PipeChat Digest #465 - Sunday, July 26, 1998
 
Re: changing times
  by "j. stuart" <jstuart1@pdq.net>
Re: What made you interested in organ?
  by "j. stuart" <jstuart1@pdq.net>
Re: F Sharp
  by "Karen R. Clifton" <karencl@worldnet.att.net>
Residence Organ Update
  by "Kevin Cartwright" <kevin1@alaweb.com>
Re: "Lord, teach us to play." [F Sharp]
  by <ComposerTX@aol.com>
Re: Residence Organ Update
  by "Vox Celeste" <voxceleste@mailexcite.com>
Re: F Sharp
  by "Paul Opel" <popel@sover.net>
Re: F Sharp
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com>
Re: F Sharp
  by "bruce cornely" <cremona84000@webtv.net>
Re: F Sharp back
  by "pianoman" <pianoman@inlink.com>
The curse of the little old lady
  by "Robert Horton" <r-horton@nwu.edu>
Re: F Sharp
  by "Robert Ehrhardt" <robert.ehrhardt@mci2000.com>
Re: Organ & Piano, Ensemble Pieces Wanted
  by "Vincent" <vlefevere@unicall.be>
 


(back) Subject: Re: changing times From: "j. stuart" <jstuart1@pdq.net> Date: Sat, 25 Jul 1998 05:33:18 -0500   i wish you great success with the kids. sounds like you definitly got thier attention. judy   sohmer@juno.com wrote:   > My wife works in a church-related pre-school, this summer with 2-3 year > olds, and in the fall with 4's. As the children enter the room with their > parents each morning, and definitely before the traditional nap time, > classical music is being played. (This is Baptist related, I might add, > and also the fact that most of the other teachers are using classical > music this summer!). Yesterday the station was playing the Bach Little > Fugue in g - wife didn't mention the organist, only the fact that the > children became suddenly very quiet and mesmerized by what they were > hearing. In two weeks, they will be going on a "Field trip" to our little > lcms church to hear the little 5-rank unit Moller, in a program I've > designed especially for them. > > Times may be changing - times are always changing, and change is here to > stay. It's what we do with those changes that ensures our success or > failure. > > Now, if I can be of further continuous influence with this batch of kids > over the next five years, wonder what good things might happen? > > Steve Ohmer > Charlottesville, VA > On Thu, 23 Jul 1998 05:00:37 -0500 "j. stuart" <jstuart1@pdq.net> writes: > >many churches, in an attempt to reach the kids, began to play music to > >a > >beat they would listen to. alot of more modern music seems to be tempo > >rather than words that gets your attention. but the words are still > >there and even if subconsciously are still heard. i guess i mean that > >for most people to like something it has to strike them somehow. while > >i > >don't think alot of music would sound good on the organ, playing > >things > >that the kids recognize and like may help spark an interest. for > >example if all i had ever heard on the organ was Bach, i probably > >would > >not be playing (attempting to play) today. my dad played the old folk > >songs i learned as a kid. this struck and interest because i knew the > >songs. aside from a little tinkering with music i don't know, i still > >mostly play the music i learned from him. i'm probably going way > >around > >the bush here but all i'm trying to say is many times it is > >familiarity > >that hits home. > > > > > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > > > > > _____________________________________________________________________ > You don't need to buy Internet access to use free Internet e-mail. > Get completely free e-mail from Juno at http://www.juno.com > Or call Juno at (800) 654-JUNO [654-5866] > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org        
(back) Subject: Re: What made you interested in organ? From: "j. stuart" <jstuart1@pdq.net> Date: Sat, 25 Jul 1998 06:01:19 -0500   Kurt, if you don't mind satisfying my wurliter electronic curiosity, do you remember which model it was? until a few weeks ago when i purchased the johannus i have now, all i had ever played was a wulitzer 4300 and the 4373 that i have now. wulizter electronics though not popular with many on the list hold a special place for me. my 4373 is slowly giving up the ghost. every time i play her something else gives out. last time it was the pedals. playing the johannus has been a challenge, everthing is in the wrong place (compared to the spinnet type wulitzers) : ) the sound is so different from the wurlitzer too. since i bought the johannus i have started trying to break some old habits and learn new things. it is not as forgiving of weak tallent as the wurlitzer. (at least to my ears) when i get back on the wurlitzer though it is just plain fun. like slipping into a pair of well broken in shoes. i have never heard this organ when it was in top condition but hope to cave her completely restored soon. the sound of the 4300 was far better and if memory serves it had more stops as well. i would really like to hear more about the wurlitzer electronics.   Kurt Kehler wrote:   > When I was young, I was fascinated by the sound of the organ which > played the theme song on that 1960's TV sitcom "Davy and Goliath". > (For those who may be unfamiliar with this witty program, the theme > song was > "A Mighty Fortress".) The piano was still my first love however, until > one Wednesday, while a High School Senior, I received "the" phone call. > The caller, from my church, wanted to know if I would play for > Sunday's service. He gave me the option of using the piano if I was > not comfortable with the organ. I said yes, knowing it was to be a > one-time substitute appearance with no further obligation and chose to > use the organ (an electronic Wurlitzer, though I did not make use of > the 25-note straight pedalboard). After the service the church offered > me a salary (about $20/week). Twenty-one years and several churches > later, I'm still at it. Thank you Fred Benner. > > Kurt Kehler > ******************************************************************** > * This space is for sale. Email me NOW for a Free Rate * > * Schedule. Learn how YOU TOO can get Rich by * > * advertising right here. Act now, supplies are limited. * > * kmkehler@csi.com * > ******************************************************************** > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org        
(back) Subject: Re: F Sharp From: "Karen R. Clifton" <karencl@worldnet.att.net> Date: Sat, 25 Jul 1998 07:23:44 -0700   Bob: One of my fondest memories from my early days as a church organist is of a grand old lady who played the piano only by ear (couldn't read a note of music), and who could ONLY play in the key of F Sharp. She is long dead now, and she was the daughter of the lady for whom our church was named. She played all over the piano, and used full chords in the base, I remember, making a very muddy sound. She didn't know doodle about music, but someone had told her she was playing in F Sharp, and she had determined that most musicians considered that a tough key to play in, and I believe her ability to play in this "hard" key was a source of pride with her. She had also learned that any hymn that had either one flat or one sharp was singable in "her" key. She only used a hymn book to keep up with the verses. One memorable Sunday night, I asked her to play the hymns with me, and we selected a few that I could play in F Sharp on the organ. We used What a Friend We Have in Jesus, and Amazing Grace, and one or two others. We had a ball, and the small congregation just loved it. That must have been 25 years ago, and now and again, people still mention the night "Pat played the piano and you played the organ on the hymns". We only did it that once, as it was not long after that her health began to fail. I'm wondering if this playing in a certain key is common to people who play by ear. Pat claimed that her daughter played by ear, and she only played in B Flat. I had never heard of this phenomenon before or since until you mentioned it, Bob. Is this unusual or not? Karen  
(back) Subject: Residence Organ Update From: Kevin Cartwright <kevin1@alaweb.com> Date: Sat, 25 Jul 1998 06:15:28 -0500   I'll go on and announce that Friday morning, I heard my very own Bourdon 16' extension for the first time (yes Mr. Pat, I did do it by Friday ;-). My Wicks did have a Bourdon 16' rank at one time, but it was taken off and replaced by quinting thye Gedackt for 1-12 of the 16' octave. The "new" 12 note extension has a home-built chest, and mitered Möller pipes. Now I can shake the walls...   Kevin Cartwright Greenville, Alabama kevin1@alaweb.com    
(back) Subject: Re: "Lord, teach us to play." [F Sharp] From: <ComposerTX@aol.com> Date: Sat, 25 Jul 1998 09:21:03 EDT   I heard a little gospel concert at a Houston church in which the organist claimed that God had taught him to play the organ. I assumed that the fact that the first three songs were pitched in the same key was the result of poor programming. Then the fourth came. At that point, the organist said that he only knew how to play in the key of F. I remarked to my friend that in 28 years of being a Christian, I had never known God to do anything half-a**ed. Then we left. Danny Ray  
(back) Subject: Re: Residence Organ Update From: "Vox Celeste" <voxceleste@mailexcite.com> Date: Sat, 25 Jul 1998 04:38:22 -0700   On Sat, 25 Jul 1998 06:15:28 -0500, Kevin Cartwright <kevin1@alaweb.com> wrote: >The "new" 12 note extension has a home-built chest, and mitered Möller >pipes. Now I can shake the walls...     As my Texas friends like to say: "Remember the Jericho" or some such thing. Be careful adding your Trumpet stop or the whole place may come tumbling down.   Sincerely,   Vox Celeste (sitting on her Grossuntersatprofundament)     Free web-based email, Forever, From anywhere! http://www.mailexcite.com  
(back) Subject: Re: F Sharp From: Paul Opel <popel@sover.net> Date: Sat, 25 Jul 1998 10:23:19 -0400   I once played for an Assembly of God church, where they had a piano and a Thomas Toaster (I guess it only does English muffins) with keys that lit up. I played the piano, and a woman in the congregation played the organ- tune in the right hand, groping with the left. Anyway, she played all hymns in "one flat or two flats", and would hold up the appropriate number of fingers before each hymn to signal me the proper key. The minister there was fond of singing hymns on the spur of the moment, so we didn't have time to figure them out first. It was kind of fun, in an odd way...   Paul   http://www.sover.net/~popel      
(back) Subject: Re: F Sharp From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com> Date: Sat, 25 Jul 1998 09:55:40 -0500   I believe the generalization about people "playing by ear" generally playing in one key is like all other generalizations/stereotypes, and not generally true. My father could play in any key fluently (whether piano or other instrument), and when he played in groups or bands (many of the other musicians also playing by ear) they played in a multitude of keys. It all depends upon one's training, experience or experimentation (or lack thereof).   I do know what you are talking about - I have met a few that played in only one or two keys, and F sharp is definitely a favorite. And I agree with Danny - God calls the mediocre to service, but he calls no one to mediocrity!   Regards,   Glenda Sutton    
(back) Subject: Re: F Sharp From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Sat, 25 Jul 1998 12:35:48 -0400 (EDT)     >I believe the generalization about people > "playing by ear" generally playing in one key > is like all other generalizations/stereotypes, > and not generally true.   >I do know what you are talking about - I have > met a few that played in only one or two keys, I've knows some people with Master's and Doc's who only play in two keys!!! (pssst! they're everywhere!)   :~+~:~+~:~+~:~+~:~+~:~+~:~+~:~+~:~+~: o o o _____bruce cornely_____ o o o o o o cremona84000@webtv.net o o o o o o ___ O a H g S o ___ o o o   Fierce in the woods, gentle in the house. -- Martial    
(back) Subject: Re: F Sharp back From: "pianoman" <pianoman@inlink.com> Date: Sat, 25 Jul 1998 12:51:43 -0500   Talk about why simple is always best! James Grebe R.P.T. of the P.T.G. from St. Louis, MO. USA, Earth Piano Service and Piano Peripherals Creator of Hardwood PLTR's and Custom Piano Benches pianoman@inlink.com If I wake up in the morning, it WILL be a great day!   ---------- > From: Paul Opel <popel@sover.net> > To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> > Subject: Re: F Sharp > Date: Saturday, July 25, 1998 9:23 AM > > I once played for an Assembly of God church, where they had a piano and a > Thomas Toaster (I guess it only does English muffins) with keys that lit > up. I played the piano, and a woman in the congregation played the organ- > tune in the right hand, groping with the left. Anyway, she played all hymns > in "one flat or two flats", and would hold up the appropriate number of > fingers before each hymn to signal me the proper key. The minister there > was fond of singing hymns on the spur of the moment, so we didn't have time > to figure them out first. It was kind of fun, in an odd way... > > Paul > > http://www.sover.net/~popel > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: The curse of the little old lady From: Robert Horton <r-horton@nwu.edu> Date: Sat, 25 Jul 1998 14:11:22 -0500   >Subject: Re: What made you interested in organ? >From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com> >Date: Fri, 24 Jul 1998 20:53:53 -0500 >When I was 12, my dad offered to buy an electronic organ and to pay for >lessons. I scornfully replied, "Who would ever want to play an organ as >long as a perfectly good piano was around?" My only experiences with organ >music were hearing the sweet little old ladies in church This shows that there is hope. Those little old ladies are being slowly and steadily replaced by decently capable and well-trained organists. I've got to confess, I almost went the way of the "left-foot Larry" when I was a senior in high school. I was already a capable pianist/trombonist/arranger, and my mom (a church cantor) suggested that I approach the local organ- ist for lessons. I was less than impressed with her "left-foot only" approach to playing the instrument and gave up on it right there. I wanted to do serious stuff like the little Fugue in Gm and I left very disappointed. I didn't think anything of the organ until I got to Cornell Univer- sity and sang tenor in the Cornell Chorale in Rossini's "Messe Sollenelle". Even though it was only a teeny little harmonium part, it introduced me to the world of serious organ playing...and I met Dr. William Cowdery, my first teacher. I never looked back after that time The above, and Glenda Sutton's post just show that the organ is so great it can overcome even the most dreadful of first impressions! We've got a ways to go, but we're slowly working our way back from the curse of the little old lady.     Robert Carl Horton, Organist 1726 1/2 Sherman Ave. Evanston, IL 60201 tel.847.424.1733 http://www.geocities.com/Vienna/Strasse/1028/index.html   "You don't have to practice all the notes... ....just the ones that you want to play well."      
(back) Subject: Re: F Sharp From: Robert Ehrhardt <robert.ehrhardt@mci2000.com> Date: Sat, 25 Jul 1998 14:14:32 -0500   One famous musician who could only play in the key of F was Irving Berlin. He had a special transposing piano built with some sort of sliding action for playing in other keys.   -- Robert Ehrhardt <robert.ehrhardt@mci2000.com> Noel Memorial UMC,Shreveport, LA Team AMIGA    
(back) Subject: Re: Organ & Piano, Ensemble Pieces Wanted From: "Vincent" <vlefevere@unicall.be> Date: Sat, 25 Jul 1998 21:44:19 +0200     -----Oorspronkelijk bericht----- Van: S. Kishimoto <KN655200@copernicus.or.jp> Aan: pipechat@pipechat.org <pipechat@pipechat.org> Datum: vrijdag 24 juli 1998 19:01 Onderwerp: Re: Organ & Piano, Ensemble Pieces Wanted     > >"Vincent"<vlefevere@unicall.be> wrote: >>We propose a composition of Chris Dubois (Belgian composer) , namely a >>concertino for small organ (positiv) and hapsichord or piano, mr Dubois= is >>willing to produce copies of this handwritten score and send it to you just >>against payment of the copy and sending costs. This payment can be done us. > >I am very glad in hearing such atractive information. >I willingly pay the cost required. > >For detailed information exchange, I will write direct e-mail. > >S. Kishimoto > Dear mr Kishimoto, I received your private E-mail but did not succeed in replying in the sam= e way, so I give you here mr Chris Dubois' proposal: he will send you a cop= y (ca 30 pages) of the handwritten scores of his concertino for only 500 BE= F (about 15 US =A7). I don't know if you can arrange via bank facilities of= such a small amount without exessif costs. Maybe you could just send US banknotes. Because I have your postal address, I wil send you a free copy of our lat= est Newsletter in English version. Vincent Lef=E8vre vlefevere@unicall.be http://uc2.unicall.be/vlefevere/index.htm (Organs in Flanders - will be actualised very soon)