PipeChat Digest #214 - Saturday, January 24, 1998
 
Re: MIDI vs copyright
  by RSiegel920 <RSiegel920@aol.com>
Re: t&f
  by Paul Opel <popel@sover.net>
Re: Hymn playing
  by Paul Opel <popel@sover.net>
Re: Pedals in Hymn Playing
  by Vernon Moeller <vernonm@ccsi.com>
T?&F?
  by OrganAngel <OrganAngel@aol.com>
Re: pedals in Hymn playing
  by ComposerTX <ComposerTX@aol.com>
Re: Correction
  by ManderUSA <ManderUSA@aol.com>
Re: t&f
  by Shirley <pnst@itw.com>
Re: pedals on hymns
  by Gordon Lucas & Larry McGuire <stops@globalnet.co.uk>
Re: MIDI vs copyright
  by Shirley <pnst@itw.com>
Questions on How to Hook Up Conn Electric Pipes
  by Gregory F. Klingler <klingler@IDT.NET>
another Hymn playing suggestion.
  by Jason D. Comet <bombarde8@juno.com>
Re: Pedals in Hymn Playing
  by Jason D. Comet <bombarde8@juno.com>
Re: T?&F?
  by Mac Hayes <mach37@ptw.com>
Re: pedals on hymns
  by OrganAngel <OrganAngel@aol.com>
Re: pedals on hymns
  by <DudelK@aol.com>
Re: pedals on hymns
  by Mac Hayes <mach37@ptw.com>
Re: t&f
  by bruce cornely <cremona84000@webtv.net>
Re: MIDI vs copyright
  by Glenda <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com>
Re: Questions on How to Hook Up Conn Electric Pipes
  by PipeLuvr <PipeLuvr@aol.com>
Tergiversating
  by Kevin Cartwright <kevin1@alaweb.com>
How about this one?
  by Kevin Cartwright <kevin1@alaweb.com>
How about this one?
  by Judy A. Ollikkala <71431.2534@compuserve.com>
Re: PipeChat Digest #213 - 01/23/98
  by Jim Reinhart <jimrein@main.ismi.net>
Re: PipeChat Digest #213 - 01/23/98
  by Kevin Cartwright <kevin1@alaweb.com>
Howard Goodall's Organ Works
  by Duncan Charig <charigd@illawarra.starway.net.au>
Re: MIDI vs copyright
  by CDKrug <CDKrug@aol.com>
Re: dual majors
  by o\r fiol <fiol@bway.net>
Re: MIDI vs copyright
  by o\r fiol <fiol@bway.net>
 


(back) Subject: Re: MIDI vs copyright From: RSiegel920 <RSiegel920@aol.com> Date: Fri, 23 Jan 1998 06:31:48 EST   re: copyright- there are some "suggested" standards re: fair use that were prepared by an adivsory consortium of publishing interests and were published as an appendix to the 1976 copyright act. These give some guidance concerning Fair Use. There is also a specific exception for performance rights in religious services so your don't have to rely on a First Amendment defense.  
(back) Subject: Re: t&f From: Paul Opel <popel@sover.net> Date: Fri, 23 Jan 1998 10:40:12 -0400   I have a caveat here- one of the churches I play for has a small congregation in a largish church, with the organ in the balcony. At that place, if there's enough organ to get the people below singing, I can barely hear them- and if I add anything for a last verse, they're out of there. I've had the usual run of ill-informed congregational complaints from time to time, but never about playing hymns too loud. Good advice in general, though.   Paul Opel   > My only advice is "don't play too loud"; you >should always be able to hear the congregation singing, and play so that >they have time to breathe and READ what they are singing. >Best of luck. > > bruce cornely o o o __________ o o o > ago (dean) ohs o o __________ o o >   http://www.sover.net/~popel      
(back) Subject: Re: Hymn playing From: Paul Opel <popel@sover.net> Date: Fri, 23 Jan 1998 10:40:23 -0400   Kenneth- Don't be afraid of the varied stanza on the exam. For the service playing test, it doesn't have to be very dramatic; simply soloing out the melody on another manual is enough to count, or even just playing one verse with and one without pedal on different registrations. I passed the exam a couple of years ago, and now I'm working towards the Colleague. Good luck!   Paul     Part of the exam will require such improvisations, and I hope they >won't be listening for anything too extravagant. >-- >Kenneth O. Woods kow987@dice.crane.navy.mil > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org     http://www.sover.net/~popel      
(back) Subject: Re: Pedals in Hymn Playing From: Vernon Moeller <vernonm@ccsi.com> Date: Fri, 23 Jan 1998 08:34:55 -0600   Maybe I haven't seen enough organists playing hymns, but *all* the organists I've seen glance downward at the pedals now and then.   There's an interesting pedal jump in JSB's famous setting of "Wachet Auf" - I forget what the interval is, maybe a 12th or a 15th or something like that, but I told my teacher that maybe ol' JSB put it in there as a test of one's faith, since in my book, it was definitely a "leap of faith."   \/\/\    
(back) Subject: T?&F? From: OrganAngel <OrganAngel@aol.com> Date: Fri, 23 Jan 1998 09:54:17 EST   Hello,   I was just wondering what Tocatta meant and what Fugue meant. I love the Tocatta and Fugue and I hope to someday be able to play it....that would be so cool! I have been playing the organ for two years so it would be way to hard right now.   Also their was a message about someone's dad not wanting them to major in organ...my dad and mom are all for it but as someone else had said their other relatives thought he was "koo koo" most of my relatives think the same thing (dosen't bother me though as someone else had quoted "I'd rather be a failure at something I love than be a success at something I hate." -Gerorge Burns   Thanks in advance everyone. You can e-mail me privately if you want so it dosen't add more mail to the list.   Take Care, Lauren (OrganAngel@aol.com)   "Music is enough for a lifetime but a lifetime is not enough for music!"  
(back) Subject: Re: pedals in Hymn playing From: ComposerTX <ComposerTX@aol.com> Date: Fri, 23 Jan 1998 11:35:23 EST   My organ teacher, Emmett Smith, [from TCU, not from the Cowboys] said that the feet play the bass line, with at least the main manual coupled to the pedals, the right hand plays the soprano, the left hand plays the tenor and both hands share the alto. Makes for a good way to become familiar with the technique, because you can start with S/T, T/B, S/B, S/A/T, on your way to being able to play SATB. Happy hymning. Dray  
(back) Subject: Re: Correction From: ManderUSA <ManderUSA@aol.com> Date: Fri, 23 Jan 1998 12:11:20 EST   In a message dated 98-01-21 10:41:56 EST, Richard Wildhirt writes:   << Stephan F P Karr wrote: Anthony Newton can perform it much faster than Fox. It's NEWMAN, not Newton. NEWMAN! Organist, not cookie. >>   Who gives a FIG?   Sorry - coffee break time!   Malcolm  
(back) Subject: Re: t&f From: Shirley <pnst@itw.com> Date: Fri, 23 Jan 1998 13:17:43     >RE this: All you organ majors out there, how much trouble did you have from >your parents when you decided to take this track? Mine are great. They are >very supportive of my aspirations to be a pro.     This isn't exactly what you're asking, but maybe this experience will help.   I went back to school to get my Bachelor of Music in music ed. with a piano concentration, in my late 30s.   One of my classmates was a young man who was a fabulous trumpeter. There weren't too many music students at Temple U. who got my attention, but he was one of them.   His mom, however, wouldn't let him just major in performance.... so he declared a double major with Mus. Ed. He did real well in his grades in the performance end of things and in the related subjects like aural theory, written theory, and music history. But when it came to courses in the education field, his GPA really dropped a lot. It just wasn't what he wanted to do.   Now, he is a part of a brass quintet that, considering they're new on the music scene around here, they're doing real well. They're all Temple grads, and most of them graduated in the same year. A good, tight, musical sound. And every one of them extremely talented. They'll do fine.   Consider, however, that most music students when they graduate don't "make it" for whatever reason. Granted, in instrumental music, the competition for the symphony chairs that are open is great. In your line, however, consider the number of full-time positions there are in the country, and how many of those require a Master's degree in organ performance, or even a DMA. Yes, set your sights high, but be practical, too.   --Shirley Temple University Class of '93 Summa Cum Laude  
(back) Subject: Re: pedals on hymns From: Gordon Lucas & Larry McGuire <stops@globalnet.co.uk> Date: Fri, 23 Jan 1998 18:28:56 GMT   At 07:48 PM 1/22/98 -0600, o\r fiol wrote: > I think the blind need a leap guider that they could install on the keys or something.....   Why not get the equivalent attached to the underside of the opened lid, so that you could do just that.. provided it projected just enough for your finger tips to feel it???   By the way, on the subject of looking at your feet when playing, do you look to see where the gas, clutch, or brake pedals are when driving the car??   Larry    
(back) Subject: Re: MIDI vs copyright From: Shirley <pnst@itw.com> Date: Fri, 23 Jan 1998 13:31:22   At 00:02 01/23/98 EST, you wrote:   >It gets really odd for teachers. I can make "fair use copies of excerpts" for >my students. How is that defined? It isn't. But if I made 2000 copies of >"Sweeny Todd" for my students, Stephen Sondheim would be right to object. Now >consider this: Teachers may make those copies, but if the piece is performed, >every performer needs a legal copy.   OK, how about this:   I'm music director/pianist/conductor for a middle school production of "The Sound of Music." I have the piano/conductor score. The thing won't stay open without my breaking the spine of the book. We have paid the rental on the score and all royalties for all performances in this auditorium. Is it ok then for me to make a copy of the score to use for this production, since I already have rented one?   And then this that's been in the back of my mind since this thread started:   What about theatre organists? When I played, I would buy a copy of the music, and then arrange it for my performances. And I'm sure that's how most TO artists operate. Is the performance of that new arrangement of a copyrighted piece an infringement?   --Shirley  
(back) Subject: Questions on How to Hook Up Conn Electric Pipes From: "Gregory F. Klingler" <klingler@IDT.NET> Date: Fri, 23 Jan 1998 14:06:45 -0500   Hi All,   I recently acquired 4 "sets" of Conn Electric pipes that I want to hook up to my Conn 640 this Saturday (for the moment - will be eventually connected to a 645 which has been "modified-for-pipes" within a few weeks).   The sets are; 2: small, 1: Symmetrical and 1: Large Bass.   The question is this: How do I hook them up to the 640 for now using the internal amp? I've been e-mailed a few tips but there all different. The existing internal amp seems to have a lot of power but I don't want to damage anything while I do this. What I want to do is hook them up (and I don't mind disconnecting the internal / console 6 x 9 speaker and "tapping" THAT line for the pipes in order to make this work) without going through all kinds of modifications. As I understand it, if I take 2 sets and run   them in series and the other 2 sets and run them in series then run these SERIES sets in PARALLEL that will equal the "Ohmage" of the pipes that will be wired in placed of the console 6 x 9 that I'll disconnect (i.e. 8 + 8 = 16 8 + 8 = 16 16 / 2 = 8 ohms). Is this the correct way to do this? If not, please advise.   Also, is there a way I can ad an additional power amp using this method or is there a simple way to ad one if needed?   Thanking all in advance for your help (and understanding of the pipe people taking up their list to ask this question).   Gregory F. Klingler Organist - Gateway Cathedral Staten Island, NY   PS - If you don't mind, please post publicly (so others can view your suggestions and have the opportunity to make sure the suggestions are correct and will not damage anything). Thanks again.   PPS - For me, for private / personal use, not the church (we have a Rodgers)      
(back) Subject: another Hymn playing suggestion. From: bombarde8@juno.com (Jason D. Comet) Date: Thu, 22 Jan 1998 15:40:51 -0500   Now, My two cents worth.   When I play, I don't sing. Because I DON'T SING, and because I sometimes get too int othe words instead of the music. Instead, I think the words to myself. I learn them before hand, and I also hum.   Hear's (:-) ) my suggestion:   When I play hymns, I hum the notes, just like I was singing. When you know that you are going to take a breath, Pause the playing until you regain. I've come up with this myself, and where ever I play, they ALWAYS congradulate me on my hymn playing. Also, befor eyou do the live performance, look at the punctuation, where the bar lines are positioned, and where there are little 'interlludes' in the acccomp. Plan your moves carefully. I've done enough hymn playing that it is almost like second nature to me. When I get an offer to sub at a church, I usually do the hymn last of all. BUT THAT'S JUST ME!!!!!! ***DON'T*** TRY THAT YOURSELF UNLESS YOU CAN SIGHT READ HYMNS *110%* YOUR FIRST TIME!!!! I've been known to do HYMNAL SERVICES where I get a call a night or two in advance, and just use hymns instead of playing P&T&F's in ht ekey of whatever. I'm lucky, though, My hymnal has most hymns that have MOST of the hymns in EASY keys. (i.e. Eb, C, D, F, G, (A once in a while. THat's not my favorite key), Bb, Ab (once in a while also), and if it's the case of one of the psalters, a minor key. (No ,That's not Aminor). Well, Later for now, and keep up the hymn playing.   Jason Comet bombarde8@juno.com |\ | \ O  
(back) Subject: Re: Pedals in Hymn Playing From: bombarde8@juno.com (Jason D. Comet) Date: Fri, 23 Jan 1998 15:06:20 -0500   >There's an interesting pedal jump in JSB's famous setting of "Wachet >Auf" - I forget what the interval is, maybe a 12th or a 15th or >something like that, but I told my teacher that maybe ol' JSB put it >in there as a test of one's faith, since in my book, it was >definitely a "leap of faith." ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ I played this last Christmas, and I don't think that I looked down! (However, It was about a month or two ago. I can't remember if I did or not.)   Jason Comet bombarde8@juno.com |\ | \ O  
(back) Subject: Re: T?&F? From: Mac Hayes <mach37@ptw.com> Date: Fri, 23 Jan 1998 12:25:05 -0800   OrganAngel wrote: > Hello, > I was just wondering what Tocatta meant and what Fugue meant. I love the > Tocatta and Fugue and I hope to someday be able to play it....   To the List:   What is this "toccata and fugue" thing? I know of dozens of compositions by dozens of composers titled "Toccata and Fugue in __ [enter key-name here]" and often bearing an additional descriptive name.   Are these most recent references to be attributed to J. S. Bach's "Toccata and Fugue in D Minor," BWV 565?   -- Mac Hayes mach37@ptw.com Notary Sojac    
(back) Subject: Re: pedals on hymns From: OrganAngel <OrganAngel@aol.com> Date: Fri, 23 Jan 1998 17:21:29 EST   In a message dated 98-01-23 13:34:26 EST, you write:   << By the way, on the subject of looking at your feet when playing, do you look to see where the gas, clutch, or brake pedals are when driving the car?? >> Good point, Larry!   Lauren   "Music is love in search of word!"  
(back) Subject: Re: pedals on hymns From: DudelK@aol.com Date: Fri, 23 Jan 1998 17:39:45 EST   In a message dated 98-01-23 17:28:19 EST, you write:   << < By the way, on the subject of looking at your feet when playing, do you look to see where the gas, clutch, or brake pedals are when driving the car?? >> Only when playing trio sonatas in a rented car! :))  
(back) Subject: Re: pedals on hymns From: Mac Hayes <mach37@ptw.com> Date: Fri, 23 Jan 1998 14:58:51 -0800   > ... > By the way, on the subject of looking at your feet when playing, do you look > to see where the gas, clutch, or brake pedals are when driving the car?? >   Do you suppose there might be a slight difference between using three pedals and thirty-two pedals? Not to mention what you are doing with your fingers at the same time?   -- Mac Hayes mach37@ptw.com Notary Sojac    
(back) Subject: Re: t&f From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Fri, 23 Jan 1998 18:07:59 -0500   Sorry, Paul. I forgot to consider the organ in the "wrong" end of the room. I tried to get my former pastor, on Sundays when the congregation was really small, to have them all sit in the back of the church and for him to preach from the center. They would still be able to see the focal point of the building, but we would all be together at least. Alas, he did not see the point! When in the rear gallery, you simple have to rely on your understanding of the organ and the building and sing along yourself! Another reason I like the organ in the front of the room with everything else.   bruce cornely o o o __________ o o o ago (dean) ohs o o __________ o o  
(back) Subject: Re: MIDI vs copyright From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com> Date: Fri, 23 Jan 1998 20:27:08 -0800   Thanks for the info - I will look for them when I pull the statute.   Glenda Sutton     ---------- > From: RSiegel920 <RSiegel920@aol.com> > To: pipechat@pipechat.org > Subject: Re: MIDI vs copyright > Date: Friday, January 23, 1998 3:31 AM > > re: copyright- there are some "suggested" standards re: fair use that were > prepared by an adivsory consortium of publishing interests and were published > as an appendix to the 1976 copyright act. These give some guidance concerning > Fair Use. There is also a specific exception for performance rights in > religious services so your don't have to rely on a First Amendment defense.    
(back) Subject: Re: Questions on How to Hook Up Conn Electric Pipes From: PipeLuvr <PipeLuvr@aol.com> Date: Fri, 23 Jan 1998 23:10:02 EST   In a message dated 98-01-23 14:10:36 EST, Greg writes:   > As I understand it, if I take 2 sets and run > > them in series and the other 2 sets and run them in series then run > these > SERIES sets in PARALLEL that will equal the "Ohmage" of the pipes that > will > be wired in placed of the console 6 x 9 that I'll disconnect (i.e. 8 + > 8 = > 16 8 + 8 = 16 16 / 2 = 8 ohms). Is this the correct way to do > this?   Greg: I used this setup on my 652 and it worked well, HOWEVER, I drove the setup with a surplus Leslie amplifier. I found that the wimpy amplifier in the console was not up to driving the pipes efficiently.   You might wish to contact Kevin Bateman at 1-800-457-4408 (Organ Service Company) as he is excellent on Conn organs and their applications.   Best of luck!   Bob  
(back) Subject: Tergiversating From: Kevin Cartwright <kevin1@alaweb.com> Date: Fri, 23 Jan 1998 22:21:25 -0600   Remember "tergiversating" from MFulk? I think I remember seeing some of you asking what it meant. I bought a COMPLETE dictionary to the English language a few months ago. I brought it out, and looked up this unsure word (pun intended).   ter.gi.ver.sate (ter' ji ver sat'), v.i., -sat.ed, -sat.ing. 1. to change repeatedly one's attitude or opinions with respect to a cause, subject, etc.;equivocate. 2. to turn renegade.   Other forms include: tergiversation (n), tergiversator or tergiversant (n), and tergiversatory (adj).   I know some of you probably knew already, but I thought I would send this anyway.   For now,   Kevin Cartwright kevin1@alaweb.com  
(back) Subject: How about this one? From: Kevin Cartwright <kevin1@alaweb.com> Date: Fri, 23 Jan 1998 22:28:19 -0600   I know this is unrelated, but it is not very long (well, one word is). Try pronouncing this word:   Pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis.   Anyway, it means: an obscure term ostensibly referring to a lung disease caused by silica dust, sometimes cited as one of the longest words in the English language.   For now,   Kevin Cartwright kevin1@alaweb.com  
(back) Subject: How about this one? From: "Judy A. Ollikkala" <71431.2534@compuserve.com> Date: Fri, 23 Jan 1998 23:44:24 -0500   I wonder if that long word beats this one, the name of a lake in Massachusetts? Lake Chaugoggagogmanchaugagogchaubunagungamaug. It means in Indian language "you fish on your side, I fish on my side and nobody fishes in the middle". Judy Ollikkala (not organ chat)   For organ chat I am wondering if pipe organ websites out of Canada have been disrupted by the ice storm there. Having trouble accessing these.  
(back) Subject: Re: PipeChat Digest #213 - 01/23/98 From: Jim Reinhart <jimrein@main.ismi.net> Date: Fri, 23 Jan 1998 23:53:53 -0500   Subject: Re: MIDI vs copyright From: CDKrug <CDKrug@aol.com> Date: Fri, 23 Jan 1998 00:02:53 EST   >Now consider this: Teachers may make those copies, but if the piece is >performed, every performer needs a legal copy.   What if some of the performers are performing from memory? Can they borrow another musician's copy long enough to learn the piece?   Can two or more musicians share a single (purchased) copy during the performance?   Puzzled, Jim R.    
(back) Subject: Re: PipeChat Digest #213 - 01/23/98 From: Kevin Cartwright <kevin1@alaweb.com> Date: Fri, 23 Jan 1998 23:03:43 -0600   Jim Reinhart wrote: > > Subject: Re: MIDI vs copyright > From: CDKrug <CDKrug@aol.com> > Date: Fri, 23 Jan 1998 00:02:53 EST > > >Now consider this: Teachers may make those copies, but if the piece is >performed, every performer needs a legal copy. > > What if some of the performers are performing from memory? Can they > borrow another musician's copy long enough to learn the piece? > > Can two or more musicians share a single (purchased) copy during the > performance? > > Puzzled, > Jim R. > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org   I buy a legal copy for everything I do, no matter if the church already has it or not. "If I don't have it, I don't have it."   Kevin Cartwright Greenville, Alabama kevin1@alaweb.com  
(back) Subject: Howard Goodall's Organ Works From: Duncan Charig <charigd@illawarra.starway.net.au> Date: Fri, 23 Jan 1998 22:28:54 +1100   Watching the third in the series of Howard Goodall's Organ Works, I = couldn't help but be hit by a wave of nostalgia as towards the end of = the programme he interviewed the latest descendant of the great Henry = Willis. The first organ I ever played was a Willis, as was the organ on = which I had my organ lessons.   The organ on which I used to practice was in a church that had been = damaged by a flying bomb towards the end of World War II. The church had = been restored, but at that time no work, other than tuning, had been = done on the organ, which still retained the a considerable amount of = dust and fine debris. It was a two manual organ, with a tracker action. = However when the Swell was coupled to the Great the action became so = heavy that a considerable amount of finger pressure was needed to play = the instrument. Over the time that I used that organ for practice I = developed very strong fingers and wrists. Something that I have retained = over the years. Organists that develop on organs with all electric = action, don't know what they are missing, or, thinking back to the hard = work organ practice involved in those days, do they?   Duncan Charig Part-time organist, Soldiers and Miners Church, Mt Kembla, Director, Kembla Correspondence College.    
(back) Subject: Re: MIDI vs copyright From: CDKrug <CDKrug@aol.com> Date: Sat, 24 Jan 1998 01:12:12 EST   In a message dated 98-01-23 13:41:33 EST, you write:   << I'm music director/pianist/conductor for a middle school production of "The Sound of Music." I have the piano/conductor score. The thing won't stay open without my breaking the spine of the book. We have paid the rental on the score and all royalties for all performances in this auditorium. Is it ok then for me to make a copy of the score to use for this production, since I already have rented one? >>   In this case, MO is go ahead, understanding that if you are an honest person, you will make sure that it is destroyed when you're through with it.   OTOH, you could buy it. I bought my copy at Colony in NYC for about $75, Of course, that was before it was in production for Broadway. . .   >> What about theatre organists? When I played, I would buy a copy of the music, and then arrange it for my performances. And I'm sure that's how most TO artists operate. Is the performance of that new arrangement of a copyrighted piece an infringement? >>   Most performing venues buy liscenses from ASCAP. Generally, its the responsibility of the venue, at least for restaurants and the like. Hence the spiffy ASCAP window stickers on so many restaurants with entertainment.   As for the arrangement--does it exist on paper? If you improvise from an outline sketched on a lead sheet probably not. I had a teacher who would improvise TO arrangements w/o notes from memory. If you write out an arrangement, I believe that's one of those cases where it's strictly speaking illegal, but you're unlikely to be proscecuted unless you try to sell copies.  
(back) Subject: Re: dual majors From: "o\r fiol" <fiol@bway.net> Date: Sat, 24 Jan 1998 03:53:01 -0600   Dear Karl,   Since everyone's thrwing in their two cents about your major and its future, let me say that I think many musicians take this music only road and then complain about not having enough work. It's very difficult to live exclusively from music these days because no matter how you slice it, there's less work for the rank and file musician than there was before so much recorded music and karaoke machines. So, musicians find themselves in the predicament of wanting to play very badly and not finding enough opportunities to do it, and what to they do? First, they start taking on work they don't like to pay the bills. In many cases, this first step sours the player to the stuff he really likes. Another solution is to become an academic either right after the undergrad work is through or later in life. I've heard many musicians regret this decision, citing the feelings they have to picking appart what they used to hold in mysterious awe.   So, I propose that if you want to have much control over what you play and what gigs you choose to take, you might want to delve into other professions and interests that you really love other than music, so that it never has to become a question of playing some horrible stuff to put food on the table. I have to point out, however, that many musicians opt to play music fulltime rather than split up their time and interests with other professions. These folks are by no means foolish or lovers of poverty; they are, instead, rare examples of committed people in a society that so often goes where the wind seems to be blowing.   Love, Orlandoe    
(back) Subject: Re: MIDI vs copyright From: "o\r fiol" <fiol@bway.net> Date: Sat, 24 Jan 1998 04:16:21 -0600   All this talk about copyright law inspires me to remind you guys why these laws were set forth in the first place. Modern copyright law is intended to protect miusicians against the constant efforts by record companies to deny royalties and rip musicians off for the immense effort they put into creating and/or performing music. We're talking here like we need to fear our brothers infringing on our preciously copyrighted work. With certain exceptions notwithstanding, I find musicians a pretty peaceful bunch when it comes to respecting the integrity and originality of the fellows' works. It's the record labels and concert promoters that want to use plagerism to make a quick buck.   Love, Orlando