PipeChat Digest #402 - Thursday, June 4, 1998
 
Re: Difference
  by "Paul Opel" <popel@sover.net>
Something to pass on:
  by "Kevin Cartwright" <kevin1@alaweb.com>
Another something to pass on:
  by "Kevin Cartwright" <kevin1@alaweb.com>
Re[2]: TO'S-WANTED:THE NEXT GENERATION
  by <steve.lamanna@tavsnet.com>
CONCERT REVIEW: "Yakety Organ" a Huge Success!!!
  by <TonyIn219@aol.com>
Next Generation
  by "R. Obert" <sam14@ix.netcom.com>
Re: Difference
  by <Satbcantor@aol.com>
Re: Next Generation
  by <Satbcantor@aol.com>
Re: Next Generation
  by <danbel@earthlink.net>
Re: Next Generation
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com>
Re: Next Generation
  by "Ian B. McLean" <solotibia@enternet.com.au>
Re: Next Generation
  by "Dr. Edward Peterson" <epeterso@madison.tdsnet.com>
Re: Next Generation
  by "Stanley Lowkis" <nstarfil@mediaone.net>
Re: Next Generation
  by "Mac Hayes" <mach37@ptw.com>
 


(back) Subject: Re: Difference From: Paul Opel <popel@sover.net> Date: Wed, 3 Jun 1998 07:41:25 -0400     The Wix I play on has a rank of stopped wood pedal pipes that hoot obnoxiously into the organist's left ear, labelled on the stoptab as "flute ouverte".   Caveat lector!   Paul     > There's even been reports of a few >organs with an "Open Gedeckt" on the Swell from a builder that shall remain >nameless. What's next, an 8' Trompette harmonique (3/4 length resonators)?? >     >Ken Sybesma > >   http://www.sover.net/~popel      
(back) Subject: Something to pass on: From: Kevin Cartwright <kevin1@alaweb.com> Date: Tue, 02 Jun 1998 21:06:12 -0500   Listers, sorry to cross a subject to another list. Everyone else, ENJOY!!   I had to pass this explanation to you. I laughed my head off. It comes from the e-mail list "PipeOrg-L" and I think you will enjoy it. Some of it actually applies to me...like the train spotter part, sweaty palms, and others:   Kevin C. kevin1@alaweb.com ________________________________________________   "(from BBC Music magazine) Gary Cole explains what organ buffs mean when they say... Church Building: designed to house pipe organ Pipe organ: Regarded as "The King of Instruments". Inspires irrational fanaticism Electronic organ: Cheap substitute. No pipes, but can pick up Radio 4 on a good day Console: Where the organist sits to play. Consists of manuals, pedals, stop knobs, flashing lights and non-optional closed circuit TV to see conductor. Consoles of larger organs resemble flight deck of 747 Manuals: Keyboards for the hands, just like on a piano. Each manual controls a separate group of stops called a 'division'. An organ often has two or more manuals; this is so you can tell it isn't a piano Pedals: Keyboard for the feet. The keys are much bigger than those for the hands, so you would think it would be easier to hit the right ones... Stop: A set or 'rank' of pipes of one particular tone colour, such as flute, trumpet or oboe. So-called because pushing a little knob in 'stops' the wind getting to those pipes. The more stops an organ has the more it gets organists going Registration: The particular stops selected by an organist - always down to personal taste Great, Swell, Choir, Pedal: Some of the many different 'divisions'. Larger organs can have even more, like solo, positive, echo, bombarde, orchestral, tower, dome, nave... there may even be a phantom somewhere Swell Box: Imagine a full orchestra playing as loud as possible all the time, in a soundproof room with the sound let out through a gigantic Venetian blind Toccata: Piece for organ and maniac Fugue: Organists play a lot of these and Organists play a lot of these and Organists play a lot of these Voluntary: You don't have to stay and listen Liturgy: Interrupts the flow of the music Hymn: Justifies an organist's existence Hymns for weddings: The Lord's my Shepherd, Praise my Soul Hymns for funerals: The Lord's my Shepherd, Praise my Soul Choir: Occupational hazard of being a church organist. Ideal accompaniment to the organ Choir practice: Preparation for going down to the pub Modern hymn: Musically unchallenged tune for the musically challenged. Limited to about three notes Improvisation: Embarrassing music to fill embarrassing silences Organ buff: Train spotter whose continuing mission is to seek out all organs. Knows stop lists and wind pressures from memory. Distinguishing features include mad, bulging eyes and sweaty palms Organ shoes: Special footwear, invariably fetid. Believed by organists to facilitate more accurate pedal playing - usually with very limited success Cathedral organist: Ultimate ambition of many church organists, ie to give up playing the organ Reluctant organist: Someone in a church without an organist who admits to being able to play the piano Romantic weekend in Paris: Great opportunity to see lots of fabulous organs   Gary Cole is a freelance record producer and engineer   submitted by David Lines"        
(back) Subject: Another something to pass on: From: Kevin Cartwright <kevin1@alaweb.com> Date: Tue, 02 Jun 1998 21:14:04 -0500   Here's another:   Kevin C. kevin1@alaweb.com __________________________________________   "I thought you might enjoy these...   Astronaut: "Nearer My God, To Thee" Baker: "I Need Thee Every Hour" Barber: "A Parting Hymn We Sing" Baseball Batter: "Seek Thee First" Builder: "How Firm A Foundation" and "The Church's One Foundation" Canoeist: "Flow, River, Flow" Carpenter: "The Nail Scarred Hand" Children's Librarian: "We've A Story To Tell" Chiropractor: "Awake My Soul, Stretch Every Nerve" Civil Engineer: "When I Survey The Wondrous Cross" Dentist: "Crown Him With Many Crowns" Electrician: "O Joyful Light" and "Send The Light" Fisherman: "Shall We Gather At The River?" Golfer: "There Is A Green Hill Far Away" Gossiper: "Pass It On," "It Is No Secret," and "Oh, For A Thousand Tongues" Historian: "Tell Me The Old, Old Story" IRS: "All To Thee (I Owe)" and "We Give Thee But Thine Own" Jogger: "The Path Of Life" Lifeguard: "Come To The Water" Long-Distance Trucker: "On The Highways And Byways Of Life" Mathematician: "10,000 Times 10,000" Medical Technician: "Revive Us Again" Mountain Climber: "The Rock That Is Higher Than I" Newlywed: "I Need Thee Every Hour" Obstetrician: "He Is Able To Deliver Thee" Optometrist: "Open Mine Eyes That I Might See" and "When I Can Read My Title Clear" Paratrooper: "Now On Land And Sea Descending" Philosopher: "I Am Thinking Today" Politician: "Standing On The Promises" Real Estate Agent: "I've Got A Mansion" Sailboater: "Deep River" Sceptic: "Almost Persuaded" Shopper: "Sweet By And By" Speech Therapist: "He Never Said A Mumbling Word" Steeple Builder: "Lift High The Cross" Stonecutter: "Rock Of Ages" Switchboard Operator: "There's A Call Comes Ringing" Tailor: "Holy, Holy, Holy" Voice Teacher: "Sing Them Over Again To Me" Watchmaker: "Take Time To Be Holy" Watchman: "Silent Night" Weatherman: "There Shall Be Showers Of Blessing"   passed on by David Lines"        
(back) Subject: Re[2]: TO'S-WANTED:THE NEXT GENERATION From: steve.lamanna@tavsnet.com Date: Wed, 03 Jun 98 08:15:02 -0500     I agree with Dan.....and in shameless Dan-Promotion, I have heard his album, and I can tell you that Jazz is VERY suited to adaptation on the organ....   John Seng, Billy Nalle, Walt Strony, and a host of others have played jazz stylings on the organ for years......how do think that any of these guys ever learned to play swing rhythms on the plug-ins?   The toy counters and tuned percussions were installed on the pipes long before someone came up with the Hammond eggs!   Steve LaManna      
(back) Subject: CONCERT REVIEW: "Yakety Organ" a Huge Success!!! From: <TonyIn219@aol.com> Date: Wed, 3 Jun 1998 14:07:50 EDT   That's it really.   I went to watch Dennis Awe, "The Original Man With The Velvet Touch" play the new Technics F100 theatre console last night and it was great.   Don't forget the Lowrey Convention at Chicago's O'Hare Holiday Inn June 9-11.   Visit Lowrey at www.Lowrey.com or call their corporate headquarters at 1-708-352-3388 for more information. Personally, I think Lowrey's are overpriced but the colored chasing-light show would be great if I still did mushrooms.   Still, free concerts are a great way for people like me to listen to other people's stylings. When I stop learning, I stop living.   John Carrington Chesterton, Indiana Home of the Unlocked Lowrey theatre console (but with a locked front door).  
(back) Subject: Next Generation From: "R. Obert" <sam14@ix.netcom.com> Date: Wed, 03 Jun 1998 15:33:37   This discussion is the best thing that has happened to theater organ in years! If you look carefully at the posts you can see some of the forces that have caused the decline of our audiences over the last few years. If you look at my first sentence you will see that I spelled theater as it should be spelled and not theatre. This is one of the biggest problems in a nutshell. Presenting the theater organ as an "art" and not as entertainment drives away more paying customers than any other thing we can do. Movies came into being as entertainment and became wildly popular as such. The organ evolved to enhance this entertainment and literally thousands of new organs came into being. Most people still would rather be entertained than enriched. (just look at TV Sitcoms and talk shows!) If you present concerts as entertainment, and then entertain, you will be much more successful. You may think that the spelling is insignificant but it underlines the basic problem. Allowing "Theatre" organists to control the programming and promotion of concerts is letting the inmates run the asylum. All performers by nature want to present themselves in the best and brightest light, and see themselves as "saviors of the art." but the trend toward larger more complicated organs with many electronic gadgets, the use of computers to allow difficult or impossible passages to be played easily, the increasingly thick and heavy registrations, the insistence that playing long and tedious medleys of once popular musicals be part of every program, the mandatory inclusion of ponderous "artistic" numbers for the education of the audience, and other conventions make concerts tedious and predictable. This also stifles the individuality that any artist might want to display. The choice of music to be included in a program has also been dictated by the artists so that that they can play what they perceive to be what the audience wants to hear but is really what they and the other artists like. Among the general public there are very few people that can appreciate fingering technique, key changes, multiple registration changes, "modern chords", and the many other gimmicks that delight the "informed". There is complete disregard and disdain for "common" music, hymns, waltzes, marches, polkas, country, bluegrass, gospel, and any number of other types of music, any of which have many more followers than the bulk of the music presented at current concerts. Including as many as possible of these in a program is bound to please a good portion of the audience and this is what encourages repeat attendance. There has been much said about the decline of theater organs themselves. If you look at the posts of the last couple of years you can see that this trend has reversed itself. In the So. Cal. Area, there are several projects in progress. The most significant one being the San Francisco Fox organ being installed into the El-Capitan Theater in Hollywood. This will be the most visible and widely-heard, by the "public", instrument yet. There are plans to install an organ in the Egyptian theater, LATOS is installing one in the South Pasadena high school, The San Diego chapter is well along in installing their organ replacing the one burned earlier, The Bakersfield Fox Has a large Wurlitzer and is planning it's installation. I fail to see any doom in all this positive progress. There is also an upsurge of media interest in organ music and organs in general. The recent very successful concert at the Orpheum Theater in Los Angeles was in a large part due to an article in the LA Times and a resulting spot on channel 5 TV. The article was commissioned and prepared by the paper without their prior knowledge of the concert. There seems to be an upsurge of silent-movie screenings around the country with several cities even presenting a movie series. One of the more hopeful trends in current music is the renewed interest in big-band music and ballroom dancing. This is especially strong among the college-age group. This music is perfectly suited to the theater organ and should be included in present programs. My conclusions are - Advertise to the general public. - Play to the general public, - Entertain don't educate, - Don't overlook any musical taste, and the people will come.    
(back) Subject: Re: Difference From: <Satbcantor@aol.com> Date: Wed, 3 Jun 1998 18:39:42 EDT   Peggy,<"Open Gedeckt" Very funny. The word in German means covered, so an open gedaeckt means an "open covered" pipe. I wonder how they do that? Ignorant!> Careful Rev, being pedantically correct aint the same as being right. Organs aren't just science. Organ builders aren't necessarily well versed in literalistics. 'Gedeckt' is a descriptive as well as a definitive. Before you call anyone 'ignorant', perhaps you'd be interested in the Lieblich Gedackt of an organ not ten miles from where I'm hitting these keys: the make up is as follows:- CC to tenorC - small scaled open woods. TenorC to MiddleC, larger scaled stopped woods. MiddleC to top stoppered metal 'tubs'. It is perfectly acceptable to call a flute a 'Gedeckt' if it fulfills the acoustic criteria expected of it. namely that it favours the fifth, squashes any tendency to overblow to the twelfth, is generally exhibiting the brightness due to an increase in the odd series of harmonics.................and sounds like a Gedeckt. Having said that, any gedackt that is not composed of stopped woods and plugged tubs, is unusual. If it makes a lot of noise, blows out your ears, and covers your screen in snot, it's a duck............no hang on a minute, I got that wrong............, if it waddles, quacks, lays eggs and swims, it's a sneeze................Oh, to hell with it. Chris.  
(back) Subject: Re: Next Generation From: <Satbcantor@aol.com> Date: Wed, 3 Jun 1998 18:43:07 EDT   In a message dated 03/06/98 22:37:43 GMT, you write:   << I spelled theater as it should be spelled and not theatre. >> Whoops, I fort it were a French werd. 'theatre' shuurely. Luv 'n fluffy bunnies, Chris. : )))))))))  
(back) Subject: Re: Next Generation From: danbel@earthlink.net Date: Wed, 03 Jun 1998 19:00:20 -0400   There were some very good points in this post but I absolutely MUST take exception to the following:   > Allowing "Theatre" organists to control the programming and promotion of >concerts is letting the inmates run the asylum. > The choice of music to be included in a program has also been dictated by >the artists so that that they can play what they perceive to be what the >audience wants to hear but is really what they and the other artists like.   With all due respect to the writer---Like Virgil Fox said, this is pure unadulterated ROT!!!!! I for one will absolutely NEVER play in any normal concert situation where the programming is "dictated." That would be professional suicide for ANY organist IMHO. Next, there is nobody that is in a better position to tell what the audience wants to hear better than the player. The LAST people who should dictate programming are the sort of people who are sometimes in the position of engaging the artist in the first place. Fortunately, those who TRY to do that sort of thing are few and far between. Frankly, I do not know of a theatre organist at present would would accept an engagement where someone else tells him/her what they can and can not play----what they WILL play and what they WON'T play.   This is just a bloddy INSANE train of thought----IMHO.   Dan    
(back) Subject: Re: Next Generation From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com> Date: Wed, 3 Jun 1998 19:04:28 -0500 (CDT)   At 06:43 PM 6/3/98 EDT, you wrote: >In a message dated 03/06/98 22:37:43 GMT, you write: > ><< I spelled theater as it > should be spelled and not theatre. >> >Whoops, I fort it were a French werd. 'theatre' shuurely. >Luv 'n fluffy bunnies, Chris. : )))))))))   In the U.S. "theater" is generally thus spelt, but organs are always referred to as "theatre" organs on both sides of the Atlantic. This is because the theatre organ was largely the brainchild of Englishman Robert Hope-Jones at WurliTzer around the time of World War I, and since WurliTzer spelt it that way so does eveyone else. Often in England, though, they are called cinema organs, a cinema or cinematograph hall in England being specifically a *movie* theater. As to what theater was originally, it was in ancient Greek *theatron*, meaning "a place for viewing", from which came the Latin *theatrum* and Norman-French *th=E9=E2tre*, and from which we get= the English *theatre* / American *theater*.   John. =20      
(back) Subject: Re: Next Generation From: "Ian B. McLean" <solotibia@enternet.com.au> Date: Thu, 04 Jun 1998 10:27:20 +1000   R. Obert wrote:   > If you look at my first sentence you will see that I spelled theater as it > should be spelled and not theatre.   Well, as the majority of the English speaking world use the English spelling - 'theatre' - then on your bases of largest usage THIS is how it should be spelled, unless you are in the U.S.     > Presenting the theater organ as an "art" and not as entertainment > drives away more paying customers than any other thing we can do.   Then, why is it as the "art" side of TPO performance as declined and the lowest common denominator taken over is it that the audiences have also declined? George Wright conclusively proved that making it happen at art form level that also appeals to all is the only proved way to build a new audience. The example is there for all to take note of. Being able to present at art form level, does not have to preclude appeal across the entire audience range, and also be the most potent on an entertainment level. Jesse Crawford, although not possessed with the same creative genius of Wright also achieved this in his hey day (not in his declining years).     > Movies > came into being as entertainment and became wildly popular as such. The > organ evolved to enhance this entertainment and literally thousands of new > organs came into being.   The only reasons that the organs came into being was to save the theatre owners money! To stop having to employ orchestra musicians.     > Most people still would rather be entertained than > enriched. (just look at TV Sitcoms and talk shows!)   I refer you to the current edition of Time magazine, that makes comments regarding some of the reasons why people are turning off TV's to learn and create on the 'net. They DO wish to be enriched. Many people HAVE had enough of being couch potatoes.     > If you present concerts as entertainment, and then entertain, you will be > much more successful.   On this I agree. There are too many artists around with pretences to being capable of public performance that entertains, or worse still, of having pretences of being art form capable, and then fail both musically and to entertain. That is why how this art form, and entertainment medium, is so compromised - it is inappropriately marketed. The public (as opposed to society members) never knows what they are going to be presented with. It matters little how good any product is (or isn't), if the marketing is incompetent. It simply will NOT sell! Or, it will lose market share.     > Allowing "Theatre" organists to control the programming and promotion of > concerts is letting the inmates run the asylum. The choice of music to be included > in a program has also been dictated by the artists so that that they can play what they perceive to be what the audience wants to hear but is really what they and the other artists like.   I think that this is mostly just plain wrong. Most musicians, especially those who frequent the concert stage, need, and want the acclamation of their audience. To spend entire programmes ostracising their audience will not please them, and they would not be rebooked. Dead end for them.     > Among the general public there are very few people that can appreciate > fingering technique, key changes, multiple registration changes, "modern > chords", and the many other gimmicks that delight the "informed". There is > complete disregard and disdain for "common" music, hymns, waltzes, marches, > polkas, country, bluegrass, gospel, and any number of other types of music, > any of which have many more followers than the bulk of the music presented > at current concerts. Including as many as possible of these in a program > is bound to please a good portion of the audience and this is what > encourages repeat attendance.   Then, as this is exactly what is occurring in the TPO marketplace (i.e. the concert platform IS becoming a prisoner of this thinking) WHY are the audiences declining? Surely this points to fact that the removal of the creative, and the virtuosic coupled with haphazard marketing is the problem? Once again in the 50's GW did the very reverse of what you suggest and he rebuilt the market from the depths of mediocrity to which it had sunk. Mediocrity that was also coupled with declining audiences. Sound familiar? The G.W. way = critical, popular and commercial entertainment success.     > If you look at the posts of the last couple of years you can > see that this trend has reversed itself.   I think that the overwhelming majority of the posts have pointed to the reverse of this.     > In the So. Cal. Area, there are > several projects in progress. The most significant one being the San > Francisco Fox organ being installed into the El-Capitan Theater in Hollywood. > This will be the most visible and widely-heard, by the "public", instrument > yet. There are plans to install an organ in the Egyptian theater, LATOS is > installing one in the South Pasadena high school, The San Diego chapter is > well along in installing their organ replacing the one burned earlier, The > Bakersfield Fox Has a large Wurlitzer and is planning it's installation. I > fail to see any doom in all this positive progress.   And, yet, the So. Cal area has spent the past 15 or more years creating state of the art instruments and employing mostly quality art form organists to perform on them. Sounds like the right thing to do to me. However, just as the U.S. is not the centre of the universe, neither is So. Cal representative of all of the U.S.     > There seems to > be an upsurge of silent-movie screenings around the country with several > cities even presenting a movie series.   I think that this is a fabulous turn of events. However, the TPO is being used as an accompaniment to the movie and not the other way around.       > One of the more hopeful trends in current music is the renewed interest in > big-band music and ballroom dancing. This is especially strong among the > college-age group. This music is perfectly suited to the theater organ and > should be included in present programs.   THIS, is where you are spot on the money. Hopefully, those in control of this incomparable entertainment art form (yes, the two DO belong together!) will leverage off this through effective MARKETING, and promotion.   Ian McLean  
(back) Subject: Re: Next Generation From: epeterso@madison.tdsnet.com (Dr. Edward Peterson) Date: Thu, 04 Jun 1998 01:07:00 -0500   On Wed, 3 Jun 1998 19:04:28 -0500 (CDT), "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com> wrote:   [...]   >As to what theater was originally, it was >in ancient Greek *theatron*, meaning "a place for viewing", from which c= ame >the Latin *theatrum* and Norman-French *th=E9=E2tre*, and from which we = get the >English *theatre* / American *theater*. >   And, as everyone who ever worked in one profesionally knows, those Americans who are behind the scenes pronounce it: "THE-ah-tuh" and them's as what's are from the great unwahshed masses (who also spell it wrongly) pronounce it "the-ATE-er".   IMnsHO   E/ (whose own theatre opens the comedy "Out of Order" a week hence)  
(back) Subject: Re: Next Generation From: Stanley Lowkis <nstarfil@mediaone.net> Date: Thu, 04 Jun 1998 03:02:10 -0400   Dr. Edward Peterson wrote: >=20 > On Wed, 3 Jun 1998 19:04:28 -0500 (CDT), "John L. Speller" > <jlspeller@stlnet.com> wrote: >=20 > [...] >=20 > >As to what theater was originally, it was > >in ancient Greek *theatron*, meaning "a place for viewing", from which= came > >the Latin *theatrum* and Norman-French *th=E9=E2tre*, and from which w= e get the > >English *theatre* / American *theater*. > > >=20 > And, as everyone who ever worked in one profesionally knows, those > Americans who are behind the scenes pronounce it: "THE-ah-tuh" and > them's as what's are from the great unwahshed masses (who also spell it > wrongly) pronounce it "the-ATE-er". >=20 > IMnsHO >=20 > E/ (whose own theatre opens the comedy "Out of Order" a week hence) >=20   Hey! Is dat the one with all the neked people innit? I seen sumpin' like that in Bawsten. It was a real cool show. No organ...but you didn't even miss it.   Stan Arts Patron  
(back) Subject: Re: Next Generation From: Mac Hayes <mach37@ptw.com> Date: Thu, 04 Jun 1998 00:37:06 -0700   R. Obert wrote: > ... The recent very successful concert at the Orpheum Theater in Los > Angeles was in a large part due to an article in the LA Times and a > resulting spot on channel 5 TV.   There was also at least one mention of it on Los Angeles' KNX (AM news radio) during a mid-morning broadcast, by the entertainment reporter, Tom Hatten. Somebody knows how to get the word out and around.   -- Mac Hayes mach37@ptw.com Cogito per aspera