PipeChat Digest #187 - Monday, January 5, 1998
 
Re: Mozart K. 594
  by Vincent lefèvre <vlefevere@unicall.be>
Re: Digital Organs: live pipes headed for extinction?
  by JAMES H HAILEY <BALD1@prodigy.net>
Howard Goodall's Organ Works (Australia)
  by Mark Quarmby <markq@mail.flex.com.au>
Much happier
  by JILLIAN SCHULTHEIS <organgeek@geocities.com>
Re: VT Recital
  by Paul Opel <popel@sover.net>
Re: Howard Goodall's Organ Works (Australia)
  by Vincent lefèvre <vlefevere@unicall.be>
Re: Digital Organs: live pipes headed for extinction?
  by CDKrug <CDKrug@aol.com>
Tracker with a glass case?
  by CDKrug <CDKrug@aol.com>
Re: Tracker with a glass case?
  by Bob Loesch <rrloesch@jps.net>
RE: Tracker with a glass case?
  by David J Neal <david@neal.u-net.com>
Re: Tracker with a glass case?
  by Ben Baldus <bbaldus@voyager.net>
Re: Digital Organs: live pipes headed for extinction?
  by NFexec <NFexec@aol.com>
The Phantom Organ
  by Kevin Cartwright <kevin1@alaweb.com>
Re: Tracker with a glass case?
  by Giwro <Giwro@aol.com>
Re: Tracker with a glass case?
  by Ken <mewzishn@spec.net>
Re: Howard Goodall
  by Mark Quarmby <markq@mail.flex.com.au>
Re: Tracker with a glass case?
  by Ken <mewzishn@spec.net>
Re: The Phantom Organ
  by Bob Loesch <rrloesch@jps.net>
Re: Tracker with a glass case?
  by RMaryman <RMaryman@aol.com>
Home Pipe Organ Installation
  by robert.cowley <robert.cowley@MCI2000.com>
Re: The Phantom Organ
  by RMaryman <RMaryman@aol.com>
Re: VT Recital
  by bruce cornely <cremona84000@webtv.net>
Re: Home Pipe Organ Installation
  by Schwebung <Schwebung@aol.com>
Re: Digital Organs: live pipes headed for extinction?
  by bruce cornely <cremona84000@webtv.net>
Re: Digital Organs: live pipes headed for extinction?
  by ScottFop <ScottFop@aol.com>
Re: Digital Organs: live pipes headed for extinction?
  by Douglas A. Campbell <dougcampbell@juno.com>
 


(back) Subject: Re: Mozart K. 594 From: " Vincent lefèvre" <vlefevere@unicall.be> Date: Sun, 04 Jan 1998 11:41:49 +0100     --------------CDAFC8E1AC957373F487A6A9 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1 Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable X-MIME-Autoconverted: from 8bit to quoted-printable by relay.unicall.be id LAA01953       Kurt Kehler wrote:   > Dear List, > > Does anyone have a recording of Mozart's Fantasie in > F Minor, K. 594? If so, could you email me the timing > of this piece? >   Kurt, Jean Guillou plays Mozart's Fantasie on the Great Organ of the Saint Ustache Church in Paris. His timing is 9'56". This album is an inaugural recording made by Dorian Recordings (DOR-90134) with a remarkable degree of sound quality (DDD). I hope having helped you! Greetings Vincent Lef=E8vre, secretary of the non-profit assoc. "Organs in Flanders= " vlefevere@unicall.be   --------------CDAFC8E1AC957373F487A6A9 Content-Type: text/html; charset=us-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML> &nbsp;   <P>Kurt Kehler wrote: <BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=CITE>Dear List,   <P>Does anyone have a recording of Mozart's Fantasie in <BR>F Minor, K. 594? If so, could you email me the timing <BR>of this piece? <BR>&nbsp;</BLOCKQUOTE> Kurt, <BR>Jean Guillou plays Mozart's Fantasie on the Great Organ of the Saint Ustache Church in Paris. <BR><U>His timing is 9'56".</U> This album is an inaugural recording made by Dorian Recordings (DOR-90134) <BR>with a remarkable degree of sound quality (DDD). <BR>I hope having helped you! <BR>Greetings <BR>Vincent Lef&egrave;vre, secretary of the non-profit assoc. "Organs in Flanders" <BR>vlefevere@unicall.be</HTML>   --------------CDAFC8E1AC957373F487A6A9--    
(back) Subject: Re: Digital Organs: live pipes headed for extinction? From: "JAMES H HAILEY" <BALD1@prodigy.net> Date: Thu, 21 Aug 1997 13:34:29 -0500     -----Original Message----- From: ScottFop <ScottFop@aol.com> To: Pipechat@pipechat.org <Pipechat@pipechat.org>; Piporg-L@cnsibm.Albany.Edu <Piporg-L@cnsibm.Albany.Edu> Date: Saturday, January 03, 1998 2:01 PM Subject: Re: Digital Organs: live pipes headed for extinction?     >In a message dated 98-01-03 13:31:25 EST, you write: > ><< Although I am extremely fond of fine pipe organs, I must say that I > > believe economics has rendered the breed a dinosaur> > >> >>>Scott Foppiano >I too enjoy and prefer to play a pipe. But, for most of us, in order to >get the wide variety of tones that is typically find on a large pipe, we >must use the digitals. While I disagree that $10,000.00 per rank is >outrageous, I also understand that this price is completely out of >range for most of our churches pocket books.   >Also, most churches will not accomodate a large pipe, simply >because of the enormous amount of room that is required. >Therefore, a digital, I am an Allen fan, is a very good alternative. >Jim   >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >    
(back) Subject: Howard Goodall's Organ Works (Australia) From: markq@mail.flex.com.au (Mark Quarmby) Date: Mon, 5 Jan 1998 00:02:25 +1000   I have just read this week's TV guide and discovered that the ABC is repeating the series of "Howard Goodall's Organ Works".   The first episode is to be shown on ABC-TV on Wednesday 7 January at 9.45pm. I presume the other episodes will be shown at the same time on following weeks, but it would be wise to check the TV guide. According to the schedule, the episode lasts 25 minutes.   Having seen the series last time, I can strongly recommend it as one of the best introductions to the organ and its history that I have seen on television.   Don't forget to set your video!   Cheers,     Mark      
(back) Subject: Much happier From: JILLIAN SCHULTHEIS <organgeek@geocities.com> Date: Sun, 04 Jan 1998 08:34:32 -0500   Well, guess what... I'm not getting the Hammond after all! It was only a B2 and not a C3. I am going to this place again to see the Conn organ that I like MUCH better. Have to go.   Jillian  
(back) Subject: Re: VT Recital From: Paul Opel <popel@sover.net> Date: Sun, 4 Jan 1998 15:37:08 -0400   Well, my recital on New Year's Eve went well, except that the videotape done by the church members ended up with two hours of me at the console- with no sound! The First Night did have various crews taping the evening's, though, and they put a nice clip of a 17th century Portuguese battle piece on the local cable channel. That take came out well- good advertising for me, the church, and organ music in general. (The second pass tenor f of the notoriously unstable Oboe jumped up a step to g, and I had to rewrite the final cadence on the fly).   This was the first time our town has done a First Night celebration, and it looks like a keeper. They sold about 1500 buttons (not bad, considering that the total population is about ten times that), and had a good turnout, despite the 5 degree weather (-15 C). I had small audiences- maybe 40 or so- but those who were there were enthusiastic, and they'll have me back next year. If anyone else's town decides to do one of these, put on an event- mine was the only classical music show, and people were glad for the option to the reggae, country, and rock otherwise out there.   On to 1998!   Paul Opel   http://www.sover.net/~popel      
(back) Subject: Re: Howard Goodall's Organ Works (Australia) From: " Vincent lefèvre" <vlefevere@unicall.be> Date: Sun, 04 Jan 1998 21:21:39 +0100     --------------06A75CFD7AE31270BB3AFDC7 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1 Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable X-MIME-Autoconverted: from 8bit to quoted-printable by relay.unicall.be id VAA12588       Mark Quarmby wrote:   > I have just read this week's TV guide and discovered that the ABC is > repeating the series of "Howard Goodall's Organ Works". > > The first episode is to be shown on ABC-TV on Wednesday 7 January at > 9.45pm. I presume the other episodes will be shown at the same time on > following weeks, but it would be wise to check the TV guide. According= to > the schedule, the episode lasts 25 minutes. > > Having seen the series last time, I can strongly recommend it as one of= the > best introductions to the organ and its history that I have seen on > television. > > Don't forget to set your video! > > Cheers, > > Mark > >   Is there anyone who would be willing to tape this tv broadcast (for priva= te use). I would be pleased to pay for it.Vincent lef=E8vre (E-mail vlefevere@unicall.be)     --------------06A75CFD7AE31270BB3AFDC7 Content-Type: text/html; charset=us-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML> &nbsp;   <P>Mark Quarmby wrote: <BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=CITE>I have just read this week's TV guide and discovered that the ABC is <BR>repeating the series of "Howard Goodall's Organ Works".   <P>The first episode is to be shown on ABC-TV on Wednesday 7 January at <BR>9.45pm.&nbsp; I presume the other episodes will be shown at the same time on <BR>following weeks, but it would be wise to check the TV guide.&nbsp; According to <BR>the schedule, the episode lasts 25 minutes.   <P>Having seen the series last time, I can strongly recommend it as one of the <BR>best introductions to the organ and its history that I have seen on <BR>television.   <P>Don't forget to set your video!   <P>Cheers,   <P>Mark <BR>&nbsp; <BR><B><U><A HREF="mailto:requests@pipechat.org"></A></U></B>&nbsp;</BLOCKQUOTE> Is there anyone who would be willing to tape this tv broadcast (for private use). I would be pleased to pay for it.Vincent lef&egrave;vre (E-mail vlefevere@unicall.be) <BR>&nbsp;</HTML>   --------------06A75CFD7AE31270BB3AFDC7--    
(back) Subject: Re: Digital Organs: live pipes headed for extinction? From: CDKrug <CDKrug@aol.com> Date: Sun, 4 Jan 1998 15:53:11 EST   There are several things that cause me grief as an organist:   First, a neglected pipe organ. Of all the keyboard instruments in the universe, nothing is worse. Except perhaps a wealthy parish with a neglected organ.   Second, a church that buys an organ beyond their means and who cannot afford to even have it tuned for Christmas.   Third, a wealthy parish who could well afford an "important" instrument who doesn't buy one.   Unfortunatly, in my part of NJ-USA, neglected pipes seem to be the rule raher than the exception. And I can name several wealthy parishes that have truly hideous instruments.   When my church had a meeting last year about the future of the parish, one of the "dreams and desires" was for a pipe organ. Now, space is a bit of a consideration--you could probably fit a 2/7or 8 in there, but not much more. But what really concerns me would be maintenance. The maintenence of even a small instrument would be beyond the means of my congregation--as we struggle to pay our pastors monthly insult of a salary.   OTOH, a digital would be ideal, IMO--buy once, pay once, plus a small fee for the annual service.   Of course, if someone were to hit the lottery and donate a 2/8 tracker and a sizable endowment for maintenance, I would be the last to object.   Wishing my parishoners good luck this new year     Charles  
(back) Subject: Tracker with a glass case? From: CDKrug <CDKrug@aol.com> Date: Sun, 4 Jan 1998 15:57:27 EST   That would be way cool--if a bit ugly from an appearance standpoint:   Make the keydesk and the case up to the windchests out of glass, to show off the mechanical guts. Has anyone ever done this?   Of course, you'd still want to make the pipecase out of a suitable hardwood. Of course, glass reflects sound well. Perhaps it would work there as well, with proper treatment  
(back) Subject: Re: Tracker with a glass case? From: Bob Loesch <rrloesch@jps.net> Date: Sun, 04 Jan 1998 13:40:14 -0800   At 15:57 1/4/98 EST, CDKrug wrote: >That would be way cool--if a bit ugly from an appearance standpoint: >   Never seen it done, but I've seen many theatre organs installed with glass shutters, so I don't think it would be a bad idea.   Just from my own view, I don't feel it would be ugly. I think pipe organs (inside and outside) are beautiful...     Regards,   Bob        
(back) Subject: RE: Tracker with a glass case? From: David J Neal <david@neal.u-net.com> Date: Sun, 4 Jan 1998 22:21:06 -0000   Edinburgh Cathedral organ has a glass panel round the back through which you can see much of the workings.       -----Original Message----- From: Bob Loesch [SMTP:rrloesch@jps.net] Sent: 04 January 1998 21:40 To: PipeChat; pipechat@pipechat.org Subject: Re: Tracker with a glass case?   At 15:57 1/4/98 EST, CDKrug wrote: >That would be way cool--if a bit ugly from an appearance standpoint: >   Never seen it done, but I've seen many theatre organs installed with glass shutters, so I don't think it would be a bad idea.   Just from my own view, I don't feel it would be ugly. I think pipe organs (inside and outside) are beautiful...     Regards,   Bob         "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org        
(back) Subject: Re: Tracker with a glass case? From: Ben Baldus <bbaldus@voyager.net> Date: Sun, 04 Jan 1998 18:48:50 -0500   Dear List:   Check out the organ at Chevy Chase Presbyterian Church. Kenneth Lowenberg is the musician. It has at least a partial glass case so as to allow excellent stained glass to be seen from several vantage points.   Ben Baldus    
(back) Subject: Re: Digital Organs: live pipes headed for extinction? From: NFexec <NFexec@aol.com> Date: Sun, 4 Jan 1998 19:28:55 EST   You must realize that $ 10,000.00 per rank is quite reasonable considering all the work that is going into the pipe organ. Here is an example:   Just to build the pipes, the pipe maker must cast sheets of metal, plane the metal to thicnkess, size the metal, age the metal, (or get metal cast months before) cut the metal to the right dimensions, roll out each pipe, make languids, solder the pipes (just for flues, reeds are a whole other story) Then a person must rack each induvidual pipe. The voicer then takes the pipes and voices them to fit the church, cuts them to the final length, wich may take many days. Now that is just the pipes, then a wind chest must be built, which takes weeks. umber isn't cheap either, usually clear pine, and in some cases Mahogany is used for the wind chests, wich can cost up to and more than $ 4.00 a board foot (a board foor is a piece 12" x 12" by 1" thick) Then the keybards take about 400 hours to make each one. Of course before all this is done, the organ must be designed which can take   ----- I have to say that your points are perfect. Except that the real issue here is that pipe organs versus the high quality digital organs (and they keep getting better) as discussed here are LESS EXPENSIVE than the "real thing" for all of the reasons you mentioned. The high cost of labor that goes into "the real king of instruments" certainly is a major difference - along with the cost of the materials to which you refer. If I had the budget, I would much prefer a real pipe organ... somewhat based on the sound, and somewhat based on the difference in maintenance. However, MOST individuals, churches, and other organizations have budgets to meet; hence, (in my opinion) the hottest point of debate here. Clearly, the quality of sound is the top point. But if one has a top contender, then $$$ replaces it; yes? And . . . if digital organs improve even more, I'd say the production of new pipe organs will be at a serious risk. Rebuilding, maintaining, and possibly re-installing "used" pipe organs will probably take on a new meaning. The economics of it all just makes (unfortunately) lots-o-sense.  
(back) Subject: The Phantom Organ From: Kevin Cartwright <kevin1@alaweb.com> Date: Sun, 04 Jan 1998 18:46:26 -0600   TO: PipeChat, and Alan Laufman, Organ Clearing House:   I have just subscribed to PipeChat, now I am using it. I have a problem with my 19 rank Wicks at church. The organ I learned to play on is now trying to kill me. There have been a plague of problems recently. First, on a performance night a Rohr Schalmei 4' pipe valve stuck OPEN. This little incident forced me to perform a small pipectomy. Later, during a church service, problem #2 occured. The Trumpette 8' would turn itself on and off at different intervals during hyms and the postlude. It still does this today (along with the fact the valve is STILL stuck OPEN after a month). The most recent problem has been the largest one. Now, during playing, one key might suddenly have the value of having a heart attack, and falling dead on the manuals, pressing every key. Of course, being 15 years old, and teaching myself on that organ, I have this bad feeling the church is going to make me stop practicing and playing. The organ has become so horrible, I think the last seconds of my life may be spent watching an avalanche of pipes rolling toward my head from the large windchest chest over the choir loft. If anyone has any idea of what just might be causing any of these three problems, please reply. :~)   Kevin Cartwright Greenville, Alabama kevin1@alaweb.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Tracker with a glass case? From: Giwro <Giwro@aol.com> Date: Sun, 4 Jan 1998 19:54:00 EST   In a message dated 98-01-04 16:50:01 EST, you write:   << Never seen it done, but I've seen many theatre organs installed with glass shutters, so I don't think it would be a bad idea. >>   The Von Beckerath tracker here in First United Methodist Church, Redlands, CA, has plexiglass swell shutters. Kinda neat - fun for the pipe organ encounters AGO kids thing...   Jonathan  
(back) Subject: Re: Tracker with a glass case? From: Ken <mewzishn@spec.net> Date: Sun, 04 Jan 1998 20:06:37 +0000   Doesn't the large Kney in Canada's Roy Thompson Hall have some/much casework in glass?   The 2-manual Abbott and Sieker mechanical action instrument at Claremont United Methodist Church, in southern California, near Los Angeles, has glass panels between the console and the pipework above, between which is sandwiched the thin cables of the action functioning much like wooden trackers might. The appearance to the casual observer is of a detached console.   Ken Sybesma        
(back) Subject: Re: Howard Goodall From: markq@mail.flex.com.au (Mark Quarmby) Date: Mon, 5 Jan 1998 12:25:05 +1000   >Mark Quarmby wrote: >> >> I have just read this week's TV guide and discovered that the ABC is >> repeating the series of "Howard Goodall's Organ Works". >> ... > > >Rats! After about the 4th reading of this, it occurred to me that "ABC" >might not refer to "American Broadcasting Company." Rats again. > >At least I have the video tape of his Channel 4 four-part production. I >assume this will be a re-run of the original series. >--     Sorry about that! It did occur to me afterwards that some Americans might think I was talking about their ABC rather than the Australian Broadcasting Corporation! That is why I put "Australia" in the subject header so those opening the email would know I was talking about here and not there! :-)   The program has "R" next to it, so that would indicate it is a repeat of what we saw last year. Unfortunately they didn't advertise it last year, and most of us, myself included, missed the first episode (I have since seen a video of it).   Sorry if American organists all over the States have been spending valuable practice time consulting their television guides!       Mark      
(back) Subject: Re: Tracker with a glass case? From: Ken <mewzishn@spec.net> Date: Sun, 04 Jan 1998 20:34:40 +0000       Giwro wrote:   > The Von Beckerath tracker here in First United Methodist Church, Redlands, CA, > has plexiglass swell shutters. Kinda neat - fun for the pipe organ encounters > AGO kids thing...   Ah yes, I'd forgotten about that, although because it's rather dark inside that division one doesn't quite get the kind of view you'd think would be afforded from glass swell shades. It's been quite some years since I played on the instrument, but as I recall they're reasonably effective in carrying out the intended effect.   Ken Sybesma        
(back) Subject: Re: The Phantom Organ From: Bob Loesch <rrloesch@jps.net> Date: Sun, 04 Jan 1998 17:25:15 -0800   At 18:46 1/4/98 -0600, Kevin Cartwright wrote: >TO: PipeChat, >and Alan Laufman, Organ Clearing House: > > I have just subscribed to PipeChat, now I am using it. I have a >problem with my 19 rank Wicks at church. >First, on a performance night a Rohr Schalmei 4' pipe valve >stuck OPEN.   If this is typical Wicks direct-electric, the valve spring is probably broken. >problem #2 occured. The Trumpette 8' would turn itself on and off at different intervals during >hyms and the postlude. It still does this today (along with the fact >the valve is STILL stuck OPEN after a month). The most recent problem >has been the largest one. Now, during playing, one key might suddenly >have the value of having a heart attack, and falling dead on the >manuals, pressing every key.   You neglect to say if the Wicks has a solid-state relay, but if it does, a problem in that unit could cause both of the other problems.   Good luck!     Regards,   Bob        
(back) Subject: Re: Tracker with a glass case? From: RMaryman <RMaryman@aol.com> Date: Sun, 4 Jan 1998 21:19:26 EST   Not to show the 'guts' of the organ, but to perserve the view of the big stained-glass window at the rear of the chancel area...   The Reiger organ at Chevy Chase presbyterian church (On chevy chase circle at the DC/Maryland border) has a case (the main organ) made with large glass side and rear panels. This was done to prevent the organ from blocking the congregation's view of a large stained-glass window...a major concern when the church decided that they wanted a mechanical-action organ.   the swell division also has glass shutters so that people can see into the swell chamber.   Rick Maryman  
(back) Subject: Home Pipe Organ Installation From: "robert.cowley" <robert.cowley@MCI2000.com> Date: Sun, 04 Jan 1998 21:28:59 -0500   Having set back and keeping quite, I decided to address the latest issue of "Theatre Organ" Magazine, Nov/Dec issue. I have been waiting for someone to bring up the article "The Everett Oliver Residence Wurlitzer", but so far, nobody has, so I guess it's my job. First, one MUST give alot of credit to Mike Foley, co-owner of Foley-Baker, Inc., Pipe Organs, for a job well done. No, I don't work for him, just know of him! Second, those of us (or you) who don't like to make changes of any type regarding the "original" organ spects, should read this story......Personally, I don't believe that this organ would get the rating that it now has without those changes. An original 2/6 Wurlitzer was nothing to write home about. Third, If you looked at the pictures, notice the "PVC" windlines.......Those who don't like the PVC, still take a look. Mike did a GREAT job! My hat is off to you Mike. I think that if the change is for the better, than do it, if not, leave things alone. In this case, it looks like change was BEST. The new relay/keying system, in my book, is for the better. The only thing that I have done with old Wurlitzer (and Kimball) relays is, take the magnets off, scrap the rest! Makes great B.T.U. value.   So, enough said, so one and all, FLAME on, I have my fireproof suit on.   Have a good day, and again, Mike Foley, GREAT JOB!!!!!!!!!!!!!!   Bob Cowley RNC Consultants  
(back) Subject: Re: The Phantom Organ From: RMaryman <RMaryman@aol.com> Date: Sun, 4 Jan 1998 21:52:01 EST   Kevin-   IThe first problem sound like a weak or broken return spring. The return spring may also have slipped off the little metal tang that keeps it under tension.   the trumpet problem (random coming on and going off) could be that the control contacts for that switch are out of adjustment (set "too close") or could also be a problem in the relay (if it is a solid state type relay, a defective transistor or diode in the control circuit). there also could be a 'run' in the cabling (if it the old cotton-covered type).   Really it is hard to diagnose, but probably is a simple thing for a qualified service provider. the best thing to do is to leave a note on the console when you know that the tuner/technician is coming, and ask him to fis the problem. things like broken springs or stuck pallet valves due to dirt are commonly covered under maintenance contracts.   hope this helps.   Rick Maryman Staunton, VA  
(back) Subject: Re: VT Recital From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Sun, 4 Jan 1998 22:47:31 -0500   Congratulations Paul. Sounds like it was a great night. I'm envious, of course, of the cold weather!! My windows and door are open tonight (whew).   bruce cornely o o o __________ o o o ago (dean) ohs o o __________ o o  
(back) Subject: Re: Home Pipe Organ Installation From: Schwebung <Schwebung@aol.com> Date: Sun, 4 Jan 1998 22:55:19 EST   I also noted with interest the artice in the latest issue of Theatre Organ and agree 110% on the abilities and skill of Mike Foley!   He is certainly a credit to his profession! If anyone has seen the excellent installation in the Hastings/Colliano residence in North Truro, Massachusetts, they will see that Mike is certainly a craftsman!    
(back) Subject: Re: Digital Organs: live pipes headed for extinction? From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Sun, 4 Jan 1998 23:13:21 -0500   Charles, There are many well built mechanical action organs that go for years without service. You could do routine maintenance, and even learn to tune without much difficulty. I consider that part of my job: knowing how to maintain the equipment with which I work and of which I am in a sense curator. Believe me, it is not difficult to maintain a pipe organ, especially something as simple as an 8 rank instrument, unless, of course, you have to have 8 generals and 42 levels of memory!!!   bruce cornely o o o __________ o o o ago (dean) ohs o o __________ o o  
(back) Subject: Re: Digital Organs: live pipes headed for extinction? From: ScottFop <ScottFop@aol.com> Date: Sun, 4 Jan 1998 23:38:37 EST   In a message dated 98-01-04 16:04:07 EST, you write:   << There are several things that cause me grief as an organist: First, a neglected pipe organ. Of all the keyboard instruments in the universe, nothing is worse. Except perhaps a wealthy parish with a neglected organ. Second, a church that buys an organ beyond their means and who cannot afford to even have it tuned for Christmas. Third, a wealthy parish who could well afford an "important" instrument who doesn't buy one. >>     What about the church that has a substantial instrument and then offers a mere pittance and a quarter-time salary for the position?   Scott Foppiano    
(back) Subject: Re: Digital Organs: live pipes headed for extinction? From: dougcampbell@juno.com (Douglas A. Campbell) Date: Mon, 05 Jan 1998 01:12:02 EST     On Sun, 4 Jan 1998 23:13:21 -0500 cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) writes: >Charles, >There are many well built mechanical action organs that go for years >without service. You could do routine maintenance, and even learn to >tune without much difficulty. I consider that part of my job: >knowing >how to maintain the equipment with which I work and of which I am in a >sense curator. Believe me, it is not difficult to maintain a pipe >organ, especially something as simple as an 8 rank instrument, >unless, >of course, you have to have 8 generals and 42 levels of memory!!! > > bruce cornely o o o __________ o o o   Dear Bruce, Please explain how the either having or not having a multiple level memory combination action effects the ability to either tune an instrument or perform routine maintenance on a Wicks Direct Electric action ?   Apparently, some of us are not as knowledgeable about such complexities as we should be........I would have thought that the combination action had very little to do with the tuning of pipes!     Douglas A. Campbell Skaneateles, NY