PipeChat Digest #225 - Friday, January 30, 1998
 
These funny stories...
  by Kevin Cartwright <kevin1@alaweb.com>
Re: Upsetting the congregation
  by Kevin Cartwright <kevin1@alaweb.com>
TAO classified
  by Judy A. Ollikkala <71431.2534@compuserve.com>
Re: Upsetting the congregation
  by Glenda <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com>
Re: donut boy
  by Dr Edward Peterson <epeterso@madison.tdsnet.com>
Upsetting the congregation
  by j nathan <jnatpat@sunsix.infi.net>
Re: simple sketches of various pipe shapes/styles
  by Bob Loesch <rrloesch@jps.net>
Re: Upsetting the congregation
  by SteveL <SteveL@nycnet.com>
Re: T.O. Pipework facades?
  by Sean Haley <newgershwin@hotmail.com>
Re: Upsetting the congregation
  by Stephen F P Karr <karrlist@scescape.net>
Re: Upsetting the congregation
  by Otto Pebworth <opebwrth@gte.net>
Re: Upsetting [for Kevin M]
  by <ComposerTX@aol.com>
Re: Upsetting the congregation
  by Sean Haley <newgershwin@hotmail.com>
Re: simple sketches of various pipe shapes/styles
  by <ComposerTX@aol.com>
Re: donut boy
  by Ken <mewzishn@spec.net>
Test
  by BALD1 <BALD1@prodigy.net>
Re:  Test
  by <HDKarras@aol.com>
 


(back) Subject: These funny stories... From: Kevin Cartwright <kevin1@alaweb.com> Date: Thu, 29 Jan 1998 19:40:15 -0600   Hey,   These funny stories from the "Gameboy" subject are making me double over in laughter. But, the name Gameboy is kind of repulsive. In favor of changing the subject to something else, I'll offer another story (of two).   It was a number of years ago (back when I did not know anything about organs). We were about half way through the prayers of the people, the quietest moment of the service, and the organist was changing her music for the next hymn. Well, she was shifting the hymnbook, and it tipped off the music rack, and well, hit the swell, which was already prepared for the next hymn (LOUD), with a nice force. The noise quickly made everyone jump, and stopped the prayer. As she reached for it, she only helped it up the keyboard. As soon as the preacher's wife just started laughing (and snorting), my friend and I were the next to give in and laugh aloud. The preacher made some dumb joke about asking if we were awake after everything settled down, and then resumed the prayer asking for forgiveness of the incident.   Years later, I was playing my first prelude. It was very sucessful, absolutely NO mistakes (probably because I wrote it myself). So, my preference is full organ with all available sforzando ranks. The hyms do not require that much, so I was asked to set the stops for the first hymn and turn the sforzando off before leaving the console for that current organist to take over. I began pushing the sweat-covered piston (I was nervous, thus, sweaty) to turn it off. It turned off, but I also hit an F# on the way. It was a short tweak, but it completely embarassed me. Luckily, no one remembers it today. But, the next week the main organist had her turn, as she was hitting a preset piston, and did the same thing, but with the trompette 8' as the main stop, and she hit about three of four keys with her palm. We laughed about it later that day.   That's enough for now, I have other e-mails to write to other people.   For now,   Kevin Cartwright kevin1@alaweb.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Upsetting the congregation From: Kevin Cartwright <kevin1@alaweb.com> Date: Thu, 29 Jan 1998 19:50:37 -0600   Kevin.M.Simons-1 wrote: > > Howdy List, > > Another thing to throw into the fray. How do your congregations feel > about free harmonizations on the last verses of hymns? Do you do any > modulating? What about introductions or fanfares? Does this throw your > congregation or complain? > > BTW, thanks for the help on my Moeller question. I went to the church > today, and was able to set the pistons! Thanks, it made my practice > session much better! > > Kevin M. Simons > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org     My choir's cue to an upcoming variation is a short fanfare, or interlude, before that verse, usually the last one. This never throws off the audience, the director just stops directing, so they stop singing until they hear that hymn again. The choir likes that type of cue better than the neighboring church's "single-key method in the last two measures" for the variation announcement of a verse. Also, I don't like not using the pedals for variation, that's what the variation hymnbook is for. I'd rather use more pedal for variation.   Just an idea,   Kevin Cartwright kevin1@alaweb.com  
(back) Subject: TAO classified From: "Judy A. Ollikkala" <71431.2534@compuserve.com> Date: Thu, 29 Jan 1998 22:11:03 -0500   TAO, November 1997 Moller double artiste 1966 rebuilt and ready for installation -- $35,000. OBO Call for stoplist and specifications. 704-888-0454  
(back) Subject: Re: Upsetting the congregation From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com> Date: Thu, 29 Jan 1998 21:01:34 -0800   I find that my congregation really enjoy the hymns when I play and vary the harmonizations, as long as I don't get too wacky and wild about it, i.e., they can still readily identify the melody line. They seem to sing all the more loudly and vigorously. The more familiar and loved the hymn, the more liberties I take and, yes, I do variations and modulations, and on other than the last verses.   However, regarding fanfares, I have found that many times doing them as introductions confuse the congregation about when to "join in" - they need to be done with a healthy measure of forethought and some restraint.   Glenda Sutton    
(back) Subject: Re: donut boy From: epeterso@madison.tdsnet.com (Dr Edward Peterson) Date: Thu, 29 Jan 1998 22:40:36 -0500   On Thu, 29 Jan 1998 13:49:43 -0600 (CST), "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com> wrote: > This always worked fine until >Good Friday when there was of course no altar frontal. An entire church >full of people saw their organist crawling behind the altar holding a paper >bag full of donuts in his teeth ...   Now THAT'S hilarious!   E/  
(back) Subject: Upsetting the congregation From: j nathan <jnatpat@sunsix.infi.net> Date: Thu, 29 Jan 1998 21:48:09 -0600   This is an interesting thread, especially for someone such as myself, that serves two congregations on Sunday morning. At the nine o'clock service, which is Episcopalian, their feeling is "more is better"!! What ever I can do to inspire their feelings of worship is greatly appreciated and requested. The eleven o'clock service is United Methodist, and they seem to want more restraint from me... i.e.~ less embellished harmonies, more verses in straight harmony so "they can sing their parts", etc. The interesting thing, however, is that when we sing a hymn that has an especially moving text, I will address the congregation before the service, and explain what they will hear during the hymn, as I try to illumine the text with varied registrations or harmonies...and they sing better than ever! Interested in other approaches!   J Nathan Patton Organist/Choirmaster St. Peter's Episcopal First United Methodist Benton, Kentucky  
(back) Subject: Re: simple sketches of various pipe shapes/styles From: Bob Loesch <rrloesch@jps.net> Date: Thu, 29 Jan 1998 20:23:10 -0800   At 17:52 1/29/98 EST, ComposerTX@aol.com wrote: >Hi folks, > >Anyone have sketches in downloadable files of various pipe styles for >inclusion in an informative article for my church newsletter? I just   If you can get hold of either Audsley's 'Art of Organ Building' or Stevens Irwin's 'Dictionary of Pipe Organ Stops' you will have all the line drawings you need. Irwin used Audsleys drawings, so you don't have to find both...     Regards,   Bob        
(back) Subject: Re: Upsetting the congregation From: SteveL@nycnet.com (SteveL) Date: Thu, 29 Jan 1998 18:33:31 -0500   pipechat@pipechat.org,Internet writes: >I find that my congregation really enjoy the hymns when I play and vary >the >harmonizations, as long as I don't get too wacky and wild about it, >i.e., >they can still readily identify the melody line. They seem to sing all >the >more loudly and vigorously. The more familiar and loved the hymn, the >more >liberties I take and, yes, I do variations and modulations, and on other >than the last verses.   >However, regarding fanfares, I have found that many times doing them as >introductions confuse the congregation about when to "join in" - they >need >to be done with a healthy measure of forethought and some restraint.   >Glenda Sutton   Well said, Glenda, as always!   While I don't automatically do a free accompaniment on the last verse, I *do* look carefully at the text of the hymns and register and phrase accordingly. Now and then, I'll embellish the harmony with some unexpected chords, but try very carefully not to do anything to disuade the congregational singing. If I use a really wild free accompaniment, I'll enlist my boss (who's a fabulous organist) or the 12-year old "Sub-Organist" to solo out the melody (in the tenor octave) on an appropriate sound.   However, I *do* like to introduce the hymns in a creative way. In many cases, the bridge between the prelude and the opening hymn will become a modulated buildup with snippets of the tune, rather than playing the hymn all the way through. Sometimes, I'll use a chorale prelude -- those by David Cherwien and Paul Manz are often fabulous germs on which one can "take off" -- or do a fanfare or perhaps something in a French toccata style with c.f. in the pedals. Of course, one has to be careful if the choir is not within eyesight (as in a procession) and be sure to make it drop-dead obvious when it's time for everyone to start singing verse 1.   I think that service playing -- the hymns and choral accompaniments -- is the most important part of a church organist's art -- not the prelude and postlude -- and that we should be as creative and imaginitive as our talents and resources allow.   Steve Lawson - NYC                                                      
(back) Subject: Re: T.O. Pipework facades? From: "Sean Haley" <newgershwin@hotmail.com> Date: Thu, 29 Jan 1998 20:40:25 PST         > >> Anything behind swell shades whether glass or wood >>is not a facade, but pipes behind transparent swell shades. >~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ >Hey, At least you can see the pipes!   I suppose that is true. I will agree that seeing the pipes, even if in a chamber with transparent swell shades, does make the pipe organ a little more interesting, even if it is not a true facade.   Sean Haley   ______________________________________________________ Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Upsetting the congregation From: Stephen F P Karr <karrlist@scescape.net> Date: Thu, 29 Jan 1998 23:40:22 -0500 (EST)   >Another thing to throw into the fray. How do your congregations feel >about free harmonizations on the last verses of hymns? Do you do any >modulating? What about introductions or fanfares? Does this throw your >congregation or complain?   I usually do at least one free harmonization or transposition (really transposed, not using a knob) per service. The congregation seems to get into this with a great deal of enthusiasm. For modulations into higher keys, depending how far I am going up, I have different methods of getting there. For going up a whole step, I play the last chord of the verse in the manuals, and a whole step down in the pedals. Then, I go down another half-step in the pedal, and that is the root of the chord of the fifth of the new key. Then, I put in about half of the hymn in the new key. Going up half a step is a bit more complicated. What I did last Sunday (to get into the key for the Goemanne harmonization in the book) was to, on the last chord of the verse, take the pedals down a minor third to the relative minor key (using the passing tone in between, such as a-g#-f#), and hold the minor chord, then slide into the major chord half a step down from that, and that's the fifth once again, and you can play an interlude in the new key, and the congregation knows to come in, in the words of my teacher, "when you come to a crashing halt." It works beautifully for me at Bethlehem, and at St. Mary's Catholic on the few occasions I play there as a sub on Saturday nights.   _____ | |_____ | || |_____ |Stephen || |_____ ______|F.P. Karr| || |_____ ______ |o o || || || || || |_____ | o o| | o o||Student Organist || || |_____ |o o | |o o || || || || || || || | | o o| | o o||Organist and Director of Music, | |o o | |o o || Bethlehem Lutheran Church|| | | o o| | o o|| || || || || || || | |o o | |o o || Aiken, SC || || || || | | o o| | o o| \ / \ / \U/ \S/ \A/ \ / \ / |o o | |o o | V V V V V V V | o o| | o o|_____________________________________|o o | |o o || E E | E E E | E E | E E E | E E | || o o| | o o||_|_|_|_|_|_|_|_|_|_|_|_|_|_|_|_|_|_||o o |    
(back) Subject: Re: Upsetting the congregation From: Otto Pebworth <opebwrth@gte.net> Date: Thu, 29 Jan 1998 23:46:17 -0500   SteveL wrote: > > I think that service playing -- the hymns and choral accompaniments -- > is the most important part of a church organist's art -- not the > prelude and postlude -- and that we should be as creative and > imaginitive as our talents and resources allow. >     ---> Bravo, Steve! My organ teachers have taught me the same thing, and it *is* true; the hymns and choral accompaniments are the most important. I have also found that if you can get through the first hymn without any disasters, the congregation can/will forgive you for (almost) anything else that could happen during the service. :)   Otto  
(back) Subject: Re: Upsetting [for Kevin M] From: ComposerTX@aol.com Date: Thu, 29 Jan 1998 23:47:09 EST   I try to never surprise the congregation. My choir and congregation can see me in profile at the organ, and I always try to smile when I begin a fanfare, modulation, or reharmonization. It tells them that, at least to ME, everything is alright. <grin> Best of luck with your behemoth. Danny Ray ComposerTX  
(back) Subject: Re: Upsetting the congregation From: "Sean Haley" <newgershwin@hotmail.com> Date: Thu, 29 Jan 1998 21:05:38 PST   >I think that service playing -- the hymns and choral accompaniments - >is the most important part of a church organist's art -- not the >prelude and postlude -- and that we should be as creative and >imaginitive as our talents and resources allow. > >Steve Lawson - NYC   Well Said!!! Most people that play hymns and choral accompaniment well, will recognize even greater opportunities to show their skill in a prelude or postlude that may not otherwise be easy to do when playing hymns.   Sean Haley   ______________________________________________________ Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com  
(back) Subject: Re: simple sketches of various pipe shapes/styles From: ComposerTX@aol.com Date: Fri, 30 Jan 1998 00:04:51 EST   Bob, thanks for your help. I'll look for them Danny Ray ComposerTX  
(back) Subject: Re: donut boy From: Ken <mewzishn@spec.net> Date: Fri, 30 Jan 1998 00:45:49 +0000   Dr Edward Peterson wrote:   > <jlspeller@stlnet.com> wrote: > > This always worked fine until > >Good Friday when there was of course no altar frontal. An entire > church > >full of people saw their organist crawling behind the altar holding a > paper > >bag full of donuts in his teeth ...   The version I'd heard was of the organist who usually brought a little light snack to the console as the services ran back-to-back with little time between for more than a potty break, and his hypoglycemia would kick in without a little something to eat.   On this particular occasion he forgot to bring it, and during the second service was experiencing a little hunger pangs and feeling a little light-headed, so he crawled to the exit and went to get the snack as the sermon began. Upon his return, who knows, maybe it was the hunger, or the wooziness from low blood sugar, or just not thinking right, but he went back into the church by the wrong door, the one that led to the chancel area in front of the wooden barrier rather than the one behind, and started to crawl out. He didn't get more than a few feet, of course, before he (and everyone else) realized his error.   At least, that's the way I'd heard it told, it's one of those ones that circles around, like the one that everyone swears was told them by someone who actually witnessed it, about the minister/priest/rabbi who, in mid-service, has need of the facilities and forgets to turn off the wireless lavalier microphone.   Ken Sybesma        
(back) Subject: Test From: BALD1 <BALD1@prodigy.net> Date: Mon, 25 Aug 1997 11:02:49 -0500   I have lost my ability to send messages. If this goes out, please answer.   Thanks,   Jim H  
(back) Subject: Re: Test From: HDKarras@aol.com Date: Fri, 30 Jan 1998 04:24:58 EST   Hi, greetings from Braunschweig - your message receive here. Hans