN: why are conservatories and music schools *crowded* with piano students, and why are the same *hurting* for organ students, including your alma mater, which dropped its church organ program? Even Curtis Institute has, I am told, THREE organ majors! Or maybe it's four...   **I** can't figure it! Anybody got any ideas?!   Scratching my head, Bill Miller, FPC Trenton NJ  
(back) Subject: JUST BE GLAD YOU CAN PLAY, DARN IT!!! From: TonyIn219@aol.com Date: Fri, 20 Feb 1998 18:45:07 EST   This goes out to that thread about people who play for company and get insulted:   I've noticed that more and more people have little or no knowledge of music, having learned everything they know from watching MTV or listening to CDs.   I lose more friends because they are sharply critical of my "strange" interest in theatre organ music and yet the only reason they can give for their interest in certain popular music is due to an artist's latest video on VH1, or their "look" or what radio station their music gets played on. The assumption is that if it gets played on VH1's prime time alternative music show it must be good.   What I've noticed that is that we are increasingly living in an era where people are becoming trained to be passive "listeners" and "experiencers" who are conditioned to hear only 2-minute songs or even shorter segments as point- and-click .wav files on the Internet.   Is it no wonder that they can't hear a whole Sonata when a long song, to them, has more than four 64-beat verses in 4/4 time?   When people grown up from infancy with such short attention spans, all reinforced by a channel surfing remote-control mentality, is it any wonder that our kids get diagnosed with Attention Deficit Disorder and eat Ritalin in order concentrate on one textbook for a whole semester?   My advice to all who feel insulted when people can't listen to them for more than a minute or two:   Try to find the gift even in what feels like a negative. You have a dual gift of being able to both CREATE beautiful music AND appreciate it in its entirety. Your audience cannot. Pity them.   I am a firm believer that my musical abilites give me access to parts of my soul and my emotions that I could not get at any other way. Playing piano or theatre organ helps me access memories, deal with my past, feel my emotions, feel extreme joy, even cry.   Without my emotions, which are an expression of my truest and highest self, I will die young. So pity the people who feel they need to block their emotions by taking pills, smoking cigarettes or ignoring or negating their own God- given musical skills.   When I look at the tragedies like this unfolding before me, I have a hard time listening to ongoing threads like the one trying to compare electronics to pipes (apples and oranges). At least the people are playing SOMETHING!!!   As a former trucker, I try to avoid looking down my nose at drivers who "cheat" themselves out of the raw experience of driving by spoiling themselves by:   - using electric power windows instead of the hissy air-powered window/guillotines found on big Peterbilts.   - driving down a highway in "Drive" with automatic transmissions (as opposed to double-clutched, unsynchronized, 15-speed transmissions), or   - missing out on valuable road-rage by pushing a little button on their steering wheel to activate a tinny horn instead of yanking on an overhead cord and sending 120 lbs. of compressed air through a five-tone, Amtrak-style "Cm6" trumpet air horn.   Now THAT'S living folks!!!!   Either way, the important thing is that we get out of the house and away from the TV sets and DRIVE, in much the same way that I turn on my 300-watt LOWREY and the 300-watt extension speaker and make my little cottage on a sand dune sound like the House on the Rock instead of sticking Lyn Larsen CDs in my stereo changer and calling myself a professional organist.   God isn't America AWESOME???     John Carrington Tonyin219@aol.com Chesterton, Indiana Theatre Organist and Trucker Bear Extraordinaire  
(back) Subject: Re: Organ {Dead or Alive} From: Shirley <pnst@itw.com> Date: Fri, 20 Feb 1998 18:31:51   At 17:21 02/20/98, I wrote:   >To bring this back to organs again, for those who are church organists, why >not arrange with the resident preschool to have them bring their students >by the console during their music time, and you could show them broad >things like loud and soft (or quiet, since "soft" is the opposite of "hard" >to a little kid), high and low, differences in timbre between a trumpet and >a flute, things like that.     I just read through the first part of this post again, and realized that "high and low" to a little kid are geographical locations... high is "up there" and low is "down there". I have seen a number of music teachers try to help their students to sing "high" by arcing their hand above their head, and standing on tiptoes, while singing low involves a frown and strongly planted feet. One really has no bearing on the other.   Be careful, then, in presenting these concepts to preschoolers.... high to them is not high in sound.... pitch is a learned skill.   --Shirley  
(back) Subject: Re: Organ {Dead or Alive} From: Shirley <pnst@itw.com> Date: Fri, 20 Feb 1998 18:42:55   Dick, what theatre was this? I have a very special place in my heart for a certain 3/8 Kimball....   --Shirley   At 17:04 02/20/98 -0600, you wrote: >Here I am again. I appreciate the attention my remarks are receiving. >[re: comments about movies & music] >Most of you will remember "Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea" and >Bach amongst the seaweed. A movie palace was to be divided into a two >screen venue and the organ was to be removed. I took my choirs to the >theatre and had them escorted into a pitch black space. >When all were seated.I began playing the Toccata & Fugue [d-minor of >course]. >As slowly I rose from the pit [console included] , the lights were >turned on slowly until the theatre shown in all it's >glory. It was a sad moment when I pushed the down button for the last >time. The kids in the choir thanked me for playing "CAPTAIN NEMO'S >SONG'. I still get goosebumps when I think about the experience. The >organ was a 3/m Kimball. > >Dick    
(back) Subject: Re: Organs Continued From: Roger Pariseau <grinder@west.net> Date: Fri, 20 Feb 1998 16:19:05 -0800   FireAlarmz@aol.com wrote:   > THEN: why are conservatories and music schools *crowded* with piano students, > and why are the same *hurting* for organ students, including your alma mater, > which dropped its church organ program? Even Curtis Institute has, I am told, > THREE organ majors! Or maybe it's four... > > **I** can't figure it! Anybody got any ideas?!   Because the organ has fallen into public "disrepute." The only time one hears organ music (other than church) is as a background to ominous scenes/events. Organists help this along by playing ancient music in the most academic and uninspiring method possible or by playing atonal, theme-less, ear-crunching "modern" "serious" music. "Pipe Dreams" doesn't help either!   Take heed from current popular music: the only way kids (and older folk) can find the beat anymore is with heavy assistance from thumping basses and heavy drumwork. Remember, the vast majority of our population's musical talent is limited to turning on their radios and CD players.   If we want to make the organ popular again, then we must play what our audiences want to hear. Should you have musically-naive guests in your home, play popular songs or show tunes. Jam it up! Make it bounce! If they really want to hear the "straight" stuff, they'll ask for it.   IMNSHO, putting some life and interpretation into the classical/religious/serious stuff wouldn't hurt either.....   -- Roger  
(back) Subject: Re: Organ {Dead or Alive} From: floww@webtv.net (Richard Wolf) Date: Fri, 20 Feb 1998 18:32:21 -0600   I have no bad feelings about blaming the schools for the deplorable lack of interest and knowledge of music. As an ex teacher and principal I saw music taking a back seat to football, basketball,etc. Some school districts deleted music totally. My school days were richly filled with everything from a 4th grad class singing Mendelssohn's " On Wings of Song" in complex harmony; junior high school class training for relative and perfect pitch; high school classes in harmony.professional symphony orchestra playing the greatest musical compositions, a marching band capable of a large range of diverse music, a large chorus,etc.,etc.. Many time all the groups played together making heavenly sounds and when the band marched, it was with great skill abd dignity, They didn't march 90 mph wiggling all the way. Now we're lucky to get "Eeensy Weensy Spider" on a kazoo. There are exceptions to these comments, but very rare to be found.  
(back) Subject: Re: Organ {Dead or Alive} From: floww@webtv.net (Richard Wolf) Date: Fri, 20 Feb 1998 18:36:42 -0600   Re: Which theatre?? It was the Alhambra theatre in MKE. It is now installed in the Oriental theatre .I don'i recall the no. of rks. I believe it is now a 3/28.  
(back) Subject: Re: Organ {Dead or Alive} From: floww@webtv.net (Richard Wolf) Date: Fri, 20 Feb 1998 18:52:19 -0600   My old high school pipe organ lies dead and dormant. I tried to get "my beloved Moller" but ran into politics of liabilities in removing it, school property released to public, etc.. I cringe thinking of what is or going to happen to it.   Dick    
(back) Subject: Re: Organ-Dead or Alive - a looong reply From: "Judy A. Ollikkala" <71431.2534@compuserve.com> Date: Fri, 20 Feb 1998 20:00:04 -0500   Bravo to you, Jonanthan Orwig, for saying what I'm thinking. BTW, the Boston Symphony Hall pipe organ does get used with the symphony, it needs work but does play, this from James David Christie, Symphony organist.  
(back) Subject: Registration HELP From: Ruth Bird <theraven@istar.ca> Date: Fri, 20 Feb 1998 20:09:30 -0500     (I have tried to send this twice before, but I never received it back = through the group, so I do not think it went through, if it did sorry = for the re posts.) =09 Hi, I have 2 pieces of music that I need help with. Maybe someone = would be so very kind as to give me an opinion on registrations. One = is a trumpet voluntary type tune, the other soft cantata type of tune. = =09 I used to have a "regular" type of organ, and I would be very happy = for your help. =09 Thanks, Ruth =09 Baldwin Classic Series---Digital Church Organ =09 Greeat Swell Pedal =09 swell to great tremelo swell to pedal =09 tremelo clarion 4 great to pedal =09 trumpet 8 oboe regal 4 =09 mixture lV fagott bombarde 16 =09 quint 1 1/3 sharf lll octave 4 =09 super octave 2 flautino 2 bourdon 8 =09 roh flote 4 nazard 2 2/3 principal 8 =09 octave 4 gedeckt sub-bass 16 =09 geteckt 8 viole celeste =09 principal 8 viola 8 =09 montre 16 bourdon 8 =09 =09 voice varation =09 automatic pedal =09 =09 =09 =09 =09              
(back) Subject: To Bob Conway/Bread From: Ruth Bird <theraven@istar.ca> Date: Fri, 20 Feb 1998 20:21:41 -0500   Sorry to post to everyone, but I cannot get through to Bob's email. They keep being returned to me.   Hi, its Ruth. I just want to say thanks very much. The loaf came out looking and tasting great. Hope you had a good trip to To. Ruth    
(back) Subject: Re: Organs Continued From: Shirley <pnst@itw.com> Date: Fri, 20 Feb 1998 19:20:06     >Take heed from current popular music: the only way kids (and older folk) can >find the beat anymore is with heavy assistance from thumping basses and heavy >drumwork. Remember, the vast majority of our population's musical talent is >limited to turning on their radios and CD players.     I was in a school talent show in ninth grade. The organ was on loan from one of the English teachers. I played show tunes on the organ, even though it was a "straight" instrument (as opposed to a "curved" one:) ). Did my TO thang.   And I won first place in the classical division.......... <<sigh>>   I didn't argue. :)   The school district where I live is very strong in instrumental music. And it boasts a high level of education here, with standardized test results consistently higher at all levels than the national norm. Does music intellect and IQ go hand in hand? I'm thinking we're all more intelligent people than the average.... We don't settle for mediocrity....   --Shirley  
(back) Subject: Re: Organ {Dead or Alive} From: Shirley <pnst@itw.com> Date: Fri, 20 Feb 1998 20:24:42   At 18:36 02/20/98 -0600, you wrote: >Re: Which theatre?? > It was the Alhambra theatre in MKE. It is now installed in the Oriental >theatre .I don'i recall the no. of rks. I believe it is now a 3/28.   Please excuse the ignorance, but what's MKE? Tnx. And the Oriental..... in Chicago??    
(back) Subject: Re: Organ-Dead or Alive - a looong reply From: floww@webtv.net (Richard Wolf) Date: Fri, 20 Feb 1998 19:38:25 -0600   Re: Boston Symphony Hall Now I have an answer to my question about the organ. I requested info before but didn't receive the courtesy of an answer.   Dick  
(back) Subject: Re: Organ {Dead or Alive} From: danbel@earthlink.net Date: Fri, 20 Feb 1998 17:39:44 -0800 (PST)     >Please excuse the ignorance, but what's MKE? Tnx. And the Oriental..... >in Chicago??   Probably Milwaukee----MKE is the airline city code for Milwaukee--I think! :)   djb    
(back) Subject: Re: Organ {Dead or Alive} From: floww@webtv.net (Richard Wolf) Date: Fri, 20 Feb 1998 19:44:36 -0600   Re: what is???? Sorry, my old pilot training got in the way.MKE is Milwaukee, Wi. Both theatres are/ were there.   Dick  
(back) Subject: Re: Organs Continued From: Kevin Cartwright <kevin1@alaweb.com> Date: Fri, 20 Feb 1998 19:44:40 -0600   (Sort of in response to Shirley's mail) Whoever can figure out the strange thing about this message, well, good for you... Yes, I did it on purpose:   People walk into my house and see the Wurlitzer in the living room and asks "who plays?" They immediatly ask my mother and/or I to play 'something' when they find out. However, they have to pay..we always show them everything ELSE we have too. This includes several different harmonicas, a fife, thumbdrum, mouth or jaw harp (a.k.a. "Jew's Harp"), a clarinet, a trumpet, occasionally the ole' tuba, the bowed psaltry, the bag pipe chanter (pronounced like 'kanter'), I could go on for a while. Someday I hope to add an organ to this collection.   Anyway,   Kevin Cartwright kevin1@alaweb.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Organs Continued From: Kevin Cartwright <kevin1@alaweb.com> Date: Fri, 20 Feb 1998 19:46:19 -0600   FireAlarmz@aol.com wrote: > > Shirley-- if 1.your (Conn) organ gets a *lot* of attention > 2. your grand piano is virtually UNnoticed > > (both by "lay" people) > > THEN: why are conservatories and music schools *crowded* with piano students, > and why are the same *hurting* for organ students, including your alma mater, > which dropped its church organ program? Even Curtis Institute has, I am told, > THREE organ majors! Or maybe it's four... > > **I** can't figure it! Anybody got any ideas?! > > Scratching my head, Bill Miller, FPC Trenton NJ   Maybe they are just meant to be organists anyway, they just don't know it yet...  
(back) Subject: Re: Organ {Dead or Alive} From: floww@webtv.net (Richard Wolf) Date: Fri, 20 Feb 1998 20:02:22 -0600   Shirley, I checked tie ATOS listing on the Kimball. It is a 3/38.     Dick  
(back) Subject: Re: Organ {Dead or Alive} From: Kevin Cartwright <kevin1@alaweb.com> Date: Fri, 20 Feb 1998 20:14:53 -0600   GHamil9709@aol.com wrote: > > In a message dated 98-02-20 11:36:06 EST, you write: > > << The "State of the Organ" is tenuous. > Churches are going to keyboards played by pianists. >> > > It's true!   Not entirely. Our church recieved a new keyboard well worth over $8,000 from an unknown donor (didn't want to have to spell anonymous). Well, it sits wedged between the grand piano and the choir loft with its cover collecting the small amount of dust in the sanctuary. We use it every now and then on a Sunday night and we use it for the "Raising of the Cross" ceremony instead of the piano at Easter because the cross, in its "down" state, covers the organ console, and the organist would be forced to play in a hunched or slouched position. We use the keyboard because its amplifier can become loud enough to support congregational singing.   Maybe our church is just an exception.   Kevin C. kevin1@alaweb.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Organ {Dead or Alive} From: Kevin Cartwright <kevin1@alaweb.com> Date: Fri, 20 Feb 1998 20:16:41 -0600   I was told the BBC tries to use music recorded from the organ shown if at all possible. Is this true?   Jim Zimmerman wrote: > > At 10:23 AM 2/20/98 -0600, Richard Wolf wrote: > >The "State of the Organ" is tenuous. > <snip> > > >A teenage friend of mine thought organs were for GEEKS untill > >he sat down and played > > > > Richard's last sentence answers part of the question. How do we expose the > organ for the wonderful instrument that it is? When watching a wedding or > any "church" scene on television, how often do you hear a REAL organ? Far > more often than not, the "organ" heard is a recording of some hideous > sounding electronic thing. If this is what the general public perceives as > an organ, no wonder people think organs are for geeks. Please don't think > I'm slamming electronic organs. I own one and practice on it every day. > However, there are so many fantastic pipe organ recordings that a TV studio > need not stoop to using the awful organ recordings they use. > > ** Jim Zimmerman zimmerman@chem.purdue.edu **  
(back) Subject: Re: Organ {Dead or Alive} From: Shirley <pnst@itw.com> Date: Fri, 20 Feb 1998 21:11:42   At 20:02 02/20/98 -0600, you wrote: >Shirley, I checked tie ATOS listing on the Kimball. It is a 3/38. > > >Dick     Sorry.... I guess I wasn't clear in my posting. I have a special place in my heart for the 3/8 Kimball in the Lansdowne Theatre (theatre still stands, second-floor offices are rented, but nothing in the theatre, organ removed long ago) where I "cut my teeth" so to speak.   Also the former Boyd Theatre organ (downtown Philly), now enlarged and healthy in the Dickinson High School (outside of Wilmington.... closer to Newark.... Delaware) is a Kimball. Yeah, sure, everybody else in the world has a love affair with Wurlitzer.... not me. :) Ya just can't beat the orchestral abilities of a Kimball.... not with those to-die-for strings! :)   So whenever I hear about a healthy Kimball, I perk up. :)   --Shirley      
(back) Subject: Re: Organ {Dead or Alive} From: Kevin Cartwright <kevin1@alaweb.com> Date: Fri, 20 Feb 1998 20:31:52 -0600   Richard Wolf wrote: > > I have no bad feelings about blaming the schools for the deplorable lack > of interest and knowledge of music. As an ex teacher and principal I saw > music taking a back seat to football, basketball,etc. Some school > districts deleted music totally. My school days were richly filled with > everything from a 4th grad class singing > Mendelssohn's " On Wings of Song" in complex harmony; junior high school > class training for relative and perfect pitch; high school classes in > harmony.professional symphony orchestra playing the greatest > musical compositions, a marching band > capable of a large range of diverse music, a large chorus,etc.,etc.. > Many time all the groups played together making heavenly sounds and when > the band marched, it was with great skill abd dignity, They didn't march > 90 mph wiggling all the way. > Now we're lucky to get "Eeensy Weensy Spider" on a kazoo. There are > exceptions to these comments, but very rare to be found.   Our school's band is a nice, large, good one, and we have a wonderful choral and drama program. But, it is hell to pay if a musical teacher even thinks about asking the board of ed. for a small amount. Several other "fluff" activities are put behind the "important" thinks like football, basketball, baseball, GOLF, etc... I am in a scholar's bowl group that has a current debt of $1,000. The coordinator asked the school for the money as usual, and they refused it (and several other travel requests after that) and we were told to absolve the debt or absolve the group. Doesn't it seem funny that ONE football player takes more then $1,500 just to suit up? I can't even dream of getting a pipe organ (or a cheap electric) installed in the new school (to be opened in '00). We had to put a lock on the grand piano in the bandroom because of disrespect and damage.   Anyway, I want to move to a better, less corrupt town.   Kevin C. kevin1@alaweb.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Organ-Dead or Alive From: Otto Pebworth <opebwrth@gte.net> Date: Fri, 20 Feb 1998 21:40:03 -0500   The organ - dead... I dunno about that at my parish...   We have a Rodgers (2 yrs old), a tracker of unknown origin (and in pretty poor condition), and then my keyboard. At any given Sunday service, the Rodgers and the keyboard will be used; and there has been one occasion of recent that the tracker was used to accompany a soloist. I guess a lot of use/disuse depends on how flexible the musicians are, as well as the pastoral staff...   Otto  
(back) Subject: Re: Organ-Dead or Alive From: SCoonrod@aol.com Date: Fri, 20 Feb 1998 21:47:19 EST   In a message dated 98-02-20 13:25:29 EST, pniki@firstavenue.com writes:   <<You don't think it has anything to do with organbuilders building French horn and cor anglais stops instead of ranketts and quarter-length squawks, do you?>>   Actually, this may very well be the case, IMO. Oh to be so lucky as to have the big 4 man. (early) Aeolian-Skinner in the chancel and a historical copy Silbermann in the Gallery!   Anyway, I think the rich, english style instruments with abundant strings and warm color stops do tend to please the average person (not to mention ME!) more than Krumm-regals do, even though these type stops should not be ex- communicated, either!   RandyT