PipeChat Digest #424 - Wednesday, June 24, 1998
 
First-Plymouth Lied Schoenstein
  by "lchurst" <lchurst@binary.net>
OHS Conv - X-POST
  by "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com>
Re: OHS Conv - X-POST
  by "Jenny Moon" <bfus7@central.susx.ac.uk>
Re: OHS Conv - X-POST
  by "Jenny Moon" <bfus7@central.susx.ac.uk>
Re: OHS Conv - X-POST
  by <danbel@earthlink.net>
War march of the priests.
  by "Jenny Moon" <bfus7@central.susx.ac.uk>
Re: Wedding Tape
  by "Vernon Moeller" <vernonm@ccsi.com>
Web Site Debut!
  by <danbel@earthlink.net>
Re: Pentecost 3, Proper 7, Westbury NY (x-post)
  by "George Husson" <george_husson@hotmail.com>
Re: OHS Conv - X-POST
  by "Ron Yost" <musik@tcsn.net>
Same Old, Same Old, at Weddings
  by "Vernon Moeller" <vernonm@ccsi.com>
RE: Same Old, Same Old, at Weddings
  by "Wildhirt, Richard" <Richard.Wildhirt@PSS.Boeing.com>
Re: I REFUSE to play.....
  by "Shirley" <pnst@itw.com>
Re: I REFUSE to play.....
  by <danbel@earthlink.net>
Re: Pentecost 3, Proper 7, Westbury NY (x-post)
  by <mewzishn@spec.net>
George Husson
  by <Cantuar@aol.com>
Re: I REFUSE to play.....
  by "Ian B. McLean" <solotibia@enternet.com.au>
First-Plymouth Lied Schoenstein, error 404; OOPS!
  by "lchurst" <lchurst@binary.net>
OHS Denver - Day 3 -  X Posted
  by <ManderUSA@aol.com>
 


(back) Subject: First-Plymouth Lied Schoenstein From: "lchurst" <lchurst@binary.net> Date: Tue, 23 Jun 1998 06:35:10 -0500   Greetings list,   Just a quick note to let all know that installation of the Lied Schoenstein organ is now complete. We now expect a good deal of time to be spent with tonal finishing.   We have one photo of the organ that was taken while we had highlighting for the pipes! We should be able to have a photo shortly with the finished apse area, when the lighting is restored. Each step of the way on this project has been like watching an episode of "This Old House" - "This Old Church building" yielded surprises continually, delaying the installation whenever possible!   First-Plymouth now has its own web domain, www.firstplymouth.org that I encourage all to use to get to the organ page. The church site is undergoing fine tuning as I write this, so bear with that construction also! We have moved the organ and carillon pages from my account to church at the same server, but accessing it at the old address, http://www.binary.net/lchurst/organs will automatically forward you. Of topical interest also would be the Abendmusik: Lincoln schedule for 1998-1999; several programs that include our new organ are planned. We are still experimenting trying to get some sound clips on the organ page, but my main priority is the church site and photos of the organ.   Please let us know if some of the newer photos, especially the those of the drawknobs are readable. I was only able to test the appearance on three different browsers and monitors where it looked acceptable. If need be I may be able to get an architectural drawing of the layout.   Thanks to all who have visited the page, and for the suggestions and requests that have made this site what it has grown to today. I never thought this would mushroom to what it is now!   Lou Hurst, maintainer lchurst@binary.net http://www.binary.net/lchurst    
(back) Subject: OHS Conv - X-POST From: David Scribner <david@blackiris.com> Date: Tue, 23 Jun 1998 08:10:25 -0500   In conjunction with Malcolm's postings of his reports from the OHS Convention, I have been taking photos and getting them put on a web page along with a copy of the daily report.   For those who are interested the daily reports can be found at: http://www.ohs-florida.org/conv98   Enjoy   David      
(back) Subject: Re: OHS Conv - X-POST From: Jenny Moon <bfus7@central.susx.ac.uk> Date: Tue, 23 Jun 1998 14:37:37 BST     I have tried several times to reach this site and each time I am told it is an invalid host. Is this the right address or am I doing something wrong.   Regards.   Jen.   bfus7@central.sussex.ac.uk   > For those who are interested the daily reports can be found at: > http://www.ohs-florida.org/conv98 > > Enjoy > > David >      
(back) Subject: Re: OHS Conv - X-POST From: Jenny Moon <bfus7@central.susx.ac.uk> Date: Tue, 23 Jun 1998 14:39:46 BST     Typical!:) I tried again after I posted my last question, and it worked. Sorry to have bothered you all.   > For those who are interested the daily reports can be found at: > http://www.ohs-florida.org/conv98 > > Enjoy > > David > >      
(back) Subject: Re: OHS Conv - X-POST From: danbel@earthlink.net Date: Tue, 23 Jun 1998 09:49:04 -0400   At 02:37 PM 6/23/98 BST, you wrote: > >I have tried several times to reach this site and each time I am told >it is an invalid host. Is this the right address or am I doing >something wrong.   >> For those who are interested the daily reports can be found at: >> http://www.ohs-florida.org/conv98 >>     It just worked fine for me Jen!   djb    
(back) Subject: War march of the priests. From: Jenny Moon <bfus7@central.susx.ac.uk> Date: Tue, 23 Jun 1998 14:50:07 BST     WAR MARCH OF THE PRIESTS. F.MENDELSSOHN.   I have an organ arrangement of this piece and it is very good and comes in handy very often, but was it written for organ in the first place? I think not. I always thought it was for orchestra and the arrangement for organ came later, but try telling our new curate that!:)   Please correct me or back me up on this one.   Jen. <bfus7@central.sussex.ac.uk>      
(back) Subject: Re: Wedding Tape From: Vernon Moeller <vernonm@ccsi.com> Date: Tue, 23 Jun 1998 09:29:26 -0500   Jen & Pipechatters:   Just wanted to second what Pat said about wedding tapes. I carry 3 copies of my wedding excerpt tape in my music case wherever I go. At the beginning of the tape is a 4-minute oration (well, actually, I read it) in which I compare and contrast wedding processionals and recessionals. During my little speech, I tell the listeners that some of the processionals, if sped up a bit, make delightful recessionals, and vice-versa. I then announce the title and composer of each of the pieces I play, just before I play them. I play all the processionals first, pause a few moments, and then move on to the recessionals. All in all, I play excerpts of about 20 pieces.   Most importantly, I tell the listeners that I am playing the organ at Bethany UMC, so that they can tell roughly what it will sound like for their wedding, if they're gettin' hitched at BUMC.   I can't begin to tell you how much time it has saved me. I remember a few weddings where I showed up after church, ready for the ordeal of playing bits and pieces of 30 pieces, only to have the happy couple say, "Let's just go traditional with Wagner and Mendelssohn, OK?" Sorta like the soda jerk who recites all 75 Baskin-Robbins flavors, only to have a customer say, "Make mine vanilla."   One couple who borrowed a tape from me was in such a hurry that they went out to their car, stuck it in their tape player and listened to it while eating burgers at a Sonic drive-in eatery. They returned it only an hour or so after they left, one less premarital task completed.   Recently, I began charging a $25 deposit for the tape, to ensure that it would be returned intact. One couple - I don't remember who - returned my tape with big smiles and lots of thanks. I didn't bother to listen to it until after their wedding, when they were well on their way to their new home in Barcelona, Spain. Somehow, they copied 90 minutes of Kiss, the R&R group, onto my tape. Even though I recopied my master onto it, you could still hear Kiss, so I had to toss out that tape and replace it with a new one. Nowadays, I tell couples that they can either have their $25 back when they return the tape, or that I'll just knock it off my regular fees. So far, nobody has asked for the former option.   On related matters, I do have a question: do any of you send out letters outlining your wedding music policies to the bride? This might cover appropriate music, fees, rehearsal time availability, etc. If so, would you please email me a copy? Some of my wedding rehearsals run 2 hours or more because we either end up waiting for somebody who's fighting their way through rush-hour traffic, or we have an inexperienced minister (not Methodist, I assure you!) who insists on rehearsing the service word for word, at least two, maybe three times.   Thanks, \/\/\    
(back) Subject: Web Site Debut! From: danbel@earthlink.net Date: Tue, 23 Jun 1998 10:44:01 -0400   Greetings all--   Just wanted to invite you to drop by to check out my new web site! It is still very much under construction but I hope you will feel free to make constructive suggestions if you desire.   I intend to expand it a good bit in the next few weeks so please drop by often to see what's new!   http://www.zyworld.com/danbel   Thanks to all and have a great day! :)   Dan    
(back) Subject: Re: Pentecost 3, Proper 7, Westbury NY (x-post) From: "George Husson" <george_husson@hotmail.com> Date: Tue, 23 Jun 1998 10:29:52 PDT   Ken, was this John Rutter's "Down by the Riverside?" I just heard a recording of it yesterday and it is a real hoot!   --George Husson Director of Music at St. Sebastian the Martyr Greenbrae (San Francisco), CA     ----Original Message Follows---- Date: Sun, 21 Jun 1998 23:44:02 +0000 From: mewzishn@spec.net Reply-To: "PipeChat" <pipechat@pipechat.org> To: 1@1 Subject: Pentecost 3, Proper 7, Westbury NY (x-post) x-mac-creator="4D4F5353"   Third Sunday after Pentecost (Proper 7) 21st June 1998, 11.00 am, Rite II Church of the Advent, Westbury, New York The Rev'd Jeffrey Hoyt Krantz, rector Kenneth L. Sybesma, choirmaster and organist     Voluntary, “Herzlich tut mich erfreuen" (Eleven Chorale Preludes) Johannes Brahms * Hymn at the Entering Procession, Nettleton ("Come, thou fount of every blessing") Gloria in excelsis Deo, Intercession Mass (David Hurd) Hymn at the Gospel Procession, "Jesus Keep Me Near the Cross" Voluntary at the Presentation, "Allemande (Suite in D)" A. Nonymous ** Hymn at the Preparation, "The Old Rugged Cross" Sanctus et Benedictus, Mass for a Soulful People (Grayson Warren Brown) Lord's Prayer, Malotte Confractoria, "Agnus Dei" Eucharist of the Soul (Lena McLin) Voluntary at the Holy Communion, "Prelude, Op. 28, No. 4 [E minor]" (piano) Frederic Chopin Hymn at the Ablutions, "Jesus Loves Me" Hymn at the Retiring Procession, "Down By the Riverside" *** Improvisation     It being the third Sunday of the month, it is parish custom to use "Lift Every Voice and Sing II" for hymns and music of the liturgy.   * Couldn't think of a single more appropriate piece to play on the day of the summer solstice. From the poem "Fruehlingsblumen" the first line of the text is "Herzlich tut mich erfreuen die fröhliche Sommerzeit."   ** Easily the world's most prolific composer!!! : )   *** What a hoot'n'holler hymn this was -- about as close to happy-clappy as this place ever gets, and makes for a great improvisation theme.               "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org         ______________________________________________________ Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com  
(back) Subject: Re: OHS Conv - X-POST From: Ron Yost <musik@tcsn.net> Date: Tue, 23 Jun 1998 10:19:37 -0700   No bother, Jen! :) Happy it worked for you!   I was just going to post that it worked fine for me, but got beat to the punch! :)   Ohhhh weeellll ...   Ron Yost, Paso Robles, Calif.    
(back) Subject: Same Old, Same Old, at Weddings From: Vernon Moeller <vernonm@ccsi.com> Date: Tue, 23 Jun 1998 14:00:49 -0500   I agree with the idea that playing the same pieces over and over is part of an organist's job and that (s)he should learn to accept the probable boredom associated with repetitious playing.   However, I would also suggest that those of you who are tired of the same old same old do something different from time to time: change your registration, set up performance parameters known only to you (ie, use a GT foundation stop for solos, with an accompaniment on the SW, instead of vice-versa (perhaps you will have to play the foundation stop an octave higher or lower to obtain the desired effect) ). Pity the poor orchestral performer who plays the same single line of music, over and over. Fortunately (?), I don't have to play a lot of weddings, but when I do, and they've chosen Here Comes the Bride (Wagner) or There Goes the Bride (Mendelssohn), it's usually like a walk in the park - except for watching the progress of the bride coming down the aisle, I can usually switch on autopilot and let my fingers do the thinking and the playing. It's usually quite easy.   Hope I've helped somebody.   \/\/\    
(back) Subject: RE: Same Old, Same Old, at Weddings From: "Wildhirt, Richard" <Richard.Wildhirt@PSS.Boeing.com> Date: Tue, 23 Jun 1998 13:13:32 -0700   > From: Vernon Moeller[SMTP:vernonm@ccsi.com] > I agree with the idea that playing the same pieces over and over is > part of > an organist's job and that (s)he should learn to accept the probable > boredom associated with repetitious playing. > > However, I would also suggest that those of you who are tired of the > same > old same old do something different from time to time: change your > registration, set up performance parameters known only to you > Well said, Vern. That's what I've turned to to relieve the monotony. I've lost track of how many different registrations I've used for the Canon in D (strings celeste, flutes, principals with the box closed--haven't been bold enough to try a reed chorus yet) and Jesu, Joy's melody line (trumpet, krummhorn, flute & mutation, chimes). We organist have at our command the King of Instruments--a paradox--to use to its full and various advantage. No other instrument can be used in such a way. Such versatility at our fingertips should hardly allow boredom, monotony, and repetition to even be an issue.   Now, if you'll excuse me, I have to continue work on using the sleigh bells on Also Sprach Zarathustra.  
(back) Subject: Re: I REFUSE to play..... From: Shirley <pnst@itw.com> Date: Tue, 23 Jun 1998 16:18:14 -0400   At 11:22 AM 6/23/98 +1000, Ian wrote: >I have been able to observe on three trips to the U.S. successful pizza >parlours and their organists. I found it fascinating that those who >didn't simply "throw away" the numbers, could, and often did, capture >the audience. Two of those were Dan Bellomy, and Ron Rhode.   Who played at Portland? Beautiful place, great organ, pizza wasn't bad. Was Jonas Nordwall on staff there? Now THERE's a musician who can entertain the masses and still sound good to other musicians.   >So, IMHO, you did do the right thing in bowing out. Just as I did in >1986. There are always others out there who can fill the gaps, many >without chucking out their musical integrity.   Exactly. And I wasn't one of them. Took me a whole lotta years to acknowledge that about myself.   --Shirley  
(back) Subject: Re: I REFUSE to play..... From: danbel@earthlink.net Date: Tue, 23 Jun 1998 16:53:42 -0400     >Ian wrote: > I found it fascinating that those who >>didn't simply "throw away" the numbers, could, and often did, capture >>the audience. Two of those were Dan Bellomy, and Ron Rhode. > > Who played at Portland? Beautiful place, great organ, pizza wasn't >bad. >Was Jonas Nordwall on staff there? Now THERE's a musician who can >entertain the masses and still sound good to other musicians.   Who played at Portland? I did for one! :) Ian can correct me if I am incorrect but I believe that when he was at the Organ Grinder, Jonas was no longer on the organist staff. Jonas only played on special occasions.   Dan Bellomy    
(back) Subject: Re: Pentecost 3, Proper 7, Westbury NY (x-post) From: mewzishn@spec.net Date: Tue, 23 Jun 1998 18:23:21 +0000   George Husson wrote:   > Ken, was this John Rutter's "Down by the Riverside?" I just heard a > recording of it yesterday and it is a real hoot!   Didn't know Rutter had a version (he has a version of everything else, so why not? ( : ), but this started out in "Lift Every Voice and Sing 2" the so-called "African-American" hymnal for the Episcopal church, but no one sings it like it's in the hymnal, so we just sort of took off with it, the congregation singing it the way they expected, me playing the way I expected, and miraculously they were the same expectations. What's most fun about the music, though, is that it lends itself well to all manner of treatments in improvisation from slow to fast, swing or shuffle or jazz or blooozie or French toccata.   Ken Sybesma        
(back) Subject: George Husson From: <Cantuar@aol.com> Date: Tue, 23 Jun 1998 18:37:59 EDT   I zapped a piece of mail to this list by a George Husson who was from St Sebastian's Church near San Francisco. The name of the church intrigued me, and I wanted to write him directly to ask for details of it, but I no longer have that e mail address.  
(back) Subject: Re: I REFUSE to play..... From: "Ian B. McLean" <solotibia@enternet.com.au> Date: Wed, 24 Jun 1998 09:49:18 +1000   danbel@earthlink.net wrote:   > Who played at Portland? I did for one! :) Ian can correct me if I am > incorrect but I believe that when he was at the Organ Grinder, Jonas was no > longer on the organist staff. Jonas only played on special occasions.   True. That is why I didn't mention Jonas. I did hear him on the instrument, but out of hours. I was actually a house guest of Nancy and Jonas', along with Rob Gliddon from Sydney, on that trip. But, as I wrote, I DID get to hear Dan doing the hard yakka (as we would say down under).   Ian McLean  
(back) Subject: First-Plymouth Lied Schoenstein, error 404; OOPS! From: "lchurst" <lchurst@binary.net> Date: Tue, 23 Jun 1998 22:09:48 -0500   My apologies, BinaryNet likes to see the "full address" of a page when it's not titled "index.htm". The old, "full" address for the First-Plymouth organs is http://www.binary.net/lchurst/organs.htm . The new, direct address is http://www.firstplymouth.org/organs/index.html . Hope that helps everyone who got the Error 404 message. Sorry for the inconvenience!!   Lou Hurst, maintainer lchurst@binary.net http://www.binary.net/lchurst    
(back) Subject: OHS Denver - Day 3 - X Posted From: <ManderUSA@aol.com> Date: Wed, 24 Jun 1998 02:11:39 EDT   Dear Lists, and Others,   It was the third day, and he saw that it was pretty good.   At the Scottish Rite Masonic Temple, three stars were in evidence: Richard Purvis, Kenneth Matthews, and the mighty Kimball, and they all worked together for good. Kenneth was a student of Purvis, and also presided over another great Kimball, at a Christian Science Church in San Francisco for some time - so he came to his task with experience. This 1924, 3 manual Kimball, very much a theatre style instrument, is located all over the ceiling, but despite what look like relatively small places for tonal egress, it has immense impact. It appears to be about 18 stops, unified and extended all over the place. I have been glancing at stoplists in the convention book for the last few days (and for much of my life!), counting the number of stops going down the right column where are listed the number of pipes. With the big Skinners, church Kimball organs, and others, there is a number given for pipes after almost every stop. The countdown here was quite simple, as there are tons of blanks - no numbers at all after the stop name, and as I was adding up the real stops, I had a bit of a start when I came to the Pedal, with ten stop names, and not one single (dedicated) pipe to list. This is not a comment on unification and extension - we have dealt with this here to distraction. It is a given that the technique is essential to the theatre organ style and sound. While we are not keen to hear Franck and Buxtehude on these organs, they make a tremendous mark musically in what they were designed to play. Kenneth Matthews knew exactly what to do to demonstrate all the virtues, using as a vehicle Christmas music of Purvis. We could not have asked for a better demonstration of the organ's resources, including the Bass Drum, Chinese Gong, Harp, and Chimes. The program, all Purvis: Prelude Solennel (Veni Immanuel) Offertory (Resonet in Laudibus) Communion (Gaevaert) Carillon (Puer Nobis Nascitur) Greensleeves (from Four Carol Preludes) Pastorale (Forest Green - from 7 Chorale Preludes on Tunes Found in American Hymnals) HYMN: O come, all ye faithful, with our sopranos having some success with the Willcox descant from memory. Carol Rhapsody   We walked across the street to the First Baptist Church of Denver, to hear a large organ built originally in 1945 by Aeolian-Skinner for the ubiquitous Senator Emerson Richards, of New Jersey. By 1949, he was tired of it, bought a replacement, and Opus 1047 was sold to the Denver Baptists. If it sounded in New Jersey as it now sounds in Denver, I have no problem understanding the Senator's wish to replace it. In Denver, it is buried in chambers, and speaks out only with difficulty. I could not help wondering if our ears ever thought that was a wonderful sound! To be fair, there may be beauty in small combinations and solo stops, but we never did get to hear any of them. Raymond Garner chose a program that basically featured full organ primarily, not this organ's happiest mode. The program:   Richard Wagner - Fanfares from Parsifal, arr. Virgil Fox Widor - Allegro from the Sixth Symphony HYMN: Behold a Sower, to the tune Weymouth is full of verbal phrasing opportunities, running charmingly counter to the musical phrases, and all of these were ignored, along with much of the meaning of the words. Many wondered out loud why we had visited this place, but it had to be a combination of proximity and history involving the good senator.   Looking very ministerial, if not Baptist, Jonathan Ambrosino took the lectern, and delivered himself of a splendid lecture entitled "The Transition from the Symphonic to the English Ensemble 1925-1940: Denver's Response to a National Trend." I do hope the text of this will become available - I have no doubt it will. There were many pithy paths explored - two stick in my mind now. The first had to do with Skinner's idea that electric action freed him from a sort of tyranny of the Great Organ, which in mechanical organ days, was the essential major voice of the instrument. Now, any stops could be put anywhere, and all gathered to the Great as wanted. No more heavy tracker coupling. Everything became equal. Referring to Emerson Richards, as he often did of necessity, Jonathan suggested that the beyond-immense Atlantic City Convention Hall organ was the world's greatest senatorial filibuster! We will await the book eagerly, Jonathan.   We had a pleasant lunch at the Temple Events Center Uptown, a former Jewish Temple. We could see but not hear the 1911 Estey with two similar cases. Imagine two large auditoria side-by-side, completely open to each other at the point of joining. In each of these auditoria is a platform, and a choir loft above with an organ case. There is only one console, at the case to the right. One assumes that the left side auditorium was for the great overflow of the High Holy Days, and that this was a clever, if expensive, way to provide equal organ coverage in both places. After the Temple sold the building in 1955, it went through a couple of Pentecostal congregations, and after the last of those gave it up, a foundation was created to keep the building intact, and to encourage its use for various cultural and community purposes.   Our next stop, the fine former Second Church of Christ, Scientist, now The Spiritual Assembly of the Baha'is of Denver. Baha'i worship makes no use of the organ, and the congregation had plans to try to sell it, but the local OHS gang stepped in, and made a case, successfully it would seem, that the organ should be preserved in situ. The Baha'i community has now embraced the instrument, and is planning a concert series in which it can be heard. That this large (3-manual, 34-stops) and wonderful Hook & Hastings, Opus 2370 of 1916, is worthy of preservation was more than amply demonstrated in a fine recital by Charles Rus, from San Francisco. He registered with wonderful care and imagination, enabling us to hear just about every possible combination of sounds. The program:   Howells - Master Tallis' Testament Schumann - No. 1 in C and No. 4 in D-flat of the Four Sketches for Pedal Piano. HYMN: Creation Spirit, by whose breath (Herr Jesu Christ, Dich zu Uns Wend), with us singing the four stanzas of the hymn, one each after each of four variations on this tune by Georg Bohm. We sang in unison the nasty rhythmic version found in the ELCA Green Menace. How lovely it would have been for us all, glorious harmonists as we have proven ourselves to be, to have sung a four-part chorale harmonization - there must be one by J. S. himself - but I realize that may be considered political talk. Craig Phillips (b. 1961) - Fantasy: Torah Song (Yisrael Voraita)   In yet another event demonstrating well the beauty of an old instrument, Dana Robinson of Davenport Iowa played the following program in the South Gate Masonic Lodge Hall:   Widor - Praeludium Circulaire from Symphony No. 2 Boely - Andante con moto Mozart - An Andante for a Cylinder in a Little Organ (K 616) Mozart - Lasst uns mit geschlungnen Handen (Let us now with joined hands), appropriately from "A Little Freemason Cantata." Liszt - Ave Maria von Arcadelt HYMN: The spacious firmament on high, on which I thought we did quite well. and then, in a further inspired choice, Handel - Variations in E - (The Harmonious Blacksmith). The Organ - a tiny (7 stop) Ferrand & Votey, Opus 776, c. 1897 - made lots of music this day!!   Next stop, the Iliff Theological Seminary Chapel (that's ILIFF), to hear a rich and satisfying 1910 Wirsching Organ of 16 stops. Richard Robertson, Denver, played the following program, which showed off the great power and variety of this instrument: David Hurd - Suite in Three Movements (commissioned for this convention). 1. Majestically 2. Slowly 3. Playfully Reger - Benedictus Peter Warlock - from Capriol Suite 1. Pavane and Basse 2. Danse Mendelssohn - Prelude & Fugue in F Minor, Opus 35   After dinner at our hotel, we were carted back to St. John's Cathedral to hear the perfect match of music, instrument, and musician. I do believe that Thomas Murray is one of the most thorough of all performers in working out registration, and will limitlessly complicate his time at the console, if it means getting just the right effect. He also listens, as do very few, to what the instrument and building are telling him about tempo, texture, and touch. In addition to which, there is no more sensitive swell pedal foot in the organ world. We, and a large audience of non-OHS types as well, were the beneficiaries of all that work, in the following lovely program:   Bach - Sinfonia from Cantata No. 29 Saint-Saens - Prelude & Fugue in B Major Sir Edward Elgar - Severn Suite, Opus 87 (1932) transcribed by Thomas Murray Introduction (Worcester Castle) Toccata (Tournament) Fugue (Cathedral) Minuet (Commandery) Coda   After a short intermission, Barbara Owen presented to the Junior Warden of the Cathedral, the OHS Plaque awarded to churches that have "instruments worthy of preservation," and have kept them well - certainly a well-deserved honor in this place.   Andre Fleury - Variations on a Burgundian Noel (heard earlier in the week). HYMN: Come down, O love divine (Down Ampney) - we raised the roof!! Rheinberger - Sonata No. 13, Opus 161 ENCORE: The last of Saint-Saens Seven Improvisations, Opus 150 (I hope I heard that announcement correctly).   Sitting near George Bozeman always brings out the worst in me! I was musing during the hymn about a little puppy I have been raising, and trying to persuade not to jump on people, and it occurred to me that the next puppy should be named Ampney, so I can go around saying Down Ampney, Down Ampney. Apologizing sincerely for that lapse, I sign this respectfully, Malcolm Wechsler. Tomorrow we spend much of the day more than 10,000 feet above sea level - Gasp!