PipeChat Digest #210 - Wednesday, January 21, 1998
 
Re: Virgil's Defense
  by Stephen F P Karr <karrlist@scescape.net>
Re: Virgil's Defense
  by Adam Levin <alevin@advance.net>
Jack Ossewarde NYC - Was Virgil
  by <cathedral@linknet.net>
Re: Virgil's Defense
  by <danbel@earthlink.net>
Re: Virgil
  by Rick Williams <Rick@netlink.nlink.com>
Re[2]: Virgil's Defense
  by <steve.lamanna@tavsnet.com>
Correction
  by Wildhirt, Richard <Richard.Wildhirt@PSS.Boeing.com>
Re: Printable BWV CD.....
  by o\r fiol <fiol@bway.net>
on pedal exercises
  by o\r fiol <fiol@bway.net>
on correct Bach tunings for organ
  by o\r fiol <fiol@bway.net>
on Livre Du Saint Sacrement
  by o\r fiol <fiol@bway.net>
How 2 quote Less & make posts into art
  by TonyIn219 <TonyIn219@aol.com>
Re: Virgil and Diane
  by Kevin.M.Simons-1 <Kevin.M.Simons-1@ou.edu>
Midiscan  Was: Re: Printable BWV CD.....
  by Ron Yost <musik@tcsn.net>
Re: Printable BWV CD.....
  by Bob Loesch <rrloesch@jps.net>
Re: Midiscan  Was: Re: Printable BWV CD.....
  by o\r fiol <fiol@bway.net>
Re:Purchasing My First
  by Billsgrand <Billsgrand@aol.com>
RINGS AND PLAYING
  by <steve.lamanna@tavsnet.com>
Re: Printable BWV CD.....
  by PHarri5833 <PHarri5833@aol.com>
Re:Purchasing My First
  by <jerry@cluff.net>
Re:  Re[2]: Virgil's Defense
  by BOBB BIRD <BOBBBIRD@aol.com>
Re: Showmanship ETC
  by Gordon Lucas & Larry McGuire <stops@globalnet.co.uk>
Re: Virgil & Diane
  by Gordon Lucas & Larry McGuire <stops@globalnet.co.uk>
Re: on correct Bach tunings for organ
  by Gordon Lucas & Larry McGuire <stops@globalnet.co.uk>
on ornamenting Bach
  by o\r fiol <fiol@bway.net>
Re: on correct Bach tunings for organ
  by o\r fiol <fiol@bway.net>
BACH CD FOUND!!!!!!COMPLETE INFORMATION!!
  by Glenn Day <kginc-bham@worldnet.att.net>
 


(back) Subject: Re: Virgil's Defense From: Stephen F P Karr <karrlist@scescape.net> Date: Wed, 21 Jan 1998 06:27:42 -0500 (EST)   >Hey (in offense)!! I have his Tocatta and Fugue CD, and I think it is >wonderful. I have tried to play as fast as he could, and so far, not I >or anyone I know can do it. He played this on the Royal Albert Hall >Organ in London.   I can, but that doesn't mean that I would perform it that way. Anthony Newton can perform it much faster than Fox, and does in public. Also, looking at the music in the Virgil Fox organ book or some such thing in a music store, Fox added in just a *few* little things (like at the end or the last section of the fugue, he arranged it with septuplets, and nonuplets instead of the thirty-second notes). I am impressed by a lot of the things he played (Perpetuum Mobile), and maybe even agree with some of his interpretations (French music, especially). I am also glad for the fact that he brought the organ around the world to many people.   _____ | |_____ | || |_____ |Stephen || |_____ ______|F.P. Karr| || |_____ ______ |o o || || || || || |_____ | o o| | o o||Student Organist || || |_____ |o o | |o o || || || || || || || | | o o| | o o||Organist and Director of Music, | |o o | |o o || Bethlehem Lutheran Church|| | | o o| | o o|| || || || || || || | |o o | |o o || Aiken, SC || || || || | | o o| | o o| \ / \ / \U/ \S/ \A/ \ / \ / |o o | |o o | V V V V V V V | o o| | o o|_____________________________________|o o | |o o || E E | E E E | E E | E E E | E E | || o o| | o o||_|_|_|_|_|_|_|_|_|_|_|_|_|_|_|_|_|_||o o |    
(back) Subject: Re: Virgil's Defense From: Adam Levin <alevin@advance.net> Date: Wed, 21 Jan 1998 08:43:46 -0500 (EST)   On Tue, 20 Jan 1998, Kevin Cartwright wrote: > Hey (in offense)!! I have his Tocatta and Fugue CD, and I think it is > wonderful. I have tried to play as fast as he could, and so far, not I > or anyone I know can do it. He played this on the Royal Albert Hall > Organ in London.   <sarcasm>Here here! If a player can't finish the St. Anne Prelude and Fugue in less than four minutes, they must not be any good.</sarcasm>   If you want speed, try Anthony Newman.   Seriously, though, speed ain't everything. I daresay that at least Virgil 1) knew when to slow down, and 2) used fast playing more effectively than some others I've heard.   -Adam      
(back) Subject: Jack Ossewarde NYC - Was Virgil From: cathedral@linknet.net Date: Wed, 21 Jan 1998 08:11:22 -0600 (CST)   Speaking of FAST players, I couldn't help but remember Jack Ossewarde, longtime organist at St Barthelemew's, Park Avenue, NYC. He could rip through anything faster than a speeding bullet. As a young pup, I was mesmerized by him.   His choir was characterized by a full operatic sound -- a far cry from the pristine English boychoir that is so popular today.   Bradley Hull (Anyone know what ever happened to him?) was his assistant. Bradley told the story that when Osseward wanted the vibrato increased in the choir, his technique was to get the men's sections singing, then he would turn to the women and say, "Alright girls, support that tone!"   Anyone remember Ossewarde? Or is that just ancient history?      
(back) Subject: Re: Virgil's Defense From: danbel@earthlink.net Date: Wed, 21 Jan 1998 06:14:26 -0800 (PST)   Virgil Fox needs no defense. His music spoke ( and still does) for it's self. His public performances spoke for themselves also. As Martha Stewart says, "This is a good thing!!!"   djb    
(back) Subject: Re: Virgil From: "Rick Williams" <Rick@netlink.nlink.com> Date: Wed, 21 Jan 1998 08:41:05 -0600   Otto Pebworth wrote:   -> Bravo, Doug=21 Listening to Virgil Fox taught me how to =22sense=22 = and =22feel=22 the spirit of the music. Listening to some other=27s = recordings makes me wonder if there wasn=27t perhaps a cyborg playing the = pieces. :)   Virgil was my introduction to pipe organ music. I grew up in a gospel = tradition and had never even seen a pipe organ. I bought an album on a = whim from Lincoln Center on which he played Frank=27s Grand Piece = Symphonique. I don=27t remember all the other cuts on the album, but = spent many happy hours listening to that piece over and over. I have = since heard many other renditions of the piece but still love to hear that = one again. I am also a burgeoning organist. Working hard, making = progress and thanking everyone who has aided me. =20   Rick Williams   = = = = = = = = = = =20  
(back) Subject: Re[2]: Virgil's Defense From: steve.lamanna@tavsnet.com Date: Wed, 21 Jan 98 09:56:30 -0500     Virgil Fox came to the Shea's Theatre 4 times in the 1970's when I booked him in there.   I have been watching this string with interest and now can't resist comment.   Virgil could play any way he damn well pleased, depending on the circumstances.   Certainly, his artistry was enormous, even if some more conservative types did not approve.   His church work, including dedications, were decidedly more reserved, as well as concert works with orchestra.   The Revelation Lights years were theatrical. It was a time, (for you younger ones who don't remember) of Bernstein, etc... Television was just being discovered and conductors and performers who never moved at a podium/console really never got noticed.   Fox had an amazing memory....keeping somewhere around 200 concert works in his head. In rehearsal, which usually was late at night, he would play almost any of these at double speed just to refresh.   Anyone who makes a statement about his playing ability one way or the other has not looked at all sides of Virgil's artistry.   A showman?....of course, in later years even more so...   A virtuoso?.....you bet your Arp....how else would someone have finished Peabody so quickly...the 40's and 50's were certainly not a time when showmanship in organists was getting them a lot of recognition in the classical world.   Rather, these were buttoned up Donna Reed and Fred McMurray types who went to church for their organ concerts....and recognition by the AGO was given to Virgil not for his light show in the 70's, but for his talent in the 50's....     Steve LaManna      
(back) Subject: Correction From: "Wildhirt, Richard" <Richard.Wildhirt@PSS.Boeing.com> Date: Wed, 21 Jan 1998 07:26:30 -0800   Stephan F P Karr wrote:   Anthony Newton can perform it much faster than Fox.   It's NEWMAN, not Newton. NEWMAN! Organist, not cookie.   Richard Wildhirt Boeing Site Operations Renton, Washington (425) 234-8051   "There is nothing remarkable about it. All one has to do is hit the right notes at the right time, and the instrument plays itself." -- J. S. Bach    
(back) Subject: Re: Printable BWV CD..... From: "o\r fiol" <fiol@bway.net> Date: Wed, 21 Jan 1998 11:03:26 -0600   In the event that you never get a hold of this CD, there is a program called MIDISCAN which apparently will convert sheet music into standard midi files using a normal H.P. scanner. I've not tried the program myself, but since I'm totally blind, it would be very useful to me because relatively little print music has made it over to braille.   Thanks, OrlandoAt 12:55 AM 1/21/98 -0600, you wrote: >Greetings, >Before Christmas last, I received an advertisement for a CD-ROM >containing the organ compositions of J.S. Bach which could be printed. >If any of my esteemed colleagues know of this, I would be most >appreciative for the information. Please e-mail me privately as I do >not want to bandwidth from important topics. > >D. GLenn Day > > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >    
(back) Subject: on pedal exercises From: "o\r fiol" <fiol@bway.net> Date: Wed, 21 Jan 1998 11:06:28 -0600   I am a pianist and keyboardist eager to begin learning Classical pedal technique. I think it would be best to teach myself at first, since all I get when I try to play pedals are tone clusters. To that end, can anyone recommend any methods or compositions that are good for developing dexterity with the feet? Since most of the appropriate sheet music for pedal exercises would probably not be in braille, would anyone know of some CD roms or would anyone be willing to send me some midi files with some basic exercises?   Thanks, Orlando    
(back) Subject: on correct Bach tunings for organ From: "o\r fiol" <fiol@bway.net> Date: Wed, 21 Jan 1998 11:09:57 -0600   Based on my knowledge of Bach's working temperaments, I assume that Bach used either Werkmeister or a quarter or sixth comma meantone tuning on the organs he played. If this is so, does anyone recommend any recordings of Bach's organ works that are known to employ any of these tunings? I'm particularly interested in the trio sonatas and the canonical variations on Vom Himmel Hoch.   Thanks, Orlando    
(back) Subject: on Livre Du Saint Sacrement From: "o\r fiol" <fiol@bway.net> Date: Wed, 21 Jan 1998 11:15:49 -0600   Having studied all of Messiaen's organ works, I seem to be unable to get into LIVRE DU SAINT SACREMENT, his last organ work. I was just curious if anyone else has some tips to better enhance my appreciation. I even like LIVRE D'ORGUE and MESSE DE LA PENTECOTE better than LIVRE DU SAINT SACREMENT, nno small feat, since most consider Messiaen's works from the fifties to be his least interesting. Any impressions or suggestions would be greatly appreciated.   Orlando Fiol    
(back) Subject: How 2 quote Less & make posts into art From: TonyIn219 <TonyIn219@aol.com> Date: Wed, 21 Jan 1998 12:17:25 EST   If I see an excessively long "quote," I delete the entire post and go on to something original. Why?   Because writing is an art form, much like organ music, and it is in OUR OWN best interests to honor our truest and highest selves by creating literary filet mignon, not spam.   When we compose music, we don't just play a bunch of notes (unless we are Benjamin Britten or the writers of the score of the Chicago Lyric Opera's current production of Amistad).   Historically, musical pieces are built on the success of earlier pieces, and when I read a post, I want to know how someone's previous post has altered/enhanced/affected/influenced/inspired/angered a subsequent posters' perception of the organ craft. Then, and only then, does an individual post become an original melody, and the digest becomes a symphony--something fresh, new and exciting.   The internet is full of literary junk. As artists, let's try to rise above the spam and be creative--no matter what keyboard we happen to "playing."   Thank you for your support,   John Carington Formerly IDOEDITING@aol.com but due to excessive spam, created this name specifically for "organ" use. Chesterton, Indiana Home of John's Big, Bad Lowrey: "Authentic analog sound, timeless beauty, enduring quality--all at a garage- sale price."  
(back) Subject: Re: Virgil and Diane From: "Kevin.M.Simons-1" <Kevin.M.Simons-1@ou.edu> Date: Wed, 21 Jan 1998 11:51:30 -0600   Howdy List,   I just wanted to throw my five cents or so into the Virgil and Diane debate.   I think both of them are wonderful. Both of them are high achievers at their art, and have tons of personality to boot. Diane has made numerous contributions to the world of church music with her book, as well as with her improvisations. They may not be J.S. Bach, but for some organists, these are about the limit of their ability. I disagree that Virgil did not introduce people to the organ.   I don't think anything could be further from the truth. Whether or not they even remembered the pieces that Virgil played is beside the point. Those audience member's perspective of the organ was probably changed forever. In the first Virgil recording I ever got (Soli deo Gloria), he showed his scholarship as well as his amazing virtuosity. To put down these two organists is to put down the profession as a whole. So what if they're flashy? I personally enjoy seeing how many rings Diane can continue to play with!   So, enough with all the bashing. These two have made a valuable contribution to the organ world, and classical music at large. We should hail them for being the fine artists that they are.   Kevin M. Simons  
(back) Subject: Midiscan Was: Re: Printable BWV CD..... From: Ron Yost <musik@tcsn.net> Date: Wed, 21 Jan 1998 10:05:58 -0800   At 11:03 AM 1/21/98 -0600, you wrote: >In the event that you never get a hold of this CD, there is a program >called MIDISCAN which apparently will convert sheet music into standard >midi files using a normal H.P. scanner. I've not tried the program myself, >but since I'm totally blind, it would be very useful to me because >relatively little print music has made it over to braille.   Hi all!   Well, as a purchaser of Midiscan I can tell you it is a truly *terrible* program!!!!! It is *barely* functional, crude, VASTLY overpriced and just plain lousy!!!! (Yes, I HATE it!! AND the folks who peddle such junk as 'professional' music recognition software!) It would barely qualify as $20.00 shareware, much less its retail price of almost $300.00!   It produces a music recognition accuracy of barely 50% (even on simple two-hand piano music), so you will spend 90% of your time editing what Midiscan didn't recognize correctly.   There is NO on-going development of the software; NO attempt by the author to improve its accuracy. The user interface is stuck in pre-Windows 3.1 days and, apparently, will never be improved.   Ick! How do these companies stay in business?? :)   Ron Yost Paso Robles, Calif.  
(back) Subject: Re: Printable BWV CD..... From: Bob Loesch <rrloesch@jps.net> Date: Wed, 21 Jan 1998 10:13:18 -0800   At 11:03 1/21/98 -0600, o\r fiol wrote: >...there is a program >called MIDISCAN which apparently will convert sheet music into standard >midi files using a normal H.P. scanner.   Hi, List!   Anyone out there know ANYTHING about this program? Sounds GREAT!       Regards,   Bob        
(back) Subject: Re: Midiscan Was: Re: Printable BWV CD..... From: "o\r fiol" <fiol@bway.net> Date: Wed, 21 Jan 1998 13:19:25 -0600   Dear Ron,   Thanks for saving me some money and aggravation. Since OCR recognition for text has gotten so good, I figured it could get good for music. But, I guess I'll have to write something and get into programming to make things better. Lord knows I need to desifer some chords in my newly acquired copy of Messiaen's SAINT FRANCOIS D'ASSISE and there ain't no one around willing to spell them out for me. That piece sure isn't in braille yet.   Thanks, Orlando    
(back) Subject: Re:Purchasing My First From: Billsgrand <Billsgrand@aol.com> Date: Wed, 21 Jan 1998 13:21:26 EST   Hi All Some of the advice from the group: As a suggestion for a "starter" instrument I would suggest that you contact several of the local electronic dealers and ask to be kept posted about used instruments. (and I would be very upset if I purchased a $12,000 instrument and discovered in 6 months that I really didn't like it!) Electronics have a tendency to become "boring" after a period of time. -------------------------- Even though electronic are not my cup-O-tea, I still appreciate a pleasant sound. And don't forget, when you get down to the decision point, don't buy anything until they have fed you well!! Make 'em work for it!   I appreciate all responses to my plea. I think I will take my time before making any decisions and in the mean time enjoy the priviledge of playing a real organ at church. I guess a prayer or two next time I'm there wouldn't hurt either! BTW Adam Levin is really on to something by way of an inexpensive practice instrument. Homemade has a certain appeal to it.... hmmm. Thanks again to all Bill Costanzo  
(back) Subject: RINGS AND PLAYING From: steve.lamanna@tavsnet.com Date: Wed, 21 Jan 98 13:37:29 -0500     Speaking of rings and playing keyboards.....has anyone ever seen the trick that pianists/organists use to wear a lot of jewelry on their hands while playing?   (Hint: Custom designing)   :-)   Steve LaManna      
(back) Subject: Re: Printable BWV CD..... From: PHarri5833 <PHarri5833@aol.com> Date: Wed, 21 Jan 1998 13:44:16 EST   << o\r fiol wrote: ..there is a program called MIDISCAN which apparently will convert sheet music into standard midi files using a normal H.P. scanner. Hi, List! Anyone out there know ANYTHING about this program? Sounds GREAT! >>     Great for what - breaching copyright in yet another way!   Peter Harrison  
(back) Subject: Re:Purchasing My First From: jerry@cluff.net Date: Wed, 21 Jan 1998 11:59:28 +0000   just get an Ahlborn module and add keyboards> ********************************* gerald cluff http://www.cluff.net/used.htm for used pipe/electronic organ stuff **********************************  
(back) Subject: Re: Re[2]: Virgil's Defense From: BOBB BIRD <BOBBBIRD@aol.com> Date: Wed, 21 Jan 1998 14:21:02 EST   Thank you for saying that.   Bobb Partridge Sterling MA  
(back) Subject: Re: Showmanship ETC From: Gordon Lucas & Larry McGuire <stops@globalnet.co.uk> Date: Wed, 21 Jan 1998 19:45:42 GMT   At 07:57 PM 1/20/98, Shirley wrote: EDITTED   In our auditions .. we've heard both schools ...>the exciting, flamboyant .... as well as the .. understated more historically correct version.   Hmmmmm.   Interesting.   I have a single bound volume from a series of JS Bach's organ works published in the middle of the last century, with printed 'extracts' of JSB's own notes from his manuscripts of his various 'trills' and 'twiddly bits'. His pen'd 'squiggles' often contained a line through them, or a couple of dots, which was his own shorthanded notation which without the explanations of this book are meaningless.   The 'understated more historically correct' playing of these 'trills' aand 'twiddly bits' lends to this 'authoritive' version of those of his tocattas and fugues included in the book, a degree of difficulty that few could ever hope to surmount. Even the first 7 notes of the Tocatta and Fuge in D Moll (centred around the usual first 3 on A-G-A) lend a degree of interest and difficulty, that I wonder how many of his works have been so 'simplified' in subsequent editions.   When you consider that he (JSB) like many 'performers-of-their-own-works' usually wrote down just enough of the notes to remind himself what he had to play in each piece, what a mockery it is, to claim that one MUST only play what is on the page, no more, no less, when, from what I have seen, what is usually on the page is, at the end of the day, only that particular publisher's own 'in house version' of what was 'originally' on the page.   As a general aside, 'people' tend to regard the Flor Peeters edition of Bach as the definitive. Why that particular edition out of all that went before, or even, has come after????   To decry someone with the obvious technical ability of Virgil Fox, simply because he brought some sparkle to his performances that were more than just sheer musicianship, sounds more like jealousy than genuine critique. I speak as someone who never saw the man play, but I have listened frequently to his tapes, CD's, etc, for the last 27 years, and have never failed to be impressed by his performances. 'Come sweet Death' will always be one of the highlights, even on tape. What about his 'Fugue a la Gigue'. Not even the venerable Carlo can come close to Virgil's sheer exuberance and joy in playing this piece 'note perfect'....   Larry    
(back) Subject: Re: Virgil & Diane From: Gordon Lucas & Larry McGuire <stops@globalnet.co.uk> Date: Wed, 21 Jan 1998 19:45:57 GMT   >At 07:12 PM 1/20/98 -0800, Glenda wrote: > > How many times have I sat through a boring recital of someone from academia     It just goes to show . . . . you can play all the right notes, at all the right times . . . and it still sounds boring.   Without wishing to offend anyone in particular, it is people like the so called 'experts' who have made the pipe organ into what the public perceive as being a boring instrument.   Long live Virgil, Gorgeous George, and even Liberace!! At least they had some fun while they played (although George (Wright) still does of course)   Larry    
(back) Subject: Re: on correct Bach tunings for organ From: Gordon Lucas & Larry McGuire <stops@globalnet.co.uk> Date: Wed, 21 Jan 1998 19:46:02 GMT   > editted ... Based on my knowledge of Bach's working temperaments, I assume >that Bach used either Werkmeister or a quarter or sixth comma meantone tuning >on the organs he played. If this is so.....     If this was so, we would never have heard of 'The well tempered clavier' or his '48 preludes and fugues'.   These were all written to celebrate and promote the use of equal temperament.   As has been very well documented here and in Europe, Bach HATED meantone or unequal temperament of any kind, hence the above.   Larry    
(back) Subject: on ornamenting Bach From: "o\r fiol" <fiol@bway.net> Date: Wed, 21 Jan 1998 15:13:58 -0600   Not meaning to fly in the face of the period moovement, I think that the only way for three hundred year-old music to continue to be a living, breathing entity for ages to come, performers must embrace the question of ornamentation with some creativity. After learning what ornaments were common during Bach's time, I've felt free to mix and match acording to musical sense and my falable taste. Taste, and not necessarily robotic accuracy, is what is missing from music today. Classical music was never meant to be museum music; performers divorced from the living tradition have made it that way. Practices of ornamentation were passed down from teacher to student the way virtually nothing is passed down these days. All teachers seem to teach their students is how to listen to recordings and do research in libraries. While these things are paramount to a musical education, teachers also need to teach their pupils how to take chances and actually interpret scores while reproducing them.   Submitted in the spirit of musical freedom and respect for all, Orlando    
(back) Subject: Re: on correct Bach tunings for organ From: "o\r fiol" <fiol@bway.net> Date: Wed, 21 Jan 1998 15:19:16 -0600   I hate to say this, but you're wrong on both counts. Bach not only used but loved circular tuning. Equal temperament had not yet gained popular usage in Germany during Bach's day; it was mainly used in France and Italy. The very phrase "Welltempered Klavier" should tell the moderately intelligent that that klavier wasn't meant to be an equaltempered one, else the title would read "THE EQUALTEMPERED KLAVIER."    
(back) Subject: BACH CD FOUND!!!!!!COMPLETE INFORMATION!! From: Glenn Day <kginc-bham@worldnet.att.net> Date: Wed, 21 Jan 1998 14:27:52 -0600   My thanks to Steven Frank for this information!   D. Glenn Day   Hi, for those interested, I stumbled across the following at:   http://www.passportdesigns.com/p_jsb.html   It is a page at the Passport Designs web site. They are putting all of Bach's keyboard music on a CD ($199) in digital format (using one of their notation programs, no doubt.) I do not know who input the music.   I HAVE NO AFFILIATION WITH PASSPORT DESIGNS WHATSOEVER.   Here is some text from their page:   Over 2,000 Interactive Pages In Digital Format Print in Professional Sheet Music Format All Organ and Clavier Works Included   What is Bach: The Complete Keyboard Manuscripts on CD-ROM?   The Complete Keyboard Manuscripts on CD-ROM features over 2,000 pages of   engraver-quality sheet music that you can play, edit and print on your computer. Flawlessly transcribed from the Bach Gesellschaft of 1851, the   Complete Keyboard Manuscripts puts a professional resource, found only in specialty music stores and libraries, right at your fingertips.   Passport's Digital Notation Technology, the standard among music copyists, gives you the flexibility to audition each score, adjust the tempo, and transpose into any key. Using your sound card, keyboard or sound module, you can even choose which instrument will play the music for you. This is the perfect product for Educators, Students and Music Lovers alike.     Key Features   * Over 2,000 pages of engraver-quality sheet music that you can play, edit and print. * Search Engine allows you to quickly find any score by title and key signature. * Scores play back over your sound card, MIDI-compatible Sound Module or Keyboard. * Adjust Playback Tempo and Transpose Scores into any key. * Transpose notes and hear your music in any key. * Mute, Solo and Change Instrumentation features give you complete   control.   Manuscripts Included   Clavier Works   * The Inventions and Sinfonias * The Partitas * Sixteen Concertos on Works by Other Composers * Sonatas, Variations, Capriccios and more * Anna Magdalena's Notebook * Well-Tempered Clavier Book 1 and 2 * Goldberg Variations * French, English and other Suites * The Italian Concerto * Preludes, Fugues, Fantasies and Toccatas * Alternate Versions and Fragments   Organ Works   * Preludes, Fugues, Fantasies and Toccatas * The Six Trio Sonatas * The Six Concertos * Pieces from the Little Organ Book * Chorals and Choral Preludes * Six Schuebler Chorals * Alternate Versions and Fragments