PipeChat Digest #270 - Tuesday, February 24, 1998
 
Crying at good music (Was: JUST BE GLAD YOU CAN PLAY, DARN IT!!!)
  by Chong Ten Yeen <art60378@leonis.nus.edu.sg>
Re: British Ceremonial Music
  by Ron Hemmel <ohemmel@mail.eclipse.net>
Re: Crying at good music :-)
  by <SCoonrod@aol.com>
Re: Crying at good music (Was: JUST BE GLAD YOU CAN PLAY, DARN	IT!!!)
  by bruce cornely <cremona84000@webtv.net>
Re: Crying at good music (Was: JUST BE GLAD YOU CAN PLAY, DARN	IT!!!)
  by Richard Wolf <floww@webtv.net>
Re: Calvary Episcopal Church, Pittsburgh (specs/history)
  by <GRSCoLVR@aol.com>
Re: Calvary Episcopal Church, Pittsburgh (specs/history)
  by Stanley E Yoder <syoder+@andrew.cmu.edu>
An organist once again
  by Jonathan M Orwig <giwro@juno.com>
Re: Calvary Episcopal Church, Pittsburgh (specs/history)
  by <ScottFop@aol.com>
Re: Calvary Episcopal Church, Pittsburgh (specs/history)
  by <ScottFop@aol.com>
Re: Organ (Dead or Alive?)
  by Vernon Moeller <vernonm@ccsi.com>
Tears at church music
  by Judy A. Ollikkala <71431.2534@compuserve.com>
Re: Tears at church music
  by Gordon Lucas & Larry McGuire <stops@globalnet.co.uk>
Re: Organs on Computerized Reference Programs
  by Gordon Lucas & Larry McGuire <stops@globalnet.co.uk>
Re: Organs on Computerized Reference Programs
  by Stanley Lowkis <nstarfil@mediaone.net>
Re: Crying at good music (Was: JUST BE GLAD YOU CAN PLAY, DARN	IT!!!)
  by bruce cornely <cremona84000@webtv.net>
Re: Organs on Computerized Reference Programs
  by Jon C. Habermaas <opus1100@ameritech.net>
Re: An organist once again
  by bruce cornely <cremona84000@webtv.net>
Re: British Ceremonial Music
  by Ron Hemmel <ohemmel@mail.eclipse.net>
Re: Organs on Computerized Reference Programs
  by Stanley Lowkis <nstarfil@mediaone.net>
Re: Calvary Episcopal Church, Pittsburgh (specs/history)
  by Ken <mewzishn@spec.net>
Feelings of Inadequacy (Was Re: Crying at good music)
  by Shirley <pnst@itw.com>
Re: Crying at good music :-)
  by Otto Pebworth <opebwrth@gte.net>
Re: Organ (Dead or Alive?)
  by Glenda <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com>
Re: Funny hymn references
  by Stan Guy <Texstan@ix.netcom.com>
Re: Organ (Dead or Alive?)
  by Vox Celeste <voxceleste@mailexcite.com>
 


(back) Subject: Crying at good music (Was: JUST BE GLAD YOU CAN PLAY, DARN IT!!!) From: Chong Ten Yeen <art60378@leonis.nus.edu.sg> Date: Tue, 24 Feb 1998 19:30:44 +0800 (SST)   On Sat, 21 Feb 1998, bombarde8@juno.com wrote:   > I've been known to cry during a service during the prelude because it was > SO beautiful <snip>   I've found myself near tears(quite a few times, too) when I heard *such* lovely music, *so* lovingly played, because: 1) of its sublime beauty 2) I knew I would never be able to play like that, no matter how much I yearn for such beautiful music   How's that for frustration and envy! I've recently listened to rather inspiring instances of hymn-playing/ postludes/ preludes, and these experiences have left me feeling quite guilty and frustrated, having suddenly realised how mediocre my mudding-along (ie, hymn-playing and the like) actually is and how much of good playing I've missed :(   Ten Yeen   BTW, has anybody ever felt like this, or am I the only over-sensitive/ neurotic one!     --* I'd rather be a failure at something I love *-- than be a success at something I hate. -George Burns-      
(back) Subject: Re: British Ceremonial Music From: Ron Hemmel <ohemmel@mail.eclipse.net> Date: Tue, 24 Feb 1998 07:34:33 -0500 (EST)   Kevin M. Simons asked for the above.   I would recommend the Processional by Harris. I believe it's in the second volume of wedding music published by Oxford (but, of course, it's at the chapel now and I'm at home!). The piece was written for the Queen's procession at the wedding of H.R.H. Princess Margaret in 1960. If you have a glorious instrument and favorable acoustics it's a wonderful work. I have found it to be less satisfying in smaller spaces. It's also not terribly difficult to play. Enjoy!   Ron Hemmel Assistant University Organist Princeton University (4/135 Skinner/Mander)      
(back) Subject: Re: Crying at good music :-) From: SCoonrod@aol.com Date: Tue, 24 Feb 1998 07:36:47 EST   << On Sat, 21 Feb 1998, bombarde8@juno.com wrote: > I've been known to cry during a service during the prelude because it was > SO beautiful <snip> >>   I find myself most moved by lovely choral singing. I remember hearing Vaughan Williams' "The Blessed Son of God" for the first time and the way I literally overflowed with emotion. This was also the first time I had ever heard "real" choral singing.   Two organ pieces come to mind also: I remember crying at my only (live) hearing of "My Soul Doth Magnify the Lord" from Dupre's Antiphons for Organ, and strangely enough at Paul Manz's organ arrangement of "What Is This Lovely Fragrance" from his Chorale Improvisations. I can only pray these melodies have the same effects on others!   RandyT  
(back) Subject: Re: Crying at good music (Was: JUST BE GLAD YOU CAN PLAY, DARN IT!!!) From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Tue, 24 Feb 1998 08:33:46 -0500   Nope, you're not alone. I don't think I've ever made it through "How Lovely" (Brahms Requiem) without the need for "wipers" and a discreet sniff or two. Very often at OHS conventions I have to just stand there and listen to several stanzas of a favorite hymn, partially because they are so special and also because I miss singing them regularly now. The National Anthem is another one, and Dixie (wow, talk about ambiguity ... a SNObound southerner). Just keep a hankey handy. One thing I have learned is that paper tissue does not do the work.   bruce cornely o o o __________ o o o ago (dean) ohs o o __________ o o  
(back) Subject: Re: Crying at good music (Was: JUST BE GLAD YOU CAN PLAY, DARN IT!!!) From: floww@webtv.net (Richard Wolf) Date: Tue, 24 Feb 1998 07:59:19 -0600   I recall one occasion when I visited St. Patricks Cathedral in NYC. A boy soprano was singing "Panis Angelicus" and the tears were ankle deep.           Dick  
(back) Subject: Re: Calvary Episcopal Church, Pittsburgh (specs/history) From: GRSCoLVR@aol.com Date: Tue, 24 Feb 1998 10:48:19 EST   Interesting History Scott,,,,,,I am interested to know who the builder was and who did the revision work,,,perhaps this was covered in an earlier posting, and I missed it... Thanks in advance!   Roc  
(back) Subject: Re: Calvary Episcopal Church, Pittsburgh (specs/history) From: Stanley E Yoder <syoder+@andrew.cmu.edu> Date: Tue, 24 Feb 1998 11:05:00 -0500 (EST)   Hello. I'm not Scott, but Calvary was a Larry Phelps Casavant, 1962, i.e., a Phelpsavant. Casavant, minus Phelps this time, did the re-do in '90. New, multiplexed console that can be moved out in front of the screen for recitals. Reeds especially were revoiced, and a new front party horn to wake the dead added (already a chamade battery in the west gallery.) Electronic 32' flues also added. This is the premiere concert instrument (leviathan-size) in the city. The AGO chapter uses it for an annual Organ Artists Series (two Fall, two Spring). The 50s Beckarath in St. Paul's RC cath. is wonderful, but cannot be used for recitals.   Hope this helps, Stan Yoder Pittsburgh  
(back) Subject: An organist once again From: giwro@juno.com (Jonathan M Orwig) Date: Tue, 24 Feb 1998 08:10:31 -0800   Dear pipechatters -   It seems I am once more to take up the duties of organist - Yippee! My organist has decided to retire, and I will probably take over the service playing now. I will still need to get an accompanist for the choir (I strongly dislike conducting and playing at the same time, although I have done it before for 2 years).   Strangely enough, this also falls at the same time I have decided to take up organ lessons again... you may remember my posts over the last couple of weeks regarding the concert I attended at Claremont UCC (Glatter Götz III/78) - I will be taking lessons from the church organist, Dr. Carey Robertson, who also teaches across the street at Claremont Graduate School. Her desire (and that of the church) is to use this new instrument for the community as well as the church, so that is where I will be taking lessons!!! I must admit to being a little nervous - I haven't had regular formal lessons in almost 15 YEARS! Sheesh, what a lot of bad habits to unlearn ;-) Not only that, but I have never played regularly on a tracker, and I seem to remember they are not very forgiving! Oh well, it should be a challenge, and something to encourage me to improve...     **************** Jonathan Orwig Bethany Church, Redlands, CA Evensong Music, Media and Graphics - Organ, Keyboard & Choral Music http://members.aol.com/Evnsong/pgone.html   _____________________________________________________________________ You don't need to buy Internet access to use free Internet e-mail. Get completely free e-mail from Juno at http://www.juno.com Or call Juno at (800) 654-JUNO [654-5866]    
(back) Subject: Re: Calvary Episcopal Church, Pittsburgh (specs/history) From: ScottFop@aol.com Date: Tue, 24 Feb 1998 11:32:21 EST   In a message dated 98-02-24 10:36:28 EST, you write:   << Thank you for this wonderful information. Do you realize, however, that you went through the whole thing without saying who the builder was (the Phelps reference implies that it was Casavant, but that's my only clue) or who did the rebuild (Casavant, too, perhaps?)? >>   Uh, yes- I guess I DID forget that ONE little detail:   Casavant-Freres, Ltee. Built the original organ and did the rebuild/restoration in 1991  
(back) Subject: Re: Calvary Episcopal Church, Pittsburgh (specs/history) From: ScottFop@aol.com Date: Tue, 24 Feb 1998 11:35:32 EST   In a message dated 98-02-24 11:10:16 EST, you write:   << This is the premiere concert instrument (leviathan-size) in the city. The AGO chapter uses it for an annual Organ Artists Series (two Fall, two Spring).   Well, I wouldn't exactly discount East liberty Presbyterian and it's monster Skinner (where I am doing a recital on May 17). It has all the goodies as well but is in a totally different acoustic. Then, of course- there IS the Carnegie- but who knows if any of us will ever hear that poor organ play again........ =*o(     The 50s Beckarath in St. Paul's RC cath. is wonderful, but cannot be used for recitals.   I wonder why not? (besides the fact that it is THIN and UNINSPIRING)......    
(back) Subject: Re: Organ (Dead or Alive?) From: Vernon Moeller <vernonm@ccsi.com> Date: Tue, 24 Feb 1998 10:36:04 -0600   Howdy, Y'All!   >Vernon Moeller, was it you that offered Organ 101 to your congregation >every so often? How effective was the series? > > --Shirley >   Who? Me? Yeah, I'm a few days behind in my email reading....   Well, in response to your questions, I must say nobody who saw one of my Occasional Organ 101 presentations ever came up to me sobbing afterwards, saying, "Thank God for your presentation! Now I know where I've gone wrong, and I'll give up my healthy law practice to become a fulltime organist..."   Really, it was more like this, where I'd bump into somebody in the grocery store and hear, "Well, wouldja lookahere, John Bob? Hit's our organist, that funny guy whut stands up front a-jabber-jawin' about stops and peddles and sich stuff. He's got our SusyMay all in a lather about wantin' to take up organ-playin' jest as soon as she gradjeates from middle school. Don't that jest beat all?" ... or something like that (sigh!).   Actually, more people recognize me and chat with me about the musicians in their families and how they want to know if young Hubert is too young to play the organ and that sort of thing, so "success" is actually rather difficult to measure. I do get a lot of compliments on what I did, and sometimes from unexpected sources: I remember leaving church one Sunday morning and as I was walking to my car, a guy approached me with a youngster in tow - he was dressed like somebody who worked outdoors, like a modern cowboy, minus the dust. His little boy was a carbon copy, and both of them were scrubbed clean as a whistle. He told me that he didn't always understand a lot about church music, but that I was able to bring the music "down" to him so he and his son got more out of it. Then he turned to his boy and said, "Isn't that right, Todd?" and I saw the little fellow's great big smile and his nodding hat. Sure made my day.   I wrote a fairly extensive article about the whole OO101 experience and submitted it to The American Organist for possible publication, but it was rejected on the grounds that it was too much a matter of opinion, and that they felt that it might be published if it was condensed and presented as one or two letters. One of these days, I'll polish it up a little and put some disclaimers in it like, "This worked for me, but it might not work for you because..." and run it through their gauntlet once more.   Briefly (as briefly as I can, seein's how I'm somewhat long-winded), what happened was this: the church purchased a new Allen MDS-60, a really fine digital instrument with MIDI, sequencer, custom cabinets, the whole 9 yards. The minister at that time (he's since retired), who was really fonder of Contemporary Christian Music than Traditional CM, asked if I'd get up in front of the congregation a few times and talk about the organ, how it was organized, how it worked, etc. So I did, spending a couple of minutes at occasional offertories talking about one or two ideas associated with organs, and then playing a brief musical example. I was really putting in preparation time on it, practicing my speech over and over while I commuted to and from work each day. People were really getting into it, coming up to the organ while I played the postlude, putting their kids up on the organ bench so they could play a few notes (with me hovering around making sure they didn't fall off or twist off the stopknob), asking about organ and piano lessons, etc. Then the minister called me in and said that OO101 had just about run its course and that some folks thought it was too entertaining and not religious enough and maybe I should just have one class per year, on a Saturday morning, for those interested enough to attend. Long silence. I could feel my blood pressure going up - then I had an idea. "OK," I said, "how about this? Can I just take up a little space in the church newsletter instead, with an occasional column? I can cover the same ideas and if I time it just right, the newsletter containing my article will reach the congregation the day before I play music illustrating what I said in my chat, and who knows, maybe some folks will have yet another reason to attend church the next day? Whaddyathink?" He thought for a moment, then smiled and said, "OK."   So that's where it stands today. I've been encouraged to revive the original 'class' at offertory now and then, especially since we have a new minister, but my time is limited and I write better than I speak, so I imagine OO101 will stay where it is for now.   Here is an example of my last article:   "Back in the Dark Ages, when I was living in Denver, my 4th grade teacher explained to us that the difference between major and minor keys in music was that major is always happy and minor is always sad. In so doing, she was following the tradition of countless other elementary school teachers who didn't want to get into the confusing details of a complex subject and therefore, just simplified it to answer their students' basic questions.   Ever notice how something you were told as a child comes back to haunt you years and years later? I think a lot of folks still think of major as happy and minor as sad, and that if they sing hymns in church, this belief affects how they may feel about certain hymns. We all tend to like the major-key hymns because they are joyful ("Joyful, Joyful We Adore Thee") or at least reassuring ("I Need Thee Every Hour"), and yet there are other hymns that are minor that are pretty, too, so how do we feel about them? "We Three Kings" is a good example; its minor key tends to give it an air of mystery, not one of sadness.   I would like to suggest that while the happy/sad argument may work for small children, that somewhere along the line, as we grow musically, we should try to rework that definition a bit. In my mind, the minor keys offer more color and more passion than the major keys. My musical example (to be played on Sunday, January 25 as my prelude) illustrates just that point. It is the "Fantasia on the Hymn Tune Ton-Y-Botel" by Richard Purvis. This hymn tune is also known as Ebenezer and it is used for hymns number 586 and 108 in our hymnal. Neither hymn is sad - I think that a minor key was used for them to provide a sense of musical strength which supports the words. Purvis' arrangement exploits the strength of this hymn tune's minor melody by presenting parts of it in a starkly contrasted major key. We are thus able to better appreciate the joyful parts of this piece regardless of their major or minor tonality." (365 words)   I'll be glad to present my article here on PipeChat, if y'all want to read it. I'll find it and do a word count on it first, and ask Pete if it needs to be split up into 2 or 3 articles. *Or* I can send it in one piece to those of you who want a copy, just lemme know.   Sorry to rattle on so, but it's Shirley's fault! She woke me up! ;-)   \/\/\      
(back) Subject: Tears at church music From: "Judy A. Ollikkala" <71431.2534@compuserve.com> Date: Tue, 24 Feb 1998 12:13:38 -0500   The two hymns that "get to me" every time are:   Irby "Once in Royal David's City" the verse that starts and ends "And our eyes at last shall see him----and he leads his children on----to the place where he has gone"   Thaxted (taken from Holst "The Planets--Jupiter") "O God, Beyond All Praising" can be found in Worship III  
(back) Subject: Re: Tears at church music From: Gordon Lucas & Larry McGuire <stops@globalnet.co.uk> Date: Tue, 24 Feb 1998 18:57:58 GMT   :-((( whilst never having been moved to tears by GOOD music......   I have many times been moved to tears by BAD <g>.....   Shivers will run up and down my spine though, and tingle the nerves, when I hear a single boy's pure (untremulated) soprano during choral evensong in almost any English cathedral, who's voice floats in an ethereal way above the softest of swell salicionals (box closed) and pedal 32' open wood (only) rumbling away........   On the other hand, it could from the draught and rumble caused by a passing truck.......:-))   Larry    
(back) Subject: Re: Organs on Computerized Reference Programs From: Gordon Lucas & Larry McGuire <stops@globalnet.co.uk> Date: Tue, 24 Feb 1998 18:58:01 GMT   At 03:55 AM 2/24/98 -0500, Dr Edward Peterson wrote:   >> [...] The ..... tells about the Allen Organ Company as the inventor of the Electronic Organ. > >Interesting 'revision of history' .........Dr.Ed > > I continually find it not only amazing, but incredible, that widely known and established historical FACTS can become distorted and / or totally overturned in modern writings.   Unfortunately, this doesn't necessarily apply just to the history of the organ or its music.   Why don't the authors just shift the typewriter keys one to the left or right when writing these "authoritive or expert version's" so that eveyone can see they are a load of 'yesff;r' (he he he hee..)   (one to the right!!)   IMHO ;-)> -- Misinformation is more damaging than no information.   Larry ( still hohh;omh)    
(back) Subject: Re: Organs on Computerized Reference Programs From: Stanley Lowkis <nstarfil@mediaone.net> Date: Tue, 24 Feb 1998 14:45:51 -0500   Gordon Lucas & Larry McGuire wrote: > > At 03:55 AM 2/24/98 -0500, Dr Edward Peterson wrote: > > >> [...] The ..... tells about the Allen Organ Company as the inventor of > the Electronic Organ. > > > >Interesting 'revision of history' .........Dr.Ed > > > > > I continually find it not only amazing, but incredible, that widely known > and established historical FACTS can become distorted and / or totally > overturned in modern writings. > > Unfortunately, this doesn't necessarily apply just to the history of the > organ or its music. > > Why don't the authors just shift the typewriter keys one to the left or > right when writing these "authoritive or expert version's" so that eveyone > can see they are a load of 'yesff;r' (he he he hee..) > > (one to the right!!) > > IMHO ;-)> -- Misinformation is more damaging than no information. > > Larry ( still hohh;omh)           ANOTHER CIPHER POST!  
(back) Subject: Re: Crying at good music (Was: JUST BE GLAD YOU CAN PLAY, DARN IT!!!) From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Tue, 24 Feb 1998 15:00:03 -0500   Panis Angelicus at St Patricks   Gee, Dick! I got a lump in my throat just reading your post! whew   bruce cornely o o o __________ o o o ago (dean) ohs o o __________ o o  
(back) Subject: Re: Organs on Computerized Reference Programs From: "Jon C. Habermaas" <opus1100@ameritech.net> Date: Tue, 24 Feb 1998 14:07:18 -0600   Stanley Lowkis wrote:   > ANOTHER CIPHER POST! > >What is a cipher post...not a cypher post?  
(back) Subject: Re: An organist once again From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Tue, 24 Feb 1998 15:10:10 -0500   Jonathan, May I offer an alternative for you regarding hiring an accompanist for anthems. Whenever I have a difficult accompaniment that is one of the one's that I really want to play, so I get someone to direct. I have already taught the choir how I want them to sing the piece, they know the nuances, etc, and really all they need is someone to keep them together, and often you can find someone in the choir who can direct and sing, not to mention you save money and your sub-director doesn't run out substituting, plus is available on festivals.   bruce cornely o o o __________ o o o ago (dean) ohs o o __________ o o  
(back) Subject: Re: British Ceremonial Music From: Ron Hemmel <ohemmel@mail.eclipse.net> Date: Tue, 24 Feb 1998 15:44:52 -0500 (EST)   Ooops!   The Harris Processional March is in "A Wedding Bouquet" published by Novello.   -Ron   >Kevin M. Simons asked for the above. > > I would recommend the Processional by Harris. I believe it's in >the second volume of wedding music published by Oxford (but, of course, >it's at the chapel now and I'm at home!). > The piece was written for the Queen's procession at the wedding of >H.R.H. Princess Margaret in 1960. If you have a glorious instrument and >favorable acoustics it's a wonderful work. I have found it to be less >satisfying in smaller spaces. It's also not terribly difficult to play. > Enjoy! > >Ron Hemmel >Assistant University Organist >Princeton University >(4/135 Skinner/Mander) > > > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org        
(back) Subject: Re: Organs on Computerized Reference Programs From: Stanley Lowkis <nstarfil@mediaone.net> Date: Tue, 24 Feb 1998 15:49:47 -0500   cipher : cypher :: theater : theatre         Jon C. Habermaas wrote: > > Stanley Lowkis wrote: > > > ANOTHER CIPHER POST! > > > >What is a cipher post...not a cypher post?  
(back) Subject: Re: Calvary Episcopal Church, Pittsburgh (specs/history) From: Ken <mewzishn@spec.net> Date: Tue, 24 Feb 1998 16:04:00 +0000   Stanley E Yoder wrote:   > This is the premiere concert instrument (leviathan-size) in the > city. The AGO chapter uses it for an annual Organ Artists Series (two > Fall, two Spring). The 50s Beckarath in St. Paul's RC cath. is > wonderful, but cannot be used for recitals.   What about the big Crashavant at the Prespedestrian church? And why's the Beckerath unavailable for concerts?   Ken Sybesma        
(back) Subject: Feelings of Inadequacy (Was Re: Crying at good music) From: Shirley <pnst@itw.com> Date: Tue, 24 Feb 1998 16:05:06   At 19:30 02/24/98 +0800, Ten Yeen wrote: >I've recently listened to rather >inspiring instances of hymn-playing/ postludes/ preludes, and these >experiences have left me feeling quite guilty and frustrated, having >suddenly realised how mediocre my mudding-along (ie, hymn-playing and the >like) actually is and how much of good playing I've missed :( > >Ten Yeen > >BTW, has anybody ever felt like this, or am I the only over-sensitive/ >neurotic one! >     Been there, done that.... fairly recently, too, as a matter of fact.... Taking stock is always difficult to face, but necessary for growth. OK, you've acknowledged it. Now move beyond it. Either accept your playing the way it is, or go take lessons, or change teachers, or take some college music theory courses, or something.... take steps to move past this point.   --Shirley  
(back) Subject: Re: Crying at good music :-) From: Otto Pebworth <opebwrth@gte.net> Date: Tue, 24 Feb 1998 17:51:41 -0500   > << On Sat, 21 Feb 1998, bombarde8@juno.com wrote: > > > I've been known to cry during a service during the prelude because it was > > SO beautiful <snip>     ---> Two Sundays ago, I played the Greig "Romanza" for the Offertory - I understand that there was one person in the congregation gently weeping during the piece...  
(back) Subject: Re: Organ (Dead or Alive?) From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com> Date: Tue, 24 Feb 1998 06:12:52 -0800   Vernon, what an interesting article! I wish you could teach my congregation! I for one would enjoy seeing your others.   Glenda Sutton      
(back) Subject: Re: Funny hymn references From: Stan Guy <Texstan@ix.netcom.com> Date: Tue, 24 Feb 1998 20:39:48 -0600   Kevin ----   The hymn is "Come, Thou Fount of Every Blessing"Kevin M. Simons wrote:   > Howdy List, > > Talking about the hymn "I Sing a song.." and the name of the author, > it > reminded me of another funny thing that happened a few years ago when > I > was singing in a choir. > > We were singing the opening hymn, I can't remember the name of it now, > > but in the text somewhere was the phrase "Now I raise my Ebeneezer". > During the sermon (which was particularly bad that morning) a friend > of > mine passed around a kind of David Letterman top Ten list. Top Ten > Ways > to Raise your Ebeneezer! Someof them were "Use a bicycle tire air > pump". > > Anybody remember the name of the hymn? We used to sing it all the > time, > but I haven't done it in awhile. > > Kevin M. Simons > Organist, St. Thomas More Catholic Church > Norman, Oklahoma > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org        
(back) Subject: Re: Organ (Dead or Alive?) From: "Vox Celeste" <voxceleste@mailexcite.com> Date: Tue, 24 Feb 1998 19:02:25 -0700   On Tue, 24 Feb 1998 "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com> wrote:   >Vernon, what an interesting article! I wish you could teach my congregation! >I for one would enjoy seeing your others. >^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ > >Glenda Sutton       OOooo-eeee!   How this stirs an old bird's imagination!   Vox ("Show us your others") Celeste       Free web-based email, Forever, From anywhere! http://www.mailexcite.com