PipeChat Digest #427 - Friday, June 26, 1998
 
Re: Books
  by "Kurt Kehler" <kmkehler@compuserve.com>
Re: Hot weather and C-3's
  by "Kurt Kehler" <kmkehler@compuserve.com>
Re: Koopman/Mathot-Concert at Kiedrich [long]
  by "Peggy C. Bie" <peggyb@gate.net>
Re: Psalm 150:4
  by "Roger Pariseau" <grinder@west.net>
Re: Webster's New World [was Psalm 150:4]
  by "Stanley Lowkis" <nstarfil@MediaOne.net>
Re: Hot weather and C-3's
  by <GRSCoLVR@aol.com>
Re: Webster's New World [was Psalm 150:4]
  by "Dr. Edward Peterson" <epeterso@madison.tdsnet.com>
Re: Webster's New World [was Psalm 150:4]
  by "Stanley Lowkis" <nstarfil@MediaOne.net>
Re: Psalm 150:4
  by "Kurt Kehler" <kmkehler@compuserve.com>
Re: Webster's New World [was Psalm 150:4]
  by "Dr. Edward Peterson" <epeterso@madison.tdsnet.com>
OHS Denver - Day 5 - X Post
  by <ManderUSA@aol.com>
Re: Webster's New World [was Psalm 150:4]
  by "Peggy C. Bie" <peggyb@gate.net>
 


(back) Subject: Re: Books From: "Kurt Kehler" <kmkehler@compuserve.com> Date: Fri, 26 Jun 1998 00:38:57 -0400   Jason,   Which Catholic hymnal did you find?   Kurt (a Lutheran who has spent the last eight years in Catholic churches)   >I have a Catholoc Hymnal that my father found in a dumpster at work. >It's got a whole bunch of markings and other things written in it. It >was still in GREAT shape and It wasn't being used. So, I'm the possesor >of it now.              
(back) Subject: Re: Hot weather and C-3's From: "Kurt Kehler" <kmkehler@compuserve.com> Date: Fri, 26 Jun 1998 00:49:52 -0400   Do you ever have to change the oil in a Hammond, or do you just keep adding it? Are there different grades of Hammond oil for hot and cold weather?   Kurt (who just finished changing the winter air in his car tires for summer air)     On Thu, 25 Jun 1998 19:30:08 -0400, GRSCoLVR@aol.com wrote:   >HiYa Ed! Thanks for the reminder! Just oiled the C-3 the A, the B-3 AND the >D, also oiled the blower on the Odell and the Estey,,AND the Austin,,,,,well >Thanks much for the lubrication reminder,,,,,hot weather oiling for the >Hammonds is supposed to be good fer em....... >            
(back) Subject: Re: Koopman/Mathot-Concert at Kiedrich [long] From: "Peggy C. Bie" <peggyb@gate.net> Date: Fri, 26 Jun 1998 00:44:59 -0400   To Paul Valtos   It's a small world. My husband was an AF Captain too. My son was born in the Wiesbaden military hospital in 1962. I didn't visit that church, but it sounds like it was impressive because of the reverberation. Don't you hate what carpets and seat cusions can do to the sound of an organ? Peggy C. Bie   http://www.geocities.com/CapitolHill/Senate/1095  
(back) Subject: Re: Psalm 150:4 From: Roger Pariseau <grinder@west.net> Date: Thu, 25 Jun 1998 22:19:35 -0700   Kevin Cartwright wrote: > Shirley wrote:   > > Kevin, not even in Psalm 150????? > Well, I'll be!   My Bible Program spat out the following on a search on "organ":   Ge 4:21 And his brother's name was Jubal: he was the father of all such as handle the harp and organ.   Job 21:12 They take the timbrel and harp, and rejoice at the sound of the organ.   Job 30:31 My harp also is turned to mourning, and my organ into the voice of them that weep.   Ps 150:4 Praise him with the timbrel and dance: praise him with stringed instruments and organs.   Hey, we could be in for a nice musicologist vs. bible scholar debate here! Genesis is right old, I'm led to understand.   Then again, it could simply be the result of Middle Ages Monk-eying around but then I'd run afoul of the Fundamentalists. And anyhow those monks weren't usually so restrained. . . .(oops! da debbil made me do it!).   Personally my guess is that "organ" refers to the flute-like instruments that have proliferated since Day One (or is that Day Six?).   [I really should behave! 8-/ ]   -- Roger  
(back) Subject: Re: Webster's New World [was Psalm 150:4] From: Stanley Lowkis <nstarfil@MediaOne.net> Date: Fri, 26 Jun 1998 01:25:24 -0400   mewzishn@spec.net wrote: > > Kevin Cartwright wrote: > > > Timbrel: yes (i.e. Vox Humana, some upper Tibias sound "creepily" like > > it too) > > Timbrels are, if memory serves me, drums. What did you think they were? >   "timbrel - an ancient type of tambourine"   > The "organ" mentioned in 150:4 was probably something like a set of > panpipes. No keyboards, no stops, no windway or reservoir (except that > within the body of the player). >   "organ - [Archaic] any musical instrument; esp., a wind instrument"     Ken goes to the head of the class. For extra credit: who knows what a "hydraulis" is?     Stan "The Organ Question Man"  
(back) Subject: Re: Hot weather and C-3's From: <GRSCoLVR@aol.com> Date: Fri, 26 Jun 1998 01:27:58 EDT   Kurt: Hammond oil is a good grade of non-parifinnic base light machine oil,,,and No ,,,its never changed,,,,Hammonds are oiled by capillary action of sewing thread one end of which dips into a trough of oil,,,and the other end is wrapped around a brass bearing, when one puts the correct amount of oil twice a year into the oil cups,,,it travels down the trough, and the threads pick it up and capillary it to the bearings,,hence completing the oiling . The troughs are never meant to be kept full of oil,,,and the cups that one dumps the oil into that conveys it to the troughs empty themselves in a matter of hours after one dumps it in,,, the oil vaporizes slowly over a period of time,,,,and the necessity of using non-paraffin oil is so that the vaporized oil will not leave a residue behind which will impede the oil transfer thru the threads. This has been my impressions of Hammond oiling over a 50 year period,,,however,,,,we should get off the subject I guess lest the flames start to rise uncontrollably from mentioning the "H" word..... One of my Hammond organs is now 60 years old,,,the same age as me,,,,and still going strong, as strong as it ever went anyway! For what they were,,,,,,they were good. IMHO,,,of course!!! Earlier this week,,,on a pipe organ repair job that I was doing,,,I used a flute rank that was highly unitized,,,and using it at 16, 8,4,2,and 1' and utilizing the manual 16 and 4 couplers,,,Lo and behold,,,it sounded quite like a Hammond. Gosh,,,and the roof didnt fall in on the church either,,,,   Roc  
(back) Subject: Re: Webster's New World [was Psalm 150:4] From: epeterso@madison.tdsnet.com (Dr. Edward Peterson) Date: Fri, 26 Jun 1998 00:31:24 -0500   On Fri, 26 Jun 1998 01:25:24 -0400, Stanley Lowkis <nstarfil@MediaOne.net> wrote:   <CHOP> >Ken goes to the head of the class. >For extra credit: who knows what a "hydraulis" is?   Water-you offering for a prize?   E/      
(back) Subject: Re: Webster's New World [was Psalm 150:4] From: Stanley Lowkis <nstarfil@MediaOne.net> Date: Fri, 26 Jun 1998 01:56:47 -0400   Dr. Edward Peterson wrote: > > On Fri, 26 Jun 1998 01:25:24 -0400, Stanley Lowkis > <nstarfil@MediaOne.net> wrote: > > <CHOP> > >Ken goes to the head of the class. > >For extra credit: who knows what a "hydraulis" is? > > Water-you offering for a prize? >   You will be lionized in an entertainment extravaganza taking place in Rome, Italy titled "Gladiators 1998".   /S  
(back) Subject: Re: Psalm 150:4 From: "Kurt Kehler" <kmkehler@compuserve.com> Date: Fri, 26 Jun 1998 02:03:25 -0400   On Thu, 25 Jun 1998 23:57:49 -0400, mewzishn@spec.net wrote:   >P.S. Scripture does mention the very first baseball game, though. Genesis >1.1, "In the big inning...."   Which was actually the first half of the first day/night doubler-header. For in verse 3 "And God said, Let there be light: and there was light."   Kurt            
(back) Subject: Re: Webster's New World [was Psalm 150:4] From: epeterso@madison.tdsnet.com (Dr. Edward Peterson) Date: Fri, 26 Jun 1998 01:40:19 -0500   On Fri, 26 Jun 1998 01:56:47 -0400, Stanley Lowkis <nstarfil@MediaOne.net> wrote:   <SNIP> >> Water-you offering for a prize? >> > >You will be lionized in an entertainment extravaganza taking place >in Rome, Italy titled "Gladiators 1998".   Sounds a little too much like the Circus Maximus to me... ergo, nosco sed non dictum sum.   "Some people observe, others participate"   E/ (Satisfied with a nice box-seat)  
(back) Subject: OHS Denver - Day 5 - X Post From: <ManderUSA@aol.com> Date: Fri, 26 Jun 1998 03:17:57 EDT   Dear Lists,   We were scheduled for an earlier departure this morning - 8:15 instead of the usual 8:30, but the bus company, creatures of habit, showed up at the usual time. No one would have minded, were it not for the fact that the Pharmacy Association was having its convention beginning today, and in the large lobby where we await the busses, there was laid out a most impressive breakfast spread. Most of us unbreakfasted, tried removing our OHS badges, and looking like Pharmacists, but the tables were well guarded. No luck!   Two things about previous postings: I forgot, in my report on Tom Murray's recital at St. John's Cathedral, to mention the connection between his choice of Down Ampney as the hymn we sang, and the Rheinberger Sonata which followed. The opening six notes of the Rheinberger are identical to those of Down Ampney, except that the 4th and 5th notes in the hymntune are half notes, and are quarters in the Sonata. Neat. In yesterday's post, my oxygen-deprived brain said something like in Leadville, we were 12 miles short of two miles above sea level. That's a good puzzler, which only one sharp-eyed reader (so far), John Mander, called me on. Read 12 feet, as I know most of you will have done.   As I write this, we are bouncing along I-225 South on our way to Colorado Springs, and the Air Force Academy, where, we will hear two organs in the Roman Catholic and Protestant Chapels respectively. If I remember correctly (our book does not explain this), this was one of a couple of places in which the work of designing the instrument and the job of building it were separate contracts that in a state institution, had to be put to tender separately. Walter Sr. won the design contract, and Moller won the building contract. Holtkamp, I believe, voiced and finished the organs. This must have been tense on occasion - perhaps not! As an organ student in New York at the time, I remember us all thinking this was too bizarre for words! Joseph Galema has been at the Academy since 1982, as Music Director of the Cadet Chapels since 1989. He is organist at the Protestant Chapel. He is responsible for ten choirs! His programs, beginning in the Roman Catholic Chapel on the three- manual, 28 stop organ, as follows: J. S. Bach - The Six Schubler Chorales (which saves me a lot of typing - you all know what they are!!). Niels Gade (1817-1890) - Festligt Praludium over Choralen "Lover den Herre" (which sounds like rather more fun in a Scandinavian tongue!).   The Roman Catholic Chapel is the basement of the chapel building, relatively low ceilinged(!), without any really resonance of any kind, but not totally negative either. The Schublers were probably the perfect vehicle for a demonstration. I grew up, organically speaking, on these organs, at Oberlin in the days before the Flentrop invasion, so it is hard to be objective, after four years of being told this was the best and most beautiful, and much about the sound still strikes me as honest and good. What we heard in the Schublers was clear and projecting. Given the less than ideal squat room and even more squat balcony into which the organ is crammed, even the full ensemble was not difficult to bear, and had a not unpleasant impact in the building. I did find the mixtures rather oppressive, and wondered if I was hearing the Great Mixture plus a Scharff, but there is only the one Mixture on the Great, the Positiv has none, and the three-rank mixture on the Swell is called Furniture, which does not promise much impact if coupled to the Great. The Gade piece was a bit of a meander, I thought, not signifying very much, but I know others that did indeed like it. A trumpeter was on hand just to play the choral and a bit more at the end - he did manage to wake up and play a few notes into the choral! I have sat through Mass and concerts at St. Ignatius Loyola in New York, an 1898 building with a wood floor, and very heavy old kneelers, and have, more at Mass than at concerts, been startled by that unique crash made by a falling kneeler. I am sure others have experienced this elsewhere. It usually happens in quiet movements. Our government and our Airforce have the answer. Each kneeler is fitted with a little pneumatic or liquid-filled cylinder to dampen the fall. Given other things discovered by the General Accounting Office in Washington, I suspect each of these probably cost us taxpayers $500, but what a life-enhancing improvement!!!   and then, in the Protestant Chapel on the three-manual, 62-stop instrument: HYMN: All creatures of our God and King (Lasst uns erfreuen). William Mathias - Jubilate - Opus 67, No. 2 John Gardner (b. 1917) - Sonata da Chiesa sopra una tema di Claudio Monteverdi   It's interesting to note that on both organs, the Great and Swell compass is 61 notes, but the Positiv in each case is only 56.   I thought, given the great, soaring space (well worth seeing, inside and out) and a larger instrument (striking to look upon), we would hear something spacious and grand. I found the organ not really supportive in the hymn, nor projecting very well in the Mathias. Here is perhaps an example of a situation in which an encased instrument could really prove itself. In ensemble with two wonderful trumpet players in the Gardner, the organ was at its best - and what a truly amazing and wonderful piece this is, I say, as a long time Gardner fan. The main theme (there may have been others I did not recognize) was the majestic opening of the Coronation of Poppea, which, once heard (and seen), can never be forgotten. What Gardner does with it in four glorious movements is nothing less than magical. I am really grateful to Dr. Galema for bringing this to us. Joan Lippincott arrived today, in preparation for her appearance at the AGO convention, and she sounded like she would not need much persuasion to bring the work to Princeton Chapel.   We bussed to the dining hall at The Colorado College, also in Colorado Springs, for a sumptuous lunch, with many different food stations on offer, with all sorts of food, hot and cold, all one could eat, courtesy of Marriott Catering. I think I went to college too soon.   We walked across campus to Shove Memorial Chapel (I resisted the need to correct a loud person near me who was telling everyone who would listen where Shrove Memorial Chapel was - am I shriven?), wherein Frank Shelton, organist at Grace and St. Stephen's Parish, and College Organist gave us a brilliant program full of interest, after Jonathan Ambrosino presented a "significant organ" plaque to a college official who had been instrumental in keeping the instrument and interest in it alive. The Program: Ralph Simpson (b. 1933) - Fantasy and Fugue on "My Lord, what a morning" (1994) - the program said "Mourning," but it clearly was no such thing. John Knowles Payne - Prelude, Opus 19, No. 2 HYMN: O God, our help in ages past (St. Anne) - The Colorado College Hymn! John Weaver (b. 1937) - Passacaglia on a Theme by Dunstable (1978) - you guessed it, the tune Agincourt Hymn. The Organ: Welte-Tripp Organ Corporation, Sound Beach, Connecticut, Opus 314, 1931 - Three manual, 42-stops. There is a fascinating article in the convention book about this organ, and two names of great interest are involved in the history of the instrument: Richard Whitelegg and Charles Courboin. If you are an OHS member, you will receive a copy of the book, and if you are not, I highly recommend that you buy the book from OHS - it is full of information about a place that is very important in the development of the Pipe Organ in this country. And not at all by the way, the organ sounds really wonderful! I do believe that in some ways, it outdoes some Aeolian-Skinners of that time (1931). I found myself wondering if the Great chorus through mixture was truly of that period. It was silvery and brilliant, and one wonders if it has been playe with.   We walked the few blocks to Grace and St. Stephen's Parish, Episcopal. In my little mental database of "Best Recitals Ever" was one played by Thomas Brown at the OHS Mini-Convention at Round Lake, New York last summer. Now I have to start a Tom Brown file, and put today's recital in beside the other one. It was an Anglophile's Orgy, played as last year, entirely from memory, with everything perfectly in place - beautifully registered and wonderfully musical. There were lots of smiles around, and a spontaneous standing ovulation(!) at the end. The program: Edward Bairstow - Prelude in C Percy Whitlock - Reflections - Three Quiet Pieces for Organ Mendelssohn - Sonata in F minor, Opus 65, No. 1 Karg-Elert - Chorale Prelude on "O Gott, du frommer Gott" Vierne - Naiades Grayston Ives (b. 1948) - Entrata HYMN: Sing we of the Blessed Mother (Rustington - C. H. H. Parry). Methinks me heard the spirit of Henry Willis (Father) rustling around at the first notes of the play-through of this hymn. There are six manual 16' stops on the organ - I think perhaps they were all on!   The organ: Welte (NY) opus 261, 1928. Three-manuals, 49-stops - a splendid organ, of great historic significance, and Frank Shelton, who had played at Shove Chapel, organist of Grace Church, accepted an OHS plaque.   Our next journey was to Manitou Springs, by way of an astonishing natural wonder, a place called The Garden of the Gods - gigantic outcroppings of a beautiful red rock, amongst many evergreens. It was like a very oversized sculpture park - around every corner, as we climbed, was yet another sight to take the breath away. Our goal was the Community Congregational Church, and somehow, we arrived an hour early, and many fanned out to explore the town. Along with some of our group, I settled into the very hospitable public library and with permission, sat and wrote more of these notes, until the sound of the church bell across the street summoned us to the recital. During our stay in the library, a number of children wandered in, and were gently but successfully encouraged by the marvellous librarian to take books home, maximum two, and were instructed in how to tell when they were due. They were also most cordially invited to Story Hour tomorrow at 10, and on the way out, I gave our regrets - it would have been fun to go. Anyway, with the kind of encouragement we heard being handed out, I suspect there must be a strong core of readers in this community.   Community Congregational Church is a lovely stone building, charming outside and in, and on the national register of historic buildings. There are two transept balconies, and I was busy dreaming up programs of Gabrieli and company. Surrounded as we were by great, high mountains, the inscription on the organ case announced: Thy Righteousness is Like the High Mountains. The organ is our second by Charles Anderson of Denver, two-manual, 13-stops, built in approximately 1879. It seemed a bit transparent, after the two Weltes we had just been hearing. MaryAnn Crugher Balduf has been a regular at OHS conventions for some time. On the first day of the convention, she slipped getting off the bus (where is her lawyer when needed?), and was in some pain. But as always, gamely, she gave us the following interesting program: Pachelbel - Toccata in F Benjamin Rogers (1614-1698) - Prelude (Voluntary) William Selby (1738-1798) - A Fuge or Voluntary Wilbur Held (b. 1914) - Flourish Charles Wakefield Cadman (1881-1946) - Legend, Opus 30, No. 1 John Ebenezer West (1863-1939) - Passacaglia Howells - Miniatures for Organ, Nos. 12, 17, 18, 21 HYMN: O beautiful, for spacious skies (Materna) - we raised the roof! Langlais - Prelude Modal Emil Sjogren (1858-1918) - Fantasia, Opus 15, No. 1   Throughout the program, MaryAnn gave us information about what stops she was using, which I found helpful. At this and other OHS conventions, performers have reported acts of great kindness on the part of churches where they are playing, and have often acknowledged this at their recitals. MaryAnn told of someone from the Community Church finding out where she was staying, and getting the motel owner to let her into MaryAnn's room before she got there, so she could leave a basket of fruit. Others from the church helped her in other ways, as well. Nice things happen to people at OHS conventions! The churches are generally very honored to have a visit.   Next, we rode to Pueblo, and to the Pacific Union Depot, a disused train station, now a restaurant, where we had a quite wonderful dinner. This was as close to a convention banquet as we get, so it was a time for a little OHS business and some heartfelt thanks to the members of the Denver committee, who have truly done a wonderful job with program and with organization. There is still a bit more to come, but it has surely been a wonderful week. When we went in to dinner, the outside thermometer read 100 degrees, but by dinner's end, it had cooled down somewhat, so we did indeed walk to the Memorial Auditorium for the evening show, rather than using the busses as planned!! We had been warned, by the way, that the auditorium is not air conditioned!!   The auditorium contains Austin organ, No. 860, of 1920, an instrument of 56 full stops, plus various bells and whistles, all of which got a workout during the evening. There are pipes all over the place, on the side and in the ceiling, plus an echo organ in back. The hall is totally dead, and in the beginning, it was indeed hot, more so for those who felt they would hear the organ best in the balcony - I believe they roasted. Big doors were opened on both sides of the hall, and as the evening went on, we did cool down, and even experienced a breeze passing through. The audience was not entirely our convention. There were many others, possibly tourists, possibly town folk, or both. Paul Fleckenstein, I discovered tonight, is the perfect "town hall organist," possessed of great showmanship, total technical assurance, and a prodigious memory, and my goodness, he certainly knows how to get around that kind of instrument - finding an endless array of combinations. It was a terrific show, all from memory, beginning with the Choral, Minuet Gothique, Priere a Notre Dame, and Toccata from the Beollmann Suite Gothique. This was followed by the seven parts of the ballet music from Gounod's Faust, in a terrific transcription, uncredited, so probably Paul's own. Sharing in this concert was the Pueblo Chorale, a large and enthusiastic amateur choir, conducted by Charles Merritt. There were some lovely moments, but quite often, the inbuilt vocal limitations, particularly of the Tenor variety, gave cause for alarm. I thought the choice of music a bit odd, perhaps being something of a stretch for the non-musicians in the audience, not accustomed to a Latin Mass or the style of Louis Vierne. However, having thought that, I was probably wrong. The audience seemed genuinely interested, the choir was obviously very much into the music, which was really nice to see, and there was a great ovation at the end. Paul Fleckenstein's coloration and support at the organ were superb. After the Chorale left the stage, we all rose and sang, not half badly, the Star Spangled Banner, after which Paul played the Budley Duck variations really well. We hit the busses pretty quickly, and managed to get back to the Denver Doubletree just a bit after midnight! our departure tomorrow is later than usual - not until 9:15 - a great gift.   Good night all,   Malcolm Wechsler        
(back) Subject: Re: Webster's New World [was Psalm 150:4] From: "Peggy C. Bie" <peggyb@gate.net> Date: Fri, 26 Jun 1998 04:09:12 -0400   I was fascinated by the discussion of early organs. I even went to my bookshelf and pulled out "The Organ" by William Leslie Sumner. The first chapter is titled "The Organ of the Ancients." Apparently the first efforts to make a hydraulic organ occurred in the 4th centure BCE. The Greeks and Romans had them. I learned in a Florida State Univ. music history class 1952-3? that they were used in Gladiator Games and in War (made a tremendous loud noise). They had real pipes, keys, a wind supply, and used water pressure. By the 2nd & 3rd centures AD there were several types of pipes, both stopped and open, with feet and a mouth similar to the basic shape we all know. There are many pictures in this chapter. Organs were common in Europe and England by the early medieval period, 6th-8th centuries. A neat picture of a hydraulus is on p. 31, using several water barrels, four pumpers and two organists. They were used in churches by this time. Pneumatic organs were used in Mesopotamia before they developed in Greece - long before the 4th century b.c. The Magrephah was the legendary pneumatic organ of the Jews, no longer used after the destruction of the Temple in 70 A.D. The instrument mentioned in the Talmud iii.8 is said to have been so powerful it could be heard in Jericho 10 miles away. That sounds like the 27 stop Wurlitzer underground in a cemetery near San Diego?, CA that disturbed people 10 miles away.   Cheers, Peggy   http://www.geocities.com/CapitolHill/Senate/1095