PipeChat Digest #454 - Thursday, July 16, 1998
 
Lack of Interest
  by "robert.cowley" <robert.cowley@MCI2000.com>
An error I need to correct (BEWARE!)
  by "Richard Schneider" <arpncorn@davesworld.net>
Re: Lack of Interest
  by <PipeLuvr@aol.com>
Re: Lack of Interest
  by "bruce cornely" <cremona84000@webtv.net>
Re: Lack of Interest
  by "bruce cornely" <cremona84000@webtv.net>
Re: Lack of Interest
  by "John (Jack) Cormack" <jackjack@erols.com>
Re: Newbie full of questions re: theatre vs. classical
  by "Robert Horton" <r-horton@nwu.edu>
Jean Costa, organist, at St. John's Church, Luneburg.
  by "Bob Conway" <conwayb@post.queensu.ca>
new sounds for Roland-XP80
  by "bruce cornely" <cremona84000@webtv.net>
Estey Organ Giveaway (X-Posted)
  by "Richard Schneider" <arpncorn@davesworld.net>
Re: new sounds for Roland-XP80
  by "George Husson" <george_husson@hotmail.com>
Re: new sounds for Roland-XP80
  by "bruce cornely" <cremona84000@webtv.net>
Re: Lack of Interest
  by <Prestant16@aol.com>
 


(back) Subject: Lack of Interest From: "robert.cowley" <robert.cowley@MCI2000.com> Date: Wed, 15 Jul 1998 08:42:11 -0400   Last evening, St. John's Lutheran Church here in Springfield, Ohio, presented a special "free" program for people interested in the Pipe Organ. This program was for anyone, even if they played an instrument or not. It was designed to explain how and where the Pipe Organ came from and it's workings along with the different sounds which the organ could make. This program had been put together since last January when the planning stages first started.   Time of the program was for 7:00 PM. By 7:30 PM, NO ONE had shown up, despite much advertising in the Church News letters, Sunday Bulletins, and the Local Newspaper.   It is now quite apparent that very few people have any interest what-so-ever with the pipe organ in today's world. I really don't find this hard to believe, giving the problems of Church's finding organists. We here in Springfield have two Church's looking for organists while one Church only has music three Sundays out of the month due to the organist having to be at her full-time job and opening the store on that one Sunday.   Wittenberg University, located here in Springfield, had at one time, a wonderful music program for Organists, but no more. Several years ago, they dropped the organ program, due to lack of interest and very few students. I can understand why this happened. If a student pays $20k per year for a four year degree and only finds a job that pays $8k per year, who in their right mind would be willing to do that? Many Church's around this area, cannot pay high money for organists. Other bills must be paid in order for the Church to keep the doors open.   Having recently visited my old "Home Grounds" back in Pa., many organists back there also tell the same story. The Harrisburg area also has a lack of organists, along with many other towns north of there. One organist has two Church's in which she plays, one service at 8:00 am in one and another at 10:30 in the other Church, all for a grand total of $10k per year. One of the largest Methodist Churches uses a piano when the organist is on vacation. Again, two other churches, in that same town, are looking for someone to play the organ. The list goes on and on!   Something has to be done in order to correct this problem, but what? At this time, the organist has already been replaced by "Tape Decks", "CD's", MIDI playback systems, etc. etc. Where does it all end and who do we, as organists, blame? I believe the answer to that is "Ourselves"! We, as organists, have become: (1) overbearing, (2) too high class, (3) snobs, (4) do what we want and not what the Church wants, (5) etc. etc. etc. I know of one organist, when approached by the committee for continuously playing too loud, told the committee: "I'm the organist here and I'll play as loud as I want!" Needless to say, she's not playing at that Church anymore. To quote Pogo: "We have found the enemy and the enemy is us". How true those words are!   I believe that most of the problems are "fixable", but not overnight. We all need to find some common ground to work from and attempt to correct these problems fast, before it's too late. We also need to bring in more younger people to train in the musical field as organists. Just how to gain the interest is another question.   Any thoughts or ideas from others?     Bob Cowley Organist/Music Director St. John's Lutheran Church  
(back) Subject: An error I need to correct (BEWARE!) From: Richard Schneider <arpncorn@davesworld.net> Date: Wed, 15 Jul 1998 08:18:33 -0700   Subject: Re: Newbie full of questions re: theatre vs. classical Tue, 14 Jul 1998 23:37:39 EDT Phil L <ORGANUT@aol.com> wrote:     >. . .an error I need to correct. I kept using DO in place of direct > electric. How the hell I get DO for DE escapes me.   Folks,   Let me suggest that when you speak of this action "generically" [that is to say: not SPECIFICALLY speaking of the Direct Electric (R), which is a patented action of the Wicks Organ Company of Highland, IL], that you use the Industry-accepted generic term of "Electro-Mechanical".   While I don't personally care one way or another, the good folks at Wicks really do, and have been known to litigate when the use of their action name is used generically in reference to any other but their actions.   At least, you've been warned.   Faithfully, / ^ ^ \ { (O) (O) } --------oOOOo--------U-------oOOOo------------     "Arp" in the "Corn Patch"   Richard Schneider, President SCHNEIDER PIPE ORGANS, Inc. Organbuilders 41-43 Johnston Street Post Office Box 137 Kenney, IL 61749-0137 (217) 944-2454 VOX (217) 944-2527 FAX mailto:arpncorn@davesworld.net EMAIL (Note change in ISP's Domain-Name!)  
(back) Subject: Re: Lack of Interest From: <PipeLuvr@aol.com> Date: Wed, 15 Jul 1998 09:24:30 EDT   In a message dated 7/15/98 7:46:12 AM Central Daylight Time, robert.cowley@MCI2000.com writes:   > We, as > organists, have become: (1) overbearing, (2) too high class, (3) snobs, (4) > do what we want and not what the Church wants, (5) etc. etc. etc. > I know of one organist, when approached by the committee for continuously > playing too loud, told the committee: "I'm the organist here and I'll play > as loud as I want!" Needless to say, she's not playing at that Church > anymore. To quote Pogo: "We have found the enemy and the enemy is us". How > true those words are!   Amen and Amen!   Best wishes,   Bob Acker Allen, TX  
(back) Subject: Re: Lack of Interest From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Wed, 15 Jul 1998 12:51:54 -0400 (EDT)   Bob, I sympathize with your program for no one! I've played several recitals for the same group. I have found that people seem to be immune to music in general now, since it is everywhere constantly. However, to address the issue we must all do our best to be true ambassadors or even missionaries for our instrument. You might try doing your program immediately after church, and making it in several short sections. Inviting other instrumentalists to participate and play with the organ might also help, hopefully drawing their families and friends as well. I have started playing piano literature as postludes, and the familiarity has attracted several youngsters who play those pieces on the piano. It is indeed strange that, in a world where people play their stereos at full tilt and many cars literally rattle and thump down the streets, that people complain about the volume of the organ. But, regardless of the reason, it is reality. I have very consciously reduced the volume of the organ, using more foundation and color wherever possible. Granted, sometimes I can't hear the postlude for the talking, but at least they are not running for the doors with their hands over their ears! Some do stay to listen AND talk. It is a slow process of reintroducing the organ to the public, and hopefully the pendulum is just swinging. I look forward to others suggestions.   :~+~:~+~:~+~:~+~:~+~:~+~:~+~:~+~:~+~: o o o _____bruce cornely_____ o o o o o o cremona84000@webtv.net o o o o o o ___ O a H g S o ___ o o o   He wa'n't no common dog, he wa'n't no mongrel; he was a composite. A composite dog is a dog that's made up of all the valuable qualities that's in the dog breed-- kind of a syndicate; and a mongrel's made up of all the riffraff that's left over." --Mark Twain    
(back) Subject: Re: Lack of Interest From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Wed, 15 Jul 1998 13:01:58 -0400 (EDT)     >We, as=A0=A0organists, have become: (1) > overbearing, (2) too high class, (3) snobs, (4) > do what we want and not what the Church > wants, (5) etc. etc. etc.   >To quote Pogo: "We have found the enemy > and the enemy is us". How true those words >are!   >Bob Acker responds: >Amen and Amen!   I really don't mean to be overly sensitive, but this response really hurt and angers me! I don't like being lumped into this category; not to mention the number of people I know who are friendly and accommodating to non-organists and non-musicians. This is not a helpful comment. If we are really going to make some headway in this regard we must not only be kind to our listeners, but to each other as well. This condescension and holier-than-thou attitude should stop, or at least be kept to oneself! It really rumples my cotta when lurkers only come out to snipe!   :~+~:~+~:~+~:~+~:~+~:~+~:~+~:~+~:~+~: o o o _____bruce cornely_____ o o o o o o cremona84000@webtv.net o o o o o o ___ O a H g S o ___ o o o   He wa'n't no common dog, he wa'n't no mongrel; he was a composite. A composite dog is a dog that's made up of all the valuable qualities that's in the dog breed-- kind of a syndicate; and a mongrel's made up of all the riffraff that's left over." --Mark Twain    
(back) Subject: Re: Lack of Interest From: "John (Jack) Cormack" <jackjack@erols.com> Date: Wed, 15 Jul 1998 13:15:56 -0700   At 12:51 PM 7/15/98 -0400, you wrote: >Bob, >I sympathize with your program for no one! I've played several recitals >for the same group. I have found that people seem to be immune to >music in general now, since it is everywhere constantly. However, to >address the issue we must all do our best to be true ambassadors or even >missionaries for our instrument. You might try doing your program >immediately after church, and making it in several short sections. >Inviting other instrumentalists to participate and play with the organ >might also help, hopefully drawing their families and friends as well. >I have started playing piano literature as postludes, and the >familiarity has attracted several youngsters who play those pieces on >the piano. >It is indeed strange that, in a world where people play their stereos at >full tilt and many cars literally rattle and thump down the streets, >that people complain about the volume of the organ. But, regardless of >the reason, it is reality. I have very consciously reduced the volume >of the organ, using more foundation and color wherever possible. >Granted, sometimes I can't hear the postlude for the talking, but at >least they are not running for the doors with their hands over their >ears! Some do stay to listen AND talk. It is a slow process of >reintroducing the organ to the public, and hopefully the pendulum is >just swinging. I look forward to others suggestions. > > :~+~:~+~:~+~:~+~:~+~:~+~:~+~:~+~:~+~: > o o o _____bruce cornely_____ o o o > o o o cremona84000@webtv.net o o o > o o o ___ O a H g S o ___ o o o > ********************************************************   I suspect that the problem is basic to the lack of music education in our schools. There is also, I believe, a similar lack of interest in symphony orchestras, operas, and other "good music". The amazing quantity of rock, distorted guitar, and relatively unskilled but highly popular musicians that clog the airways with their music is a symptom of the lack of musical knowledge by the vast majority of listeners. I suspect that if there were a program to explain the workings of a piano, violin, oboe, or any other classical instrument, that the attendance would likewise be zero, or near zero. But if some rock star would present a seminar on methods of playing rock music, I suspect that the place would be mobbed!   I'll now get off of my soap box.   Sincerely,   Jack Cormack Potomac, Maryland  
(back) Subject: Re: Newbie full of questions re: theatre vs. classical From: Robert Horton <r-horton@nwu.edu> Date: Wed, 15 Jul 1998 14:20:06 -0500   >From: Mike Langford <mike5@indian-creek.net> >Date: Tue, 14 Jul 1998 14:16:16 EST >I'd also like to have some input on theatre voicing vs classical. Is the >main difference in the instruments voicing, wind and trems? I can't speak to voicing, but TOs are usually on at least four times the wind of a classical or church organ. TO trems are also slightly different. TO trems shake the wind inside the chest, while classical trems shake the reservoir wind.   >Are the same >basic pipe designs used for both? Yes, with one major exception...the Diaphone. TOs use a valvular reed stop called a Diaphone or Diaphonic Diapason. From what I can gather, it's especially useful in low registers because of its quick speech.   >I seem to see more data now on direct electric action whereas the last time >I was inside a chest, read some years ago, d.e. was a Wicks phenomenon only >and then looked at askance. Is there a place in theatre organs for d.e. >action or does the higher w.p. preclude its use? Higher wind pressure would mean that you need a stronger magnet, which in turn means that you have to worry more about arcing and burnout. With one exception (by Dobson), I've never seen anything using DE that wasn't by Wicks.   RH   Robert Horton, Organist 1726 Sherman Ave, Evanston, IL 60201 tel.847.424.1733 http://pubweb.nwu.edu/~rch507/ Q. How many harpsichordists does it take to change a light bulb? A. Five...one to change the bulb and four to complain that he's not using the appropriate baroque wattage.  
(back) Subject: Jean Costa, organist, at St. John's Church, Luneburg. From: Bob Conway <conwayb@post.queensu.ca> Date: Wed, 15 Jul 1998 16:56:37 -0400   Today, in our local Goodwill Store, I found a two LP set of Jean Costa playing pre-Bach German Organ Music. The Label is Barclay Classic 1+1 and the set number is 25009. The LPs are stereo so it is likely that they were recorded some time in the 1960's .   The discs are in very good condition, but the sleeve notes are sparse, to say the least! In order to use these LPs in some future radio programme, I would like some further information on both the Organist, and the Organ.   I have not come across the name of Jean Costa before, - is he well known to any of our European friends? Does anyone have any biographical information on him?   The organ is only mentioned by its location, with no further details, and I have no other information on this instrument in my collection of organ specifications. Does any one know who built it, and what its specification might be.   The minimal sleeve notes do say that Georg Bohm (1661-1733) was organist at St. John's Church, Luneburg, when the teenaged Bach was attending school there, - but I doubt that the organ as recorded is the one that Bach may have heard!   Any background material on these topics would be most gratefully appreciated.   Bob Conway <conwayb@post.queensu.ca> http://www.greenford.demon.co.uk/bob/   Classics Director CFRC-FM 101.9 MHz Radio Queen's University Kingston, Ontario, K7L 3N6 CANADA        
(back) Subject: new sounds for Roland-XP80 From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Wed, 15 Jul 1998 19:17:18 -0400 (EDT)   I am blessed with a Roland XP-80 keyboard in my office. The Lowery Parade in the chapel has unfortunately has been callled to that great organ chamber deep in the...... well, it doesn't work any more. Anyway, I was wondering if there is some program, disc, whatever, that I could get to elicit some "traditional" sounds from this thing. I heard a Rodgers keyboard once that had a pleasant principal and gedeckt sound. Is this possible??? Thanky!   :~+~:~+~:~+~:~+~:~+~:~+~:~+~:~+~:~+~: o o o _____bruce cornely_____ o o o o o o cremona84000@webtv.net o o o o o o ___ O a H g S o ___ o o o   He wa'n't no common dog, he wa'n't no mongrel; he was a composite. A composite dog is a dog that's made up of all the valuable qualities that's in the dog breed-- kind of a syndicate; and a mongrel's made up of all the riffraff that's left over." --Mark Twain    
(back) Subject: Estey Organ Giveaway (X-Posted) From: Richard Schneider <arpncorn@davesworld.net> Date: Wed, 15 Jul 1998 21:57:02 -0700   Dear Listers:   I am doing a favor for a dear friend, Art Thompson in Oregon, who has a pipe organ that he is interested in finding a new home for. He had several possibilities worked out and they have all fallen through.   Time is of the essence, and I'd ask you to contact him directly regarding this at mailto:artkt@multnomah.edu He has a Web-site which you can visit and view the instrument at:   http://www.multnomah.edu/estey   Thanks in advance for any assistance you can render!   Faithfully, / ^ ^ \ { (O) (O) } --------oOOOo--------U-------oOOOo------------   "Arp" in the "Corn Patch" Richard Schneider, President SCHNEIDER PIPE ORGANS, Inc. Organbuilders 41-43 Johnston Street Post Office Box 137 Kenney, IL 61749-0137 (217) 944-2454 VOX (217) 944-2527 FAX mailto:arpncorn@davesworld.net EMAIL (Note change in ISP's Domain-Name!)  
(back) Subject: Re: new sounds for Roland-XP80 From: "George Husson" <george_husson@hotmail.com> Date: Wed, 15 Jul 1998 20:52:20 PDT   When you say "traditional," I'm guessing you mean like nearly-real organ sounds, right? I have the same problem with my Korg i1. It is a great synthesizer in most respects (just found out I can't program a soft and/or sostenuto pedal on it--yikes) but its organ sounds are pretty limited. I think it just offers its flavor on the MIDI standard organ sounds.   I can relate to your mention of the Rodgers thing -- it's a W50. I found one and carry it back and forth between home and church when necessary. It has some lovely sampled pipe organ sounds and works really well. That doesn't help you, however, unless you can find one on the cheap.   Seems those synthesizer makers just about forgot about us organ types. Always enjoy your posts.   --George   ----Original Message Follows---- From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Wed, 15 Jul 1998 19:17:18 -0400 (EDT) To: pipechat@pipechat.org Subject: new sounds for Roland-XP80 Reply-To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org>   I am blessed with a Roland XP-80 keyboard in my office. The Lowery Parade in the chapel has unfortunately has been callled to that great organ chamber deep in the...... well, it doesn't work any more. Anyway, I was wondering if there is some program, disc, whatever, that I could get to elicit some "traditional" sounds from this thing. I heard a Rodgers keyboard once that had a pleasant principal and gedeckt sound. Is this possible??? Thanky!   :~+~:~+~:~+~:~+~:~+~:~+~:~+~:~+~:~+~: o o o _____bruce cornely_____ o o o o o o cremona84000@webtv.net o o o o o o ___ O a H g S o ___ o o o   He wa'n't no common dog, he wa'n't no mongrel; he was a composite. A composite dog is a dog that's made up of all the valuable qualities that's in the dog breed-- kind of a syndicate; and a mongrel's made up of all the riffraff that's left over." --Mark Twain     "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org         ______________________________________________________ Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com  
(back) Subject: Re: new sounds for Roland-XP80 From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Wed, 15 Jul 1998 23:56:46 -0400 (EDT)   Thanks for your help, George. I'll snoop around for one of these Rodgers things. Even that is better than the Lowery Parade! '-))   :~+~:~+~:~+~:~+~:~+~:~+~:~+~:~+~:~+~: o o o _____bruce cornely_____ o o o o o o cremona84000@webtv.net o o o o o o ___ O a H g S o ___ o o o   He wa'n't no common dog, he wa'n't no mongrel; he was a composite. A composite dog is a dog that's made up of all the valuable qualities that's in the dog breed-- kind of a syndicate; and a mongrel's made up of all the riffraff that's left over." --Mark Twain    
(back) Subject: Re: Lack of Interest From: <Prestant16@aol.com> Date: Thu, 16 Jul 1998 00:18:22 EDT   There was an article in the Boston Globe about the lack of organists. That is completely not true. There are plenty of organists... the first church that will pay more thatn $ 10,000.00 a year will have at least 5 applicants. It is just that the churches, don't want to spend money on music. An excellent example is when I quit playing at my first church. After getting paid $ 25.00 a service, one on Sat. and one on Sun. and having all the weddings to myself, it seemed worth it. But when a new pastor came in, Sister Somebody came in with him and played all but one weekend mass, all the weddings and funerals also. I heard that that certain priest donated $ 100 to the convent each month. What was I left with? ONE weekend mass at $ 25.00 a week, no weddings or funerals.... just out of no where my average monthy income went from $ 300.00 a month to just $ 100.00 a month. With a car to pay for I asked for a $ 10.00 raise to bring my total weekly salary up to $ 35.00 a week. I was only 16 at the time, and had been playing in that church for over 3 years, I was not terrible, but I was not E. Power Biggs! I belive I deserved that raise. When I asked for it, he told me that I was "getting exposure here" and that "You should not get paid for what YOU do", in addition to "You should ge no more that $ 15.00 a service." besides not letting me play the organ at my own Uncles funeral!   At that point I took the keys out of my pocket right there and said "hope you can find an organist for $ 15.00 next week"   So it's not that there is a lack of interest in the insturment, it is a lack in the priests interest to pay.   -W