PipeChat Digest #422 - Monday, June 22, 1998
 
Re: The curious wish to know
  by <ScottFop@aol.com>
Gledhill vs. Biggs?!?!  PLEASE!!!!!
  by <ScottFop@aol.com>
Re: I REFUSE to play.....
  by "Shirley" <pnst@itw.com>
Pentecost 3, Proper 7, Westbury NY (x-post)
  by <mewzishn@spec.net>
X-post: Simon Lindley, opening recital, England
  by "Cheryl C Hart" <info@copemanhart.co.uk>
Re: Must-Have Book
  by "j stuart" <jstuart1@pdq.net>
Re: I REFUSE to play.....
  by "Ian B. McLean" <solotibia@enternet.com.au>
OHS Denver - An Amazing First Day - X Posted
  by <ManderUSA@aol.com>
Re: Sacred Solos
  by "Paul Opel" <popel@sover.net>
RE: Opinions on DJB's "I REFUSE to play....."
  by "Wildhirt, Richard" <Richard.Wildhirt@PSS.Boeing.com>
RE: Opinions on DJB's "I REFUSE to play....."
  by "Jenny Moon" <bfus7@central.susx.ac.uk>
RE: Opinions on DJB's "I REFUSE to play....."
  by <danbel@earthlink.net>
RE: Opinions on DJB's "I REFUSE to play....."
  by "Jenny Moon" <bfus7@central.susx.ac.uk>
Re: I REFUSE to play.....
  by "Steve Margison" <steve@organman.com>
Weddings and Funerals.
  by "Jenny Moon" <bfus7@central.susx.ac.uk>
Re: Weddings and Funerals.
  by <danbel@earthlink.net>
Re: Weddings and Funerals.
  by <basset3@warwick.net>
Re: I REFUSE to play.....
  by "John F. Crowley" <jfjc@juno.com>
Re: Weddings and Funerals.
  by "John F. Crowley" <jfjc@juno.com>
Re: Weddings and Funerals.
  by "John F. Crowley" <jfjc@juno.com>
 


(back) Subject: Re: The curious wish to know From: <ScottFop@aol.com> Date: Sun, 21 Jun 1998 14:47:20 EDT   In a message dated 98-06-21 14:37:46 EDT, you write:   << Forgive me for raising the topic, but since the good Mr Foppiano seems to have only just gone to the Casavant, enquiring minds would like to know what appointment lies in wait for the week after next week?" Yours in good humour Q >>     AH! Well I shall attempt to explain this (in 1000 words or less) dear colleagues.   =o)   Indeed I started at St. Therese on this orga-, um, Casavant in May of last year. I have not been satisfied with it (<-----gross understatement) and, as much as I love this parish, the staff and the congregation the organ is just simply unliveable and next to impossible to do anything with. (Does anyone want the specs again as a reminder??)   In January a few friends who still reside in the Detroit area notified me of the opening at the Shrine at about the time it came out in the magazine. After initial inquiries it turned out that they were interested in me and wanted me to go there for an interview so I did. They brought me back a month later to play for the congregation and the rest is basically history.   While I was not actively seeking a new position in order to leave St. Therese, I did entertain the possibility of taking over the Grand Kilgen- and boy am I glad I did now!!!! In short- we are going to have a fully graded choir program, a professional choir, finish restoring the organ (which is in progress as we speak) and I will have a full time associate working with me. To be honest- it is too great an opportunity to pass up. I have learned much at St. Therese and from the Pastor (who is a proncely man to work with) and wish them the very best.   Well- there it is (the really short version).   Scott Foppiano  
(back) Subject: Gledhill vs. Biggs?!?! PLEASE!!!!! From: <ScottFop@aol.com> Date: Sun, 21 Jun 1998 14:59:58 EDT   I would HARDLY compare Simon Gledhill to E.Sour Figs, uh- Power Biggs.   Simon is one of the finest, most polished, consummate console artists I have EVER heard. I am always entertained, amazed and transported into a wonderful realm of melody by his music. I would rather compare Simon (in terms of current American classical artists) to Gerre Hancock, Peter Conte or David Higgs (there are of course MANY others in this roster as well). Simon's music is sheer virtuosic beauty.   While I respect E. Power Biggs and all he did for the neo-Baroque organ and its repertoire- I find his playing overly academic, pedantic and basically dull.   Simon is indeed the total antethesis of that description (at least to me).   Scott Foppiano  
(back) Subject: Re: I REFUSE to play..... From: Shirley <pnst@itw.com> Date: Sun, 21 Jun 1998 23:00:49 -0400   At 11:30 AM 6/20/98 -0400, you wrote: >At 10:59 PM 6/19/98 -0500, you wrote: >>What are the pieces that you simply WILL NOT play again, under >>most any circumstance, and why? >> > >Somewhere My Love, aka Dr. Chicago >The Entertainer >When the Saints go Marching In >2001 >Starwars > >All caused from extended tenure in pipe organ equipped pizza joints! > >djb     Oh boy, I'll add my vote to the Dr. Zhivago theme! In those days, I was playing 4 or 5 nights a week, two 20-minute shows each night. Dr. Zhivago was so long, they shut the film down halfway through and allowed an intermission. Well, "Lara's Theme" (aka "Somewhere My Love") was the only decent piece of music from that score. I played it last going into the film. I played it once coming out of the film for intermission, and I played it again going back in after intermission. Three times a night. And the manager kept that movie for two weeks! Oy. Never again. It's not the best written piece of music either.   At least John Williams was fresh and new. But yes, Star Wars got old too. 'Cept for .... oh heck, I can't think of the name of it now.... it's kind of ragtime, definitely a "20's" kind of sound, and was dance music in a bar scene for the residents of whatever planet they were on.   John Williams was fresh for a while... until "Superman" started sounding like "Star Wars". Gotta love those orchestrations, tho.   --Shirley ***********************************************************   A friend is someone who knows the song in your heart and sings it back to you when you have forgotten how it goes.      
(back) Subject: Pentecost 3, Proper 7, Westbury NY (x-post) From: mewzishn@spec.net Date: Sun, 21 Jun 1998 23:44:02 +0000   Third Sunday after Pentecost (Proper 7) 21st June 1998, 11.00 am, Rite II Church of the Advent, Westbury, New York The Rev'd Jeffrey Hoyt Krantz, rector Kenneth L. Sybesma, choirmaster and organist     Voluntary, “Herzlich tut mich erfreuen" (Eleven Chorale Preludes) Johannes Brahms * Hymn at the Entering Procession, Nettleton ("Come, thou fount of every blessing") Gloria in excelsis Deo, Intercession Mass (David Hurd) Hymn at the Gospel Procession, "Jesus Keep Me Near the Cross" Voluntary at the Presentation, "Allemande (Suite in D)" A. Nonymous ** Hymn at the Preparation, "The Old Rugged Cross" Sanctus et Benedictus, Mass for a Soulful People (Grayson Warren Brown) Lord's Prayer, Malotte Confractoria, "Agnus Dei" Eucharist of the Soul (Lena McLin) Voluntary at the Holy Communion, "Prelude, Op. 28, No. 4 [E minor]" (piano) Frederic Chopin Hymn at the Ablutions, "Jesus Loves Me" Hymn at the Retiring Procession, "Down By the Riverside" *** Improvisation     It being the third Sunday of the month, it is parish custom to use "Lift Every Voice and Sing II" for hymns and music of the liturgy.   * Couldn't think of a single more appropriate piece to play on the day of the summer solstice. From the poem "Fruehlingsblumen" the first line of the text is "Herzlich tut mich erfreuen die fröhliche Sommerzeit."   ** Easily the world's most prolific composer!!! : )   *** What a hoot'n'holler hymn this was -- about as close to happy-clappy as this place ever gets, and makes for a great improvisation theme.              
(back) Subject: X-post: Simon Lindley, opening recital, England From: Cheryl C Hart <info@copemanhart.co.uk> Date: Mon, 22 Jun 1998 11:32:41 +0100   Greetings. It's good to be back, and here is some news for anyone on this side of the pond who is interested and may not already know about it:   Simon Lindley is giving the opening recital on the new (installed last week) two-manual (23 speaking stops) Copeman Hart   in St Peter's Parish Church, East Blatchington, Seaford, East Sussex, on Tuesday 23rd June (tomorrow!) at 8.00 pm.     The PROGRAMME says:   JSB - T&F in D minor S565   Felix Mendelssohn-Bartholdy - Sonata III in A major, Op 65   Robert Schumann - Four Sketches, Op 58   Flor Peeters - Variations on an original theme, Op 58   Alfred Hollins - A Trumpet Minuet and Song of Sunshine   George F Handel - Largo (from Xerxes)   Francis Poulenc - Suite Francaise   JSB - Chorale from Cantata 147: Jesu, joy of man's desiring   Joseph Bonnet - Variations de Concert     Organ specification will be in the programme, but I will be glad to supply it to any who ask for it.     Cheryl   COPEMAN HART & COMPANY LTD Church Organ Builders ENGLAND Tel 01933 652600 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ US CONSULTANCY: Copeman Hart - America Email Cpmnhartus@aol.com Tel 423 482 8600 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ AUSTRALIAN CONSULTANCY: Copeman Hart - Australia Email hamilton.stives@bigpond.com Tel 02 9983 9775 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~   http://www.copemanhart.co.uk    
(back) Subject: Re: Must-Have Book From: j stuart <jstuart1@pdq.net> Date: Mon, 22 Jun 1998 04:38:38 -0500   could you send me the ordering information for "L'Organiste. i am desperately seeking more music for the organ. thank you jae   rnickel@itol.com wrote:   > Hi, List: > > I can't remember what the original subject line was, but someone asked about > what books we can't get along without? I'd have to say that "L'Organiste" > is one of those. I've recently acquired it, and I've been enjoying > exploring Cesar and his writing. And, for the manuals-only organist, it > fits the bill. > > Hope this helps. > > Bob Nickel > > P. S. Someone else responded with the series The Liturgical Organist. My > very first organ teacher gave me a copy when I was but a lad. (Well, I'm > not that old.) I have enjoyed using this book and think of her always while > playing from it. At this stage in my life, the pieces are now > sight-readable. In those days, whew! > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org        
(back) Subject: Re: I REFUSE to play..... From: "Ian B. McLean" <solotibia@enternet.com.au> Date: Mon, 22 Jun 1998 15:15:36 +1000   Shirley wrote:   > Oh boy, I'll add my vote to the Dr. Zhivago theme! In those days, I was > playing 4 or 5 nights a week, two 20-minute shows each night.   I can add my own vote for the TOP number in my "refuse-to-play" stakes. However, I have a major issue with "refuse-to-play". I did actually "refuse-to-play" Lara's Theme for a couple of weeks when I was playing, 6 nights (restaurant) and 5 days (lunches in the club showroom), and then thought "Hey! I'm being paid to entertain these people and they WANT to hear it." So, I did. Not authentically at first, but with an interpretation in 4/4 time based on the Frank Sinatra swing version. That version pleased ME.   Patrons would come up (or send cards) and ask "please play Lara's Theme" and I would place it in the next bracket. It was interesting. I would always get responses like "what an interesting arrangement for a piece that I usually hate", and then, concurrently, from the people that had made the request "when are you going to play it?"! THEY couldn't recognise it unless it was in 3/4 time!   My point? Well, the only point that I'd think MUST be made is that in similar instances to mine (i.e. non concert situations) then muso's MUST respond to requests with as much integrity and purpose to our performances that we can muster. In a concert scenario where the context of the programming is critical to success, then this must be at the artist's TOTAL control and judgement. Requests can, and often, SHOULD be left out to ensure that the programme itself has integrity and impact.   As for the Entertainer, I know of no Joplin piece that does not deserve absolute respect and maximum effort from any performer at any time.   I think that my views on only the very best in performance occurring on the concert stage, are well known by many. However, when I see threads such as these, which, to me, demonstrate the height of arrogance, and disrespect by muso's for their audiences, especially in non concert situations, I am appalled.   If a muso does not wish to perform what the public wishes to hear in gig type scenarios then they should stop immediately and make way for those that do. If a concert artist does not play a BALANCED programme that ENTERTAINS (for TPO concerts) with musical integrity, then they will not be concert artists for very long.   We are supposed to be creative. We should find a way to make these "refuse-to-play" situations palatable to ourselves, and our audiences. To do otherwise is nonsense, lazy, arrogant, and stupid.   BTW, I continued on from that point to deliver both performances when the request came along. Accolades from BOTH sections of my audiences. Never again did I feel aggrieved at having to play "Lara's Theme".   Ian McLean  
(back) Subject: OHS Denver - An Amazing First Day - X Posted From: <ManderUSA@aol.com> Date: Mon, 22 Jun 1998 04:03:25 EDT   Sunday, June 21   Dear Lists,   Forgive the cross posting, but I had dinner this evening with David Scribner, who is co-owner of Pipechat, and he asked that I put my PipOrg-L remarks on that list as well.   The convention day began at 1 p.m., the morning being filled with arrivals and registrations. First venue: The Paramount Theater, with its remarkable 20 rank WurliTzer, which speaks clearly and forcefully into the room from big, open chambers on either side. The Pedal is incredibly strong and quick. There is a tremendous variety of solo sounds, all of which we heard. It all began with the two consoles rising majestically from under the stage, with Joel Kremer and Robert Castle at the main console and "slave" console respectively, giving us a great medley of popular show tunes. It being Sunday, we made a feeble attempt to sing "The church's one foundation," accompanied by Robert Castle in something other than the "cathedral tradition," and without us having words in front of us. Robert then pushed a switch on the left side of the "slave," that sent it slowly back to the basement. Joel Kremer continued with several solo pieces, ending with "The Stars and Stripes Forever." Professor of History at U. Colorado, Thomas Noel, then gave us, with slides, some history of Denver's development, partly spurred by a secondary gold rush, about a decade after the great one to California. James Mosby Bratton, complete with slides, spoke to the topic "Hook Your Hastings to a Steere," a history of Denver and area churches and organs. All too often, seeing a wonderful, old church building, we learned that it had been torn down. All too often, the organs we saw on the screen, some of them very lovely indeed, had been, in the softly delivered words of our lecturer, "replaced by a toaster."   After a break, we returned to our seats for "White Desert," a full length, wonderfully-made 1925 silent film about the building of the railroad through the mountains west of Denver. This was both a "cliff-hanger" and a "tear jerker," the effect heightened greatly by Robert Castle's seemless and suitable accompaniment on the great organ. Everyone was a bit drained and teary-eyed when the lights came up.   After dinner on our own, we were bussed to St. John's in the Wilderness Episcopal Cathedral for a glorious, if to some, a bit radical, Evensong. I was personally moved by the whole service, and in at least one place, to my great surprise. Donald Pearson is the Cathedral's musician, and his very capable associate is John Repulski. The organ is the justly celebrated 1938 Kimball, recently restored. Donald Pearson began with the ravishing Frank Bridge Adagio, followed by the Invitatory, from a set of Responses by Donald Pearson, all of which we heard during the course of the service. Phos Hilaron was a plainsong-like setting by Richard Proulx, with several refrains for us all to sing. Psalm 138 was sung to an attractive verse-with-fauxbourdons sort of music by Glen McGrath. Both very long scripture readings, the first read by a man from the congregation, the second by a woman, were beautifully read. The Magnificat and Nunc Dimittis were the South American Rhythm-inspired settings by Bryan Kelly. We sang the Apostles' Creed on one note, accompanied by a lush chordal organ accompaniment by Jeffrey Rickard. In Donald Pearson's setting of the Versicles and Responses, the versicle was in each case accompanied richly, using mostly harp-like sounds, on an electronic keyboard played by John Repulski. I have an inate resistance to the presence of loudspeakers in church music-making, but I have to say, I found this very effective, and even beautiful. The music is well-written, the performance was solid, and there was clear amplification of the sound, with no distortion. I have to record that some I spoke with after the service were offended by this stuff. Here followed three fine anthems, confidently sung by the very large Cathedral Choir. "O sing to the Lord with hymns newly made," by Donald Pearson; "How lovely are the messengers," Mendelssohn; and "How lovely are your dwellings,' by John Leavitt. We finished with a rousing singing of Lauda Anima, Praise, my soul, the King of Heaven, as only an OHS congregation can provide.   After a short stretch, we were treated to "A Concert of Mighty Organ Duets," played by Donald Pearson and John Repulski - as follows:   Mozart Fantasia 608, four hands enriching the harmonies.   Danse Macabre (Saint-Saens), four hands.   The C Major Soler Concerto, Andante and Minuet, with John Repulski going to a small Casavant continuo/chamber organ.   The Ride of the Valkyries, with a wonderful thick texture, made possible by four hands.   After singing O filii et filiae from the 1982 hymnbook, we heard John Rutter;s variations on it for two organists.   Ragtime by Charles Callahan, and finally,   French Toccata on the name Helmut, by Ralf Bolting (b.)   The performers were bouyed by the great ovation at the end, including many shouts of Bravo.   And so ended a great OHS day!   Malcolm Wechsler  
(back) Subject: Re: Sacred Solos From: Paul Opel <popel@sover.net> Date: Mon, 22 Jun 1998 09:45:41 -0400   Tops on the list are the Dvorak "Biblical Songs", available in high and low in any number of editions. The Schirmer one has decent translations-stay away from the International edition, as the text is pretty unsingable.   I'd also list the Vaughan Williams "Five Mystical Songs" and the songs from "Pilgrim's Progress", both from Boosey & Hawkes, as I remember. B&H also has songs by Richard DeLong, which just tread the line between pop and worthwhile- they have a pop-y sense but some real music going on. I can keep going for pages- my church doesn't have a choir, and I have excellent soloists, so if you want, I can keep going...     Paul   http://www.sover.net/~popel      
(back) Subject: RE: Opinions on DJB's "I REFUSE to play....." From: "Wildhirt, Richard" <Richard.Wildhirt@PSS.Boeing.com> Date: Mon, 22 Jun 1998 07:15:12 -0700   > danbel@earthlink.net wrote: > > Somewhere My Love, aka Dr. Chicago > > The Entertainer > > When the Saints go Marching In > > 2001 > > Starwars > I remember attending a Virgil Fox concert back the early 70's. A selection on his program was labeled, "A Surprise." It was strategically placed after intermission when anticipation could mount.   The lights flashed. The people took their seats. Virgil returned to the stage, and played . . . The Entertainer. You could tell he was having a lot of fun with it, a rather whimsical arrangement.   When he was done, he remarked, "In the movie, they played that one too fast!"   Aside from all that, I really don't have any pieces that I refuse to play. Of course it depends on the appropriateness of the situation, but if someone wants to hear a particular piece, why not play it? Especially if it's someone who has had little or no exposure to the organ.  
(back) Subject: RE: Opinions on DJB's "I REFUSE to play....." From: Jenny Moon <bfus7@central.susx.ac.uk> Date: Mon, 22 Jun 1998 15:20:34 BST         > > danbel@earthlink.net wrote: > > > Somewhere My Love, aka Dr. Chicago > > > The Entertainer > > > When the Saints go Marching In > > > 2001 > > > Starwars     You REFUSE to play 'The Entertainer'????   You heathen:) I have to agree with the rest of your list, but The Entertainer.....(shock, horror!)      
(back) Subject: RE: Opinions on DJB's "I REFUSE to play....." From: danbel@earthlink.net Date: Mon, 22 Jun 1998 10:39:49 -0400   At 03:20 PM 6/22/98 BST, Jenny Moon: >You REFUSE to play 'The Entertainer'???? > >You heathen:) I have to agree with the rest of your list, but The >Entertainer.....(shock, horror!) >   I assure you that after 10+ years of playing it several times a night -- 6 nights a week in a restaurant situation -- you would not play it again either!!!   djb    
(back) Subject: RE: Opinions on DJB's "I REFUSE to play....." From: Jenny Moon <bfus7@central.susx.ac.uk> Date: Mon, 22 Jun 1998 15:34:02 BST       > At 03:20 PM 6/22/98 BST, Jenny Moon: > >You REFUSE to play 'The Entertainer'???? > > > >You heathen:) I have to agree with the rest of your list, but The > >Entertainer.....(shock, horror!) > > > > I assure you that after 10+ years of playing it several times a night -- 6 > nights a week in a restaurant situation -- you would not play it again > either!!! > > djb >   Fair point, but I still like it:)   Jen.      
(back) Subject: Re: I REFUSE to play..... From: "Steve Margison" <steve@organman.com> Date: Mon, 22 Jun 1998 09:54:45 -0500   You're all talking about Dr. Z and Entertainer, but wouldn't the absolutely #1 worst song to have to play every night be THE MACARENA???   Thankfully, since I don't play professionally, I don't even have to LEARN that piece of junk!   (standing by for hate mail from all those who love the macarena and have no musical taste whatsoever <grin>....)       |===================== Steve Margison =====================| |=== Staff Organist, Tivoli Theatre, Downers Grove, IL ===| |Organs, Theatres, Ham Radio, Lots of things at my WebSite:| | www.organman.com | |==========================================================|    
(back) Subject: Weddings and Funerals. From: Jenny Moon <bfus7@central.susx.ac.uk> Date: Mon, 22 Jun 1998 16:06:25 BST     Greetings.   Does anybody out there get utterly frustrated by being asked to play the same hymns time and again at weddings and funerals? I think so.   On very rare occasions a couple who are regular church attenders get married at my church and choose different hymns that they have heard at church. This is such a pleasure, but more often than not it is a secular family who only go to church for weddings, funerals and Christmas (but still call themselves regular) and select hymns that they remember from school. Allow me to tell you the most frequented hymns.   Weddings.   O Praise ye The Lord. Love Divine all Loves Excelling. Praise my soul the king of Heaven. All things bright and beautiful.   Wedding March. Mendelssohn. Bridal March. Wagner.   Funerals.   The Lords my shepherd. Abide with me.   Thats about it for the funeral list.   The church have even tried to get people to choose different hymns by giving a list of recomendations as they book their weddings/ funerals but this has had no effect. The same hymns are chosen.   If anybody has managed to solve this problem and pursuade the happy couple/ sad mourners to choose different hymns I would appreciate your advice. Apart from myself and the choir being frustrated at singing the same hymn 4 times a Saturday, about 7 pages in my hymnal are getting very worn.   Jen.   bfus7@central.sussex.ac.uk      
(back) Subject: Re: Weddings and Funerals. From: danbel@earthlink.net Date: Mon, 22 Jun 1998 11:20:02 -0400   Jenny Moon wrote: > Does anybody out there get utterly frustrated by being asked to play > the same hymns time and again at weddings and funerals? I think so. > > Apart from myself and the choir being frustrated at singing > the same hymn 4 times a Saturday, about 7 pages in my hymnal are > getting very worn.   This SAME principle can be applied to playing "The Entertainer", "Somewhere My Love" or anything else OVER and OVER again!!!! NOW, do you get my point??? :):):)   djb  
(back) Subject: Re: Weddings and Funerals. From: basset3@warwick.net Date: Mon, 22 Jun 1998 12:16:43 -0400   > Does anybody out there get utterly frustrated by being asked to play > the same hymns time and again at weddings and funerals? I think so. > Perhaps so, but hymns are selected for emotional reasons because they express the feelings of the participants. You may tire of performing the same hymns, but for each new set of mourners it is a new experience just for them. All musicians face this -- e.g., the same operatic role or piano concerto may be performed throughout the world. The challenge is to keep it fresh and meaningful for each new set of listeners. That is where artistry comes into play. What do actors do who perform a Wed. matinee and then a performance at night? It's the professionalism you bring to your performance as if it were being heard for the very first time. I still like Abide with Me. Robert Clooney  
(back) Subject: Re: I REFUSE to play..... From: jfjc@juno.com (John F. Crowley) Date: Mon, 22 Jun 1998 13:02:44 -0500   I wonder just how long a professional musician would last in an employment situation if he/she refused to play what the public wished to hear. If a person is truly creative while sitting at a console/keyboard/piano, et al, there should be no problem.   Musically,   John F. Crowley   _____________________________________________________________________ You don't need to buy Internet access to use free Internet e-mail. Get completely free e-mail from Juno at http://www.juno.com Or call Juno at (800) 654-JUNO [654-5866]  
(back) Subject: Re: Weddings and Funerals. From: jfjc@juno.com (John F. Crowley) Date: Mon, 22 Jun 1998 13:11:15 -0500   For those who REFUSE TO PLAY certain types or pieces of music, I would suggest they save this post. This would apply not only to services at church but also in the entertainment world as well.   We used to have a "pizza joint" here in st. Louis that had at one time a Barton/Wurlitzer and the organist was asked to play the usual fare, included The Entertainer, not to mention Chattanooga Choo Choo. For those of us who where they listening for awhile, they were always enjoyable. BUT what if we were custoimers who just walked in the door after they were played?   Sorry guys/gals/maestros, et al, with the exception of The Macarena, this I refuse to play stuff......I'm not buying it.     John   _____________________________________________________________________ You don't need to buy Internet access to use free Internet e-mail. Get completely free e-mail from Juno at http://www.juno.com Or call Juno at (800) 654-JUNO [654-5866]  
(back) Subject: Re: Weddings and Funerals. From: jfjc@juno.com (John F. Crowley) Date: Mon, 22 Jun 1998 13:07:02 -0500   Having been organist at Sts Mary & Joseph for a little over eight years, I have been faced with similar situations. Funerals in general have been no problem. If the family hasen't requested anything specific in the way of music, then I pull out what i call my standard package.   Weddings however are a little bit different. Couples either don't know at all what they want, or they have so much they would like to have that one would have to rent the Metropolitan Opera House. I have a list of suggestions that contain both classical and contemporary (modern) pieces, and I also tell them that this is what works very well at our Parish Church. For the most part in general, their have been no complaints.   John F. Crowley   _____________________________________________________________________ You don't need to buy Internet access to use free Internet e-mail. Get completely free e-mail from Juno at http://www.juno.com Or call Juno at (800) 654-JUNO [654-5866]