PipeChat Digest #423 - Tuesday, June 23, 1998
 
Re: Weddings and Funerals.
  by "Peggy C. Bie" <peggyb@gate.net>
Re: I REFUSE to play.....
  by "Shirley" <pnst@itw.com>
Re: Must-Have Book
  by "V. David Barton" <vdbarton@erols.com>
Re: I REFUSE to play.....
  by <danbel@earthlink.net>
Re: I REFUSE to play.....
  by "Jenny Moon" <bfus7@central.susx.ac.uk>
Re: I REFUSE to play.....
  by "Stanley Lowkis" <nstarfil@mediaone.net>
Re: I REFUSE to play.....
  by "Ian B. McLean" <solotibia@enternet.com.au>
Re: Opinions on DJB's "I REFUSE to play....."
  by "Frank Johnson" <usd465@horizon.hit.net>
Variety of  music (Was: Weddings and Funerals)
  by "Patricia R. Maimone" <patmai@juno.com>
OHS Denver - Day Two - X Post
  by <ManderUSA@aol.com>
 


(back) Subject: Re: Weddings and Funerals. From: "Peggy C. Bie" <peggyb@gate.net> Date: Mon, 22 Jun 1998 14:58:06 -0400   Dear John Crowley,   Would you be willing to post your standard suggested packages for wedding and funeral music? (Or send to me privately.)   "Funerals in general have been no problem. If the family hasen't requested anything specific in the way of music, then I pull out what i call my standard package.   "Weddings however are a little bit different. Couples either don't know at all what they want, or they have so much they would like to have that one would have to rent the Metropolitan Opera House. I have a list of suggestions that contain both classical and contemporary (modern) pieces, and I also tell them that this is what works very well at our Parish Church..." --   Peggy C. Bie   http://www.geocities.com/CapitolHill/Senate/1095  
(back) Subject: Re: I REFUSE to play..... From: Shirley <pnst@itw.com> Date: Mon, 22 Jun 1998 16:05:13 -0400   At 03:15 PM 6/22/98 +1000, Ian McLean wrote: >My point? Well, the only point that I'd think MUST be made is that in >similar instances to mine (i.e. non concert situations) then muso's MUST >respond to requests with as much integrity and purpose to our >performances that we can muster. In a concert scenario where the context >of the programming is critical to success, then this must be at the >artist's TOTAL control and judgement. Requests can, and often, SHOULD be >left out to ensure that the programme itself has integrity and impact.     Ian, you made some interesting points in this post. This particular one, however, hit home. And it is one of the reasons I "retired" from theatre organ 15 years ago. My concerts were always varied, and included pieces I could play well. My arrangements were pleasing to listen to, and theoretically sound. I would not, however, stoop to the levels I was finding in the uneducated audiences at that time (in the '70s and '80s). I admire anyone who can "put up with" the musical atmosphere of a pizza place.... I'm not one that could succeed at it, because it would mean sacrificing musical integrity, IMO. I'm not comfortable playing to the lowest common demoninator.   Geez, I've gotten snobbish in my old age...........   --Shirley   ***********************************************************   A friend is someone who knows the song in your heart and sings it back to you when you have forgotten how it goes.   ************************************************************  
(back) Subject: Re: Must-Have Book From: "V. David Barton" <vdbarton@erols.com> Date: Mon, 22 Jun 1998 16:17:15 -0400   Franck, C=E9sar, *L'Organiste," Edition Kalmus, #K04533, $11.95. Wonderf= ul service music; essentially sight-readable.   -----Original Message----- From: j stuart <jstuart1@pdq.net> To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: Monday, June 22, 1998 8:33 AM Subject: Re: Must-Have Book     >could you send me the ordering information for "L'Organiste. i am desperately >seeking more music for the organ. thank you jae > >rnickel@itol.com wrote: > >> Hi, List: >> >> I can't remember what the original subject line was, but someone asked about >> what books we can't get along without? I'd have to say that "L'Organiste" >> is one of those. I've recently acquired it, and I've been enjoying >> exploring Cesar and his writing. And, for the manuals-only organist, = it >> fits the bill. >> >> Hope this helps. >> >> Bob Nickel >> >> P. S. Someone else responded with the series The Liturgical Organist. My >> very first organ teacher gave me a copy when I was but a lad. (Well, = I'm >> not that old.) I have enjoyed using this book and think of her always while >> playing from it. At this stage in my life, the pieces are now >> sight-readable. In those days, whew! >> >> "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >> PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >> HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >> List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >> Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >> Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > > > > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >    
(back) Subject: Re: I REFUSE to play..... From: danbel@earthlink.net Date: Mon, 22 Jun 1998 16:26:55 -0400   Shirley wrote: > I > admire anyone who can "put up with" the musical atmosphere of a pizza > place.... I'm not one that could succeed at it, because it would mean > sacrificing musical integrity, IMO.   There are many of us who feel the same way Shirley. We feel it NOW that we no longer play in that atmosphere and we CERTAINLY felt when we WERE playing in that atmosphere--at least I did. It is NOT an easy job I can tell you from having done it for many years. The kids running around and screaming---the basic CLASS of people who were in there much of the time---all contributed to it sometimes being a very taxing circumstance.   What I WILL say is that I always TRIED to play what would please the audience the majority of the time. In the shank of the evening, the loud and boistrous "stuff" always went down well. A ballad would have been lost in the din of the room. Late in the evening, however, was a different story! THAT is when the musician could play something with a little more substance to it -- THEN is when the REAL music listeners learned to show up! :):) They KNEW we had to play the "stuff" in the early part of the shift----so they all came later and THAT was WONDERFUL! You were then actually playing for people who CARED what you were playing and not just how much you were able to make the building shake! :) I'm NOT kidding!   So, basically the musical integrity was shot to hell early in the evening and then returned like a miricle about 9:00 PM !! :):) LOL   Dan  
(back) Subject: Re: I REFUSE to play..... From: Jenny Moon <bfus7@central.susx.ac.uk> Date: Mon, 22 Jun 1998 21:34:06 BST       On Mon, 22 Jun 1998 > Shirley wrote: > > I > > admire anyone who can "put up with" the musical atmosphere of a pizza > > place....   I have read these last few posts with interest. I have taken an extract from Shirleys last post for no other reason than it mentions, again, music in a PIZZA PLACE.   I have never heard of such a thing. I understand this to mean that in America you have an organist in pizza shops, entertaining the customers. Is this right? If it is, this is most interesting. Here in England we normally find an old radio on the end of the counter, playing the local radio station. This is the only entertainment we can expect while waiting for our kabab and chips!   Jen.   bfus7@central.sussex.ac.uk      
(back) Subject: Re: I REFUSE to play..... From: Stanley Lowkis <nstarfil@mediaone.net> Date: Mon, 22 Jun 1998 17:15:59 -0400   Jenny Moon wrote: > > > I have never heard of such a thing. I understand this to mean that in > America you have an organist in pizza shops, entertaining the > customers. Is this right? If it is, this is most interesting. Here > in England we normally find an old radio on the end of the counter, > playing the local radio station. This is the only entertainment we > can expect while waiting for our kabab and chips! > > Jen.   I'm surprised that you didn't know this, Jenny. Here in the states pizza pipe organs outnumber radios two to one! Frequently the organist is required to do "double duty", as it were, as the pizza chef. This is one of the few venues where it can truthfully be stated that the theater organist does indeed "Make a lot of dough".   :-)   Stan  
(back) Subject: Re: I REFUSE to play..... From: "Ian B. McLean" <solotibia@enternet.com.au> Date: Tue, 23 Jun 1998 11:22:38 +1000   Shirley wrote:   And it is one of the reasons I "retired" from theatre > organ 15 years ago. My concerts were always varied, and included pieces I > could play well. My arrangements were pleasing to listen to, and > theoretically sound. I would not, however, stoop to the levels I was > finding in the uneducated audiences at that time (in the '70s and '80s). I > admire anyone who can "put up with" the musical atmosphere of a pizza > place.... I'm not one that could succeed at it, because it would mean > sacrificing musical integrity, IMO. I'm not comfortable playing to the > lowest common demoninator.   And, neither am I! I gave it all up in 1986 after 24 years. But.........   I have been able to observe on three trips to the U.S. successful pizza parlours and their organists. I found it fascinating that those who didn't simply "throw away" the numbers, could, and often did, capture the audience. Two of those were Dan Bellomy, and Ron Rhode.   Despite all that Dan as written that could imply the contrary, he NEVER let the side down regardless of the noise, or the requests. As for the Mesa situation, it seems to me that it has succeeded in not allowing organists to get too tired, and by them delivering all with musical integrity and entertainment.   Me? I am not good in long term ongoing iterative situations so, my gigs were always limited to about 9 months each. Then I would take a break for two to three months. Playing in these sorts of venues is draining and not dissimilar to how I imagine working in a cannery could be (draining?).   I can't and don't agree that everything has to be directed to the "LCD", and that in doing so sacrifices musical integrity. But, even if every night was 100% LCD, then that is no reason for chucking musical integrity out the door. However, I can certainly understand that if the musician has not only no empathy for what has to be played, but also disgust at being in the position of having to play it, then the outcome and the sense of being compromised will ruin all. I have been in this situation, and I have nothing but admiration for those musos that don't fall in a heap when LCD is a big part of their lot.   So, IMHO, you did do the right thing in bowing out. Just as I did in 1986. There are always others out there who can fill the gaps, many without chucking out their musical integrity. This was part of the point of my original response. If you don't like it, get out and make room for those who can make a fist of it.   Now, for TPO concerts, well, that's a completely different situation.............   Ian McLean  
(back) Subject: Re: Opinions on DJB's "I REFUSE to play....." From: usd465@horizon.hit.net (Frank Johnson) Date: Mon, 22 Jun 1998 22:42:55 -0500   >When baseball announcer Harry Caray died, the organist played "Take Me >Out To The Ballgame" at the end. However, I must add, it was a rather >solemn arrangement at that..made good use of a very large instrument. > >john   Wasn't that a great improv on "Take Me Out to the Ballgame?" For some time it was available as a video from the Chicago Tribune (I think is was). I played it over and over for many friends.   Frank   Frank R. Johnson (KA0API) Spirit of New Orleans - clarinet/leader http://www.hit.net/~usd465/ 1922 E. 14th Winfield, KS 67156      
(back) Subject: Variety of music (Was: Weddings and Funerals) From: patmai@juno.com (Patricia R. Maimone) Date: Mon, 22 Jun 1998 23:30:54 -0400   Dear Jen and Pipechatters,   It seems to me that there are two ways of looking at this. 1 - To encourage a variety of hymns and special music, instead of just a list of recommended music (which unfortunately the people may not recognize by title), why not make a tape which you could lend to the bride & groom? In similar fashion, why not make a tape of your choir singing hymns and anthems that you would suggest for the families at memorial services?   Our chapel has not done that, because we do not have that many weddings, (12 - 20 per year) but I know that the Catholic Chapel has issued a tape with several suggested processionals and recessionals and music for the wedding mass.   2-On the other hand, this is the only wedding for most people...In many cases I would be quite happy for them to select hymns, rather than some choices I have been asked to play..   The memorial service is supposed to be a comfort to the remaining family as well as worshipping God and celebrating the life of the deceased. It is a difficult balance; certain hymns can be helpful in this process. Brahms' Requiem differed from earlier requiems in its design to comfort the living. Does your choir have "How Lovely Is Thy Dwelling Place" ready to go at a day's notice? If so, add that to the tape, and see if some families will select that one. My adult choir would rarely be available to sing for a memorial service; a few vocal and/ or instrumental soloists have occasionally added some special music during the service to the organ prelude and postlude.   This might be a good time for each of us to list the music that we would like to have at our own memorial services! It is definitely a difficult decision for people to make during a time of grieving.     Best regards.   Pat   _____________________________________________________________________ You don't need to buy Internet access to use free Internet e-mail. Get completely free e-mail from Juno at http://www.juno.com Or call Juno at (800) 654-JUNO [654-5866]  
(back) Subject: OHS Denver - Day Two - X Post From: <ManderUSA@aol.com> Date: Tue, 23 Jun 1998 02:04:56 EDT   Dear Lists,   I am writing this on the bus (8:00 a.m. departure, the first early departure, and taking a bit of getting used to!). We are heading to Lyons, CO, and in line with convention policy, we are gradually experiencing higher and higher altitudes. Yesterday, it was enough just to adjust to mile high Denver. Today, we are at 8,500 feet. Tomorrow is a day in Denver, and on Wednesday, we will spend some of the day at over 10,000 feet. On this clear, beautiful day, we are surrounded by snow capped mountains, and are told we will be throwing snowballs by day's end! Enough travelogue.   The first musical event today: at The Old Stone Church of Lyons, Will Headlee, Professor of Organ Emeritus, Syracuse University. The organ: Hook & Hastings two-manual, 9 stops, Opus 1948, built in 1902 - an organ of great charm and beauty.   Will Headlee is a regular at OHS conventions, and his cheerful playing, programming, and comments are always a delight. He also makes a point of telling helpful bits about his registrations, which really explored the organ very effectively.The program: Mendelssohn - Allegro con brio, Sonata 4 J.S.Bach - Wer nur den lieben Gott (Schubler) Rheinberger - Vision Hobart Whitman (1904-1952) - Elegy (1947) Charles Quef (1873-1931) - Noel Parisien (1904) HYMN: a rousing performance of When morning gilds the skies (Laudes Domini - Barnby)   First United Church, Boulder - Bruce Stevens, another welcome regular at these conventions. The organ: Frank Roosevelt, No. 382, built in 1888 - a gutsy 3 manual instrument of about 35 stops. The program, a stolid collection of music, none of which I had heard before, full of interest, and beautifully played.   Andre Fleury - Variations on a Burgundian Noel "When, in the frosty season" Soler - Pair of Sonatas: E minor, G Major Fr. Davide da Bergamo (1750-1830) - Sonatina for Offertory or Post Communion (a cross between Lefebure-Wely, all those pieces in the Schirmer Sonatina Album, and the Ives Variations on America!!) Joseph Bonnet - Second Legend, Opus 7, No. 10 Joseph Jongen - Cantabile, Opus 37, No. 1 Rheinberger - Sonata No. 5 in F-sharp Major, Opus 111 HYMN: I vow to thee, my country (Thaxted - Gustav Holst)   Next came the great climb up to Central City, at 8,500 feet. It was on this leg of the journey that our bus driver began to think he was appreciated as a wit. I think some people down front encouraged him. He is also passionately fond of trains. We were "treated" to more and more bad jokes, and every time we crossed or were near a railroad track, we received a whole history lesson about all the trains that might have passed that way, with their complete history. All the buses have names of organbuilders to identify them. I must move from Steere to perhaps Hook & Hastings, since I play one every Sunday!   St. James United Methodist Church, Central City - Jane Edge. As you will see below, she manages to find totally unusual programs - I thought I knew nothing on her list, but did discover that I recognized Narcissus, which I think I must have played on the piano as a child. The whole recital was great fun, played with spirit, and with registrations that showed careful thought, therefore showing off this charming instrument beautifully. The organ: J. W. Steere and Son, Opus 456, 1899. Sixteen stops. The program: HYMN: Praise, my soul, the King of Heaven (Lauda Anima) for the second time, but one can never get enough! F. Opel (??) - Opening Voluntary (arranged from Farmer's Mass) Ole Bull (1810-1880) - Solitude on the Mountain (arranged for organ by Claude F. Saunier) W. Hewitt (??) - French Air With Variations - The Air turned out to be Twinkle twinkle, little star! Lady Susi used to play a set of variations on the tune - I wonder if this was the one. Igor Stravinsky (1882-1971) - Berceuse from The Firebird (arranged for organ by J. T. Quarles) Horatio Parker (1862-1919) - Impromptu, Opus 17, No. 2 Ethelbert Nevin (1862-1901) - arr. for organ by Reginald Goss-Custard 1. The Rosary 2. Narcissus Easthope Martin (d. 1928) - Evensong Franz Liszt (1811-1886) - Adagio George Eldbridge Whiting (1840-1923) - Onward, Christian Soldiers, something I would love to do as a postlude at home - possibly on my very last Sunday!!   A walk down the hill to St. Paul's Episcopal Church, a fine-looking stone building, with a rather chaotic interior. The Anglican Spirit greeted us right inside the door, where we were offered iced Capaccino (which I know I am misspelling, but have no access to a dictionary) and lots of cookies, and a big collection basket seeded with dollar bills already. I am not sure I know what to make of one little drama, to wit: A woman offering the drinks and cookies made a little plea for generous contributions as "there are only 20 of us trying to keep this church going," at which point she was immediately corrected by a man nearby. "It's only 18 now!" We were well and truly crammed into this church, with people standing all around. The charming James Mosby Bratton, retired U. of Denver professor whom we had heard talk at the Paramount the day before, had prepared a recital on a Mason & Risch Vocalion (a "first class reed organ"), No. 1033 (1893). He had some help with pumping, which, in line with a recent discussion on PipOrg-L about organs at high altitudes, was apparently much more strenuous at 8,500 feet, given the thin air. We began by singing a song, Colorado Home, to the tune of "Home on the range." The rest of the program: J. S. Bach - Prelude in d minor (BWV539) William Willing - General Custer's Funeral March, Opus 43 Louis Adolphe Coerne (1870-1922) - Bagatelle, Opus 24, No. 1 Gustav Baumhauser - Pike's Peak March (c. 1875) Lefebure-Wely - Fugue in d minor, Opus 122, No. 6   After this program, we were at liberty to explore the town and find some dinner on our own. Colorado has permitted three dying old mining towns to open casinos, and Central City is full of them. As is true in casinos elsewhere, meals are available at very low prices, and we ate in the dining room above one such, with Prime Rib for about $3. The food was good and plentiful, too. Barbara Owen begged nickels from everyone so she could play a nickel slot machine. Those of you who use these things might understand what it means that she put in her money, pulled the big handle, and the machine said "Bar Bar," which many will know is the nick name by which Barbara is known to her friends.   Winding down the mountain on the bus, we reached the Roman Catholic Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception in Denver, where Fred Hohman delivered himself of lots of bombast, interspersed with some more delicate fare. The room is quite vertical, and despite carpeting everywhere, there is plenty of resonance bouncing off the hard surface walls and ceiling, and plenty of organ sound to do the bouncing! The organ was basically a Kimball, but is now, at least in large part, a new 3-manual instrument of about 35 stops by Ivan P. Morel & Associates, a well-regarded area builder. Fred, who is well-known for his skill as a transcriber, played a program entirely of works originally for the organ, as follows:   Vierne - Symphony No. 2 in E, Opus 20 Allegro Scherzo Vierne - Naiades (pieces de Fantaisie, Fourth Suite, Opus 55) Franck - Choral No. 2 in B minor Widor - Finale from the Sixth Symphony Marcel Dupre - The World Awaiting the Savior (Symphonie-Passion) Langlais - Cantilene (Suite Breve) Mulet - Tu es Petra (Byzantine Sketches) Maurice Durufle - Sicilienne and Toccata (Suite, Opus 5)   Tomorrow, a day of great musical potential, staying in Denver all day.   (A very tired) Malcolm Wechsler