PipeChat Digest #439 - Friday, July 3, 1998
 
Re: What a find!
  by "Bob Conway" <conwayb@post.queensu.ca>
Bach collections
  by "Dave Pitzer" <dpitzer@sonic.net>
Re: Bach collections
  by "bruce cornely" <cremona84000@webtv.net>
Re: Bach collections
  by "Thomas Haubrich" <haubt000@goofy.zdv.Uni-Mainz.de>
Re: Sine Nomine
  by "John F. Crowley" <jfjc@juno.com>
Re: Another one....
  by "John F. Crowley" <jfjc@juno.com>
Re: Organists in life
  by <DRAWKNOB@aol.com>
Re: Organists in life
  by <DRAWKNOB@aol.com>
Re: Another one....
  by "Shirley" <pnst@itw.com>
X-Post Concert Review
  by "Jonathan M Orwig" <giwro@juno.com>
Back in the land of the living (X-posted)
  by <ScottFop@aol.com>
Wurlitzer Theatre Poster Offer - Late 1970's
  by <PipeLuvr@aol.com>
Re: X-Post Concert Review
  by "bruce cornely" <cremona84000@webtv.net>
Re: X-Post Concert Review
  by "Jonathan M Orwig" <giwro@juno.com>
OHS Denver - Final Thoughts
  by <ManderUSA@aol.com>
 


(back) Subject: Re: What a find! From: Bob Conway <conwayb@post.queensu.ca> Date: Thu, 02 Jul 1998 20:32:02 -0400   To Bonnie Beth, Will, and all the others who still like locate old LPs!   The best bargain I ever had was in New York City when a store on Broadway decided that it was going to sell off all its LPs to make room for re-stocking with CDs. They were selling off the entire stock at $1.00 or less each, and I found brand-new Lps in boxed sets, of Montseratt Torrent, Virgil Fox, E. Power Biggs, Peter Hurford, and many others. I finished up by buying something like 150 new LPs for about $100.00.   You try talking that one through Canadian Customs!   I have also found many bargains in our local Goodwill Store here in Kingston, at 50 cents each, - though not, as a rule, organ LPs. I recently found some Heifetz Lps, and some of Arthur Rubenstein, - neither of which have made it to CDs as far as I can tell. I am able to play them over the air from time to time, but they stay in my own collection, - I am beginning to find difficulty in finding places at home where I can store them!   I got caught by letting all my old 78's go, and I am not going to make the same mistake twice!   Good Hunting!   Bob Conway <conwayb@post.queensu.ca> http://www.greenford.demon.co.uk/bob/   Classics Director CFRC-FM 101.9 MHz Radio Queen's University Kingston, Ontario, K7L 3N6 CANADA   At 07:31 PM 7/2/98 -0400, you wrote: >To Will, and seekers of old recordings, > >Unfortunately I was unable to attend the OHS Convention in Denver and >missed the lecture by Tom Murray. However, I can certainly understand the >great feeling that one gets upon finding a great old recording. I recently >bought 4 boxes of old LPs and found that they contained five LPs from `The >First International Congress of Organists' held in London, England, during >the summer of 1957. Also included: >14 volumes of `The King of Instruments' series; a number of Virgil Fox >LPs; two LPs of `Music for the Organ' from M.P. Moeller; Catherine Crozier >playing French Organ Music at Methuen; Organ Roll recordings by Lynwood >Farnam, Max Reger, and Eugene Gigout; a number of Richard Ellsasser LPs, >Clarence Watters LPs, E. Power Biggs recordings, and Louis Vierne playing >at Notre Dame - to name a few. All this, for $200! Yes indeed, what a >find! > >Regards, > >Bonnie Beth Derby >orge@dreamscape.com >---------- >From: W. Scarboro >Subject: What a find! > > > I was going through some old records today in a local thrift shop when I >came across volume 8 of the King of Instruments series put out by the >Aeolian-Skinner Company. This recording has Norman Coke-Jephcott playing >the organ at St. John the Divine in New York City. > > Sincerely, > > Will Scarboro > > >---------- > > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >  
(back) Subject: Bach collections From: Dave Pitzer <dpitzer@sonic.net> Date: Thu, 02 Jul 1998 18:19:48 -0700   All,   I don't contribute to this list often but the subject of "the best Bach collection" caught my interest. If it hasn't been discussed here recently (last year or so), I'd like to hear other's opinions.   I think that I have most of the currently available "complete" collections and several of the "semi-complete" collections. I have my favorite collection but it wins by only a very slim margin. In short, I'm glad that I can pick and choose on a per-composition basis.   And if the "best complete collection" is old and worn out, how about, say, the best recording of the 18 Leipzig Chorale Preludes?   David Pitzer California          
(back) Subject: Re: Bach collections From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Thu, 2 Jul 1998 21:38:49 -0400 (EDT)   Although not the complete 18, a recording of 11 them (BWV659-668 and canonic variations BWV769) comprises volume 2 of a set recorded at Holy Cross College, Worcester MA, on the Taylor and Boody Organ. Wofgang Rubsam plays these pieces very sensitively, although not quite as "sensitively" as the Art of the Fugue on the Duke Flentrop. Not only are the chorales well presented musically, but the organ is used beautifully. It is a magnificent instrument, and displays much color and variety.   o o o _____________________ o o o o o o _____bruce cornely_____ o o o o o o cremona84000@webtv.net o o o o o o ___ O a H g S o ___ o o o   All knowledge, the totality of all questions and all answers, is contained in the dog. --Franz Kafka    
(back) Subject: Re: Bach collections From: "Thomas Haubrich" <haubt000@goofy.zdv.Uni-Mainz.de> Date: Fri, 3 Jul 1998 03:37:36 +0200   >I don't contribute to this list often but the subject of "the best Bach >collection" caught my interest. If it hasn't been discussed here recently >(last year or so), I'd like to hear other's opinions. >I think that I have most of the currently available "complete" collections >and several of the "semi-complete" collections. I have my favorite >collection but it wins by only a very slim margin. In short, I'm glad that >I can pick and choose on a per-composition basis. >David Pitzer >California       Hi David and others!   For my personal taste, the new Bach complete organ edition, played by Ton Koopman at some of the most wonderful historical organs in Europe is my favourite. It's edited by Telarc, and reached Vol. 7 until yet, including most of the Preludes, Toccatas, Fantasias and Fugas, the Klavieruebeung, the Schueblers, the Leipziger chorales and Triosonatas.   As Koopmans wife, Tini Matoth, which is also his recording engineer, told me after a concert of the both, Volume 8 will be released in September or October, with the complete Orgelbuechlein on one CD, played at the historical Riepp organ(s?) at Ottobeuren.   Organs on Vol. 1-7 for examples: Hamburg St. Jacobi - Schnitger, Freiberg Dom -Silbermann, Amsterdam Waalse Kerk - Muller organ).   Koopman's playin' is absolutely exciting and musically, inspiring you to do as he does and to include more improvised ornaments than there are written out.   Besides these, the historical recordings with Helmut Walcha, made in the 50ies and 60ies by the Deutsche Grammophon, are also fascinating and musical. Also a nice performance, but I like the Koopman most.   Cheers   TombytheRhine        
(back) Subject: Re: Sine Nomine From: jfjc@juno.com (John F. Crowley) Date: Thu, 2 Jul 1998 21:18:06 -0500   I have done in the past for funerals the "Song of Farewell" (Some other titles to same music but different words: Praise God From Whom All Blessing Flow; For All Who Dwell beneath The Skies).   In the arragnement I use there are 4 verses. The first two are done in the key of F then I modulate to the key of G for the final two. Very effective.   John   _____________________________________________________________________ You don't need to buy Internet access to use free Internet e-mail. Get completely free e-mail from Juno at http://www.juno.com Or call Juno at (800) 654-JUNO [654-5866]  
(back) Subject: Re: Another one.... From: jfjc@juno.com (John F. Crowley) Date: Thu, 2 Jul 1998 21:13:15 -0500   To Messr DJB for one! It seems I heard you quite sometime ago while a very good friend of mine was still living. Rick had family living out in California and they would send him tapes of....Gee Dad, It's A Wurlitzer!   Woudst thou have any commercial recordings available, if so I would be most appreciative if you would kindly send info pertaining thereto.   Musically,   John F. Crowley   _____________________________________________________________________ You don't need to buy Internet access to use free Internet e-mail. Get completely free e-mail from Juno at http://www.juno.com Or call Juno at (800) 654-JUNO [654-5866]  
(back) Subject: Re: Organists in life From: <DRAWKNOB@aol.com> Date: Thu, 2 Jul 1998 22:39:59 EDT   In a message dated 7/2/98 12:24:13 PM Central Daylight Time, Shakehip@aol.com writes:   << Exactly, my point is, this is way off the topic... This is an organ discussion list... It has nothing to do with playing the organ... Let me put it less offensively. I'm an organist... I collect stamps... Can I discuss stamp collecting on this list because I'm an organist ? >> Ahh, but this thread does concern organs :-)  
(back) Subject: Re: Organists in life From: <DRAWKNOB@aol.com> Date: Thu, 2 Jul 1998 22:48:27 EDT   In a message dated 7/2/98 1:09:34 PM Central Daylight Time, danbel@earthlink.net writes:   << ><< Are there any online resources or surveys in regard to > organists as gay vs. straight? >> > >The better question would be: Who isn't? :-) > There are MANY organists who are NOT---FYI---don't assume---it will get you in trouble every time. djb >>   Thanks for the words of wisdom!  
(back) Subject: Re: Another one.... From: Shirley <pnst@itw.com> Date: Thu, 02 Jul 1998 22:52:22 -0400   At 08:30 PM 7/1/98 -0700, you wrote: >do you plan to play this song up-tempo? or will you >dirge it out =E1 la New Orleans? or will you simply accede to the occasion >and play it with a Love Story flair? Sounds like you've opted for the >last!     Yeah, I guess it was like Love Story.... no sobbing tibias, though.=20   Despite the fact that my skin was crawling the whole time I played it, it was quite effective. It was played at the end of the service, when the casket was going up the aisle, followed by the family.   --Shirley   ***********************************************************   A friend is someone who knows the song in your heart and sings it back to you when you have forgotten how it goes.   ************************************************************  
(back) Subject: X-Post Concert Review From: giwro@juno.com (Jonathan M Orwig) Date: Thu, 2 Jul 1998 20:53:55 -0700   Hi Lists,   Last night (7/2/98) I attended a recital at the Claremont Congregational UCC, the last this season of a series of dedicatory recitals. Performing last night was Canadian organist, Thomas Annand.   Program:   Toccata, Adagio & Fugue In C (JS Bach)   Vater Unser in Himmelreich (B"ohm)   Sonata #4 in Bb (Mendelssohn)   INTERMISSION   Sonata I (Hindemith)   Benedictus (Reger)   Introduction & Passacaglia (Reger)   ENCORE: Improvisation on "O Canada!" (yesterday was Canada Day!)   ****************   Mr. Annand started out rather tentatively (at least to this listener's ears) with the Bach - it never really moved me much, except the adagio, which was well played with plenty of feeling. I liked his treatment at the end of the Adagio - many players bring on full organ for the last section, Thomas used Principals 8' and 4' only (as far as I could tell with my ears and guessing at which knobs I saw pulled out!). I felt the quieter bridge was a better lead-in to the Fugue than the usual bombasticty... but then the Fugue didn't "dance" quite like I like to hear it...   The B"ohm was a nice contrast, C.F. on the Positiv Cornet accompanied by flutes on the GT, but my interest started to lag (lack of sleep, not poor performance!)   I looked forward to the Mendelssohn, and settled back for several minutes of really fine playing, marred only by a few small "clams" on the performer's part. In his defense, I have played this instrument, and the action is VERY sensitive - brush a key on the way from Pos. to GT. and you'll regret it! Nice registration on the Andante - Thomas really liked the Rohrflute and Flute Harmonique on the GT, as he used them several times during the recital...   After the intermission, Mr. Annand settled down to some awesome music making. I think he was a bit nervous during the first half - I could see his fingers shaking... (as an aside, the media staff had several cameras on the performer, and we were treated to nice views of his pedal solo in the Bach, and a good view of his hands, all projected for us to see clearly. Great idea anywhere the venue makes it difficult to see the performer) I have never really been a fan of the Hindemith #1, preferring the 2nd sonata of his 3, but Thomas gave a convincing rendition.   Mr. Annand really came into his element with the Reger "Benedictus", playing with great emotion and sensitivity. My method of judging the effectiveness of a performer is whether or not I catch myself holding my breath... lost in the music... Yup. He had me - hook. line and sinker! Bravo, Maestro Annand!   After that winsome moment, we were treated to the fiery Introduction & Passacaglia in D min - a rendition that was truly virtuosic without being overdone. After 2 calls back out, our artist settled down once more and gave us an encore - an improvisation on "O Canada", ending (finally) with full organ for the only time that evening! Sure was nice to hear someone play a recital without using the chamade and full organ in every piece!   Cheers,   Jonathan Orwig Minister of Music - Bethany Church, Redlands, CA for new Organ, Keyboard & Choral Music visit Evensong Music at: http://members.aol.com/Evnsong/pgone.html Personal Page: http://members.aol.com/Giwro/index.html   _____________________________________________________________________ You don't need to buy Internet access to use free Internet e-mail. Get completely free e-mail from Juno at http://www.juno.com Or call Juno at (800) 654-JUNO [654-5866]  
(back) Subject: Back in the land of the living (X-posted) From: <ScottFop@aol.com> Date: Fri, 3 Jul 1998 00:00:42 EDT   I have arrived in Royal Oak, MI to begin my new position and have begun unpacking (UGH!) the house and office. Since I have been gone this is the first time in 8 days I have been able to use my computer since it is now out of it's little box.   Anyone wishing address/phone information- please email privately.   Thanks-   Scott Foppiano (Ah- the sounds of 100 ranks of Symphonic Kilgen!)  
(back) Subject: Wurlitzer Theatre Poster Offer - Late 1970's From: <PipeLuvr@aol.com> Date: Fri, 3 Jul 1998 00:02:52 EDT   Hi List:   Does anyone know where one of "The Mighty Wurlitzer" posters published by the Wurlitzer company could be obtained? According to a 1977 Theatre Organ Magazine adverstisement, at that time they were available from the company for $3.00 and I wonder if anyone knows if they are still available.   Thanks!   Bob Acker pipeluvr@aol.com  
(back) Subject: Re: X-Post Concert Review From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Fri, 3 Jul 1998 00:38:34 -0400 (EDT)   Jonathan, Where is Claremont UCC (duh, hope it ain't Claremont!). Your review was great. Can you remember much particularly about the organ?   o o o _____________________ o o o o o o _____bruce cornely_____ o o o o o o cremona84000@webtv.net o o o o o o ___ O a H g S o ___ o o o   All knowledge, the totality of all questions and all answers, is contained in the dog. --Franz Kafka    
(back) Subject: Re: X-Post Concert Review From: giwro@juno.com (Jonathan M Orwig) Date: Thu, 2 Jul 1998 22:44:12 -0700     On Fri, 3 Jul 1998 00:38:34 -0400 (EDT) cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) writes: >Jonathan, >Where is Claremont UCC (duh, hope it ain't Claremont!). Your review >was great. Can you remember much particularly about the organ?   Claremont, CA (about 20-30 mi east of L.A.)   Glatter-Götz III/78 tracker - yummy to the extreme. Prompt speech without the spitting & chuffing of the Orgelbewewewewegung era, eclectic (and large enough) to pull off most any genre, but still retaining a personality! Warm foundations, hair-raising SW reeds, piquant clarinet-like krummhorn on the Positif, assertive (but not overbearing) glory-horn, etc,etc.   In short, what an irreverent wag once called an "eargasm" (sorry, couldn't resist!)   This is the organ I take lessons on - you know, the one that converted me to Trackerism ;-) There are some photos on my website (albeit not labeled) as well as photos and stoplist on the builder's site at: http://www.gg-organs.com/new/proj/pr_frame.htm Click on the word "Claremont"   BTW, how are you coming on learning my fugue? Did you play thru the choral stuff yet... I'm curious to get reactions on it...   Cheers,   Jonathan Evensong Music at: http://members.aol.com/Evnsong/pgone.html Personal Page: http://members.aol.com/Giwro/index.html   _____________________________________________________________________ You don't need to buy Internet access to use free Internet e-mail. Get completely free e-mail from Juno at http://www.juno.com Or call Juno at (800) 654-JUNO [654-5866]  
(back) Subject: OHS Denver - Final Thoughts From: <ManderUSA@aol.com> Date: Fri, 3 Jul 1998 02:07:59 EDT   Dear Lists,   Thank you for kind responses to my attempts to bring to the stay-at-homes some of the flavor of an OHS convention. I have been attending OHS convention on and off since one way back in the early 60s, possibly 1960 itself, in Portland, Maine. For a long time, it was mostly "off," but in recent years, it has been mostly "on," and I have come to realize how important are these yearly gatherings. Last year, in Portland, OR, armed with a laptop, and in my first year on PipOrg-L, I realized that many on that mailing list would be keen to learn in some detail about a conference tightly-packed with an impressive array of instruments, new and old, and a huge amount of organ music of many styles and periods. With some trepidation, I resolved to take on the task of getting the word out, and ended up enjoying the experience. I just assumed that I would do it again this year, so there I was at the back of the bus, getting it all filed away as long as battery life would let me, and then hunting around at the beginning of the next recital for a seat near a possible plug, to steal a bit of Methodist or Roman Catholic or Episcopalian juice to charge me up for the next bus journey. This year, I even got some Zen and Masonic juice - it seemed to work every bit as well as that of the mainline churches.   Obviously, each year's gathering takes on the flavor of its city, and of that city's organ history. Portland was full of new or new-ish instruments, some built by builders whose work I had heard lots about, but had not heard before. Denver is full of historic instruments of great worth, well loved and preserved, works of builders not so much part of the experience of an Easterner like myself. We heard a great work of Kimball, another of Frank Roosevelt, and two Welte instruments, revelations all. We met three works of Charles Anderson, a Denver builder, represented by three instruments. And who could forget the Paramount WurliTzer? In each city, there are the people who live there, who slave for years even, to make the convention happen for those of us who visit, all for no compensation other than the great satisfaction of giving convention goers the best possible experience of their home town, and its organ riches. We came to know some of these people as friends in the course of the week: Mike Rowe, Convention Chairman, introduced each of the concert artists; Vern West (owner of a vast uniform collection, some of which he revealed to us each succeeding day) saw to it that the busses rolled on time; James Mosby Bratton, program chairman, who set the consistently splendid musical tone for the convention, and contributed to that himself in two concerts; and a person I did not meet, Larry Burt, who was responsible for, and gets full marks for, the meals served at this convention. An OHS convention is a bit different from big brother, in that most meals are included in the convention fee (as is transportation). Sumptuous feasts are not the order of the day, although we did have a couple of those, but rather simple and wholesome food, sometimes in church dining rooms, served by church members. All of the above concerns, program, food, transportation, housing - all of it runs so smoothly that no one needs to be concerned about any of it. It just happens - count on it! And this is a great tribute to those mentioned above, and others I might have missed. I hope they are getting lots of rest now, as they certainly had none last week!   Something I know little about, other than to know that it happens, concerns the health of some of the old instruments we hear. An OHS convention coming to town can sometimes be very good news to some of the churches visited. Where there are old instruments of merit that are in mechanical trouble, or that may not be playing at all, there is usually a crew of builders, not always local, either, who appear and do whatever it takes. I am not sure how much this had to happen in Denver (other than knowing that Norman Lane and Morel Associates from Denver pitched in a great deal), but I do know that in Baltimore, where I was living at the time of the last convention there, there were many churches with instruments that had not played, or played reliably for a long time. They were all got in playing shape by a remarkable army of volunteers, some of whom travelled a great distance to get there, some over a period of weeks. There were two instances of this of which I was personally aware, in churches that had no idea they had a pipe organ that could ever play again, and were using plug ins. I saw genuine happy tears on the cheeks of parishioners in two places, thrilled with the discovery or rediscovery of a wonderful sound, and also thrilled to see their churches packed with several hundred people who came to admire, and also raised the roof with their singing.   But we are mainly musicians, and while we are in varying degrees concerned with organ history, the music and musicians we hear each year, some new, some regulars, set a most important part of the tone of the overall experience. We all have our favorites - no one is ever less than excellent. High points for me this year: Donald Pearson and John Repulski at St. John's Cathedral; Peter Sykes at Trinity UMC; Grant Edwards at First Presbyterian Church, Leadville (two miles high!); James Mosby Bratton at Annunciation R. C. Church, playing the Mustel Harmonium, with friends; Thomas Murray at St. John's Cathedral; Paul Fleckenstein, the ultimate showman, at Memorial Hall in Pueblo; Joseph Galema's performance with two trumpet players of the John Gardner "Sonata de Chiesa sopra una tema di Claudio Monteverdi" in the Protestant Chapel at the Air Force Academy; Bob Castle accompanying the silent film White Desert at the Paramount; Tom Brown's playing of some splendid English pieces on the Welte organ on the Welte Organ at Grace and St. Stephen's, Colorado Springs. Everything was so very good, but these are special memories for me. Others will want to add theirs.   And, there are the "convention friendships." Each year, on day one, there is the scene in the hotel lobby, the greeting of warm friends seen each year only at these gatherings, but good friends nonetheless. How quickly one slips back into the happy familiarity with these people from the far reaches of the country, with only this annual seven or eight day get-together. These are relatively intimate conventions, this year bringing together something between 250 and 300 people. The ones on the East Coast tend to draw a bit better, because of the larger population base, but it's a very manageable size, requiring this year six busses, and making food service relatively quick and easy, and encouraging better the making of friends. May I also commend to your attention the annual "Organ Handbook," something of a editorial triumph we possibly take too much for granted. In there, you will find a picture of every artist and every instrument, the complete printed program played, and the history and stoplist of the organ. Alan Laufman produces this wonder each year, somehow managing to gather together everyone's program and photograph, photographs of the organs, and stoplists in a far away place. As an entusiastic owner of three dogs, I feel compelled to tell you that the proof- reading, done by a cat this year, was perhaps not up to the usual standard. On page 117 of the book, you will see a picture of said cat engaging in this very activity. I have thought to offer the services of my most literary dog for next year, and will be observing closely to see which one actually is the most literary. They are "home schooled!" This Organ Handbook is, of course, given to each attendee, but is also mailed to the entire OHS membership, and is also sold to others through the catalogue. Next year's great challenge will be the requirement that the book appear in both English and French! If the pattern of previous years holds, there will be, sometime down the line, a CD of the organs of Denver, with recorded performances from this year's convention. When it is on offer, do get it. I will certainly be at the head of the line. Some of the material will appear earlier on Pipedreams as well. Ed Kelley is, as always, the excellent recording engineer.   Dare I add to this summary of convention wonders the grand natural beauty of the State of Colorado. Of course - why not? Being surrounded by snow-capped mountains all the time is somehow uplifting in itself. So is the gentle and dry climate we experienced.   If this sounds a bit like a commercial, I suppose it is. I know Montreal well enough to suggest that OHS convention magic applied to that city and the surrounding area should not be missed. I don't have the dates with me, but it is in August, and you will hear here exactly when.   May I also remind you to check out David Scribner's website, combining my bits of writing with some pictures he took at various points in the convention. It's a really well-done online magazine - have a look. The URL is: < www.ohs-florida.org/conv98 >.   Until next year, I remain your faithful reporter,   Malcolm Wechsler