PipeChat Digest #431 - Sunday, June 28, 1998
 
Re: Your opinions please  (Xpost)
  by <danbel@earthlink.net>
On-line Sheet Music Sources?
  by "John Balboni" <JohnB@GCQ.net>
Biblical Instruments
  by "Professor Alan Mortimer" <mortimer@ruralnet.net.au>
Re: Your opinions please
  by "Dr. Edward Peterson" <epeterso@madison.tdsnet.com>
Re: On-line Sheet Music Sources?
  by <Jason418@aol.com>
Re: Your opinions please
  by <danbel@earthlink.net>
Re: Your opinions please
  by "Dr. Edward Peterson" <epeterso@madison.tdsnet.com>
Re: Appropriate music.... whose opinion?
  by "Kurt Kehler" <kmkehler@compuserve.com>
Denver OHS - The End
  by <ManderUSA@aol.com>
Re: Your opinions please
  by "Stanley Lowkis" <nstarfil@MediaOne.net>
4 Pentecost, Proper 8: Westbury NY (x-post)
  by <mewzishn@spec.net>
 


(back) Subject: Re: Your opinions please (Xpost) From: danbel@earthlink.net Date: Sat, 27 Jun 1998 21:44:46 -0400   At 09:30 PM 6/27/98 EDT, you wrote: > Sorry if the last post raised some temperatures. But one might consider >looking up the definition of "scruple" before claiming that one is accused of >having a foot on which a certain undefined and unintended shoe fit. > Having a "scruple" is defined (Oxford Shorter Dictionary) as "tak[ing] >exception to or question[ing] the propriety of (an action or proposed action); >hesitate at (something)." Vol. II, p. 2737. Thus if one approaches the problem >with a clear conscience, one by definition will have no scruples! > As I said, its a free country. But quoting out of context rarely makes >for rational, intelligent, and productive discussion. >R. J. Siegel     And giving English and grammar lessons on an internet mailing list also rarely makes for rational, intelligent and productive discussion----at least about the topic at hand.   djb    
(back) Subject: On-line Sheet Music Sources? From: JohnB@GCQ.net (John Balboni) Date: Sat, 27 Jun 1998 23:44:21 -0400   Does anyone know of any on-line companies that are selling sheet music (suitable for organ use)? Perhaps someone that lets you do a secure transaction to buy the music and then download it as a PDF file? Looking for classical and T.O. tunes.   Thanks,   John Balboni johnb@gcq.net    
(back) Subject: Biblical Instruments From: Professor Alan Mortimer <mortimer@ruralnet.net.au> Date: Sun, 28 Jun 1998 14:52:42 GMT   A timbrel, as mentioned in the Psalms, is in fact a form of tambourine. The Salvation Army ladies use them quite brilliantly in their displays and accompaniment of praise songs.   Also, with regard to the biblical references submitted by Roger Pariseau, it all depends on what version of the Bible one reads. The definitive version we use in Bible Seminaries, Colleges etc. for study to the ministry is the RSV (Revised Standard Version) and it refers to PIPES...however, the Authorised or more correctly King James Version (KJV) of [circa] 1662 does indeed state ORGANS where the RSV uses PIPES.   Here endeth the mystery!   Regards Alan   Pfr. Alan Mortimer Australia    
(back) Subject: Re: Your opinions please From: epeterso@madison.tdsnet.com (Dr. Edward Peterson) Date: Sun, 28 Jun 1998 00:23:05 -0500   On Sat, 27 Jun 1998 13:51:15 -0400, danbel@earthlink.net wrote:   <SNIPPETY-SNIP of the all-too-logical analysis>   >These two situations are COMPLETELY different and SHOULD warrant different >approaches by the musician involved. I am certain that most readers of ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^   >this forum will be able to see the logic here -- I HOPE so! :):) >^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ >djb   BWWAA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA Boom! He just fell down...   Whatever you think, Dan!   Dr.Ed    
(back) Subject: Re: On-line Sheet Music Sources? From: <Jason418@aol.com> Date: Sun, 28 Jun 1998 01:33:38 EDT   A similar question was asked answered in the June 15 issue of U. S. News and World Report:   "The current selection of downloadable songs is limited because many copyright holders fear copying from the Internet will harm sales. One source is www.sheetmusicdirect.com with 500 exclusive titles, from Broadway to radio hits. Special software allows a one-time printout of the tunes. Another site, www.sunhawk.com, has 2,000-plus titles and more classical music. For users with compatible sound cards, it will play an electronic recording of the piece."   Hope this helps.   Wayne King  
(back) Subject: Re: Your opinions please From: danbel@earthlink.net Date: Sun, 28 Jun 1998 01:44:42 -0400   Dr. Edward Peterson wrote: > > On Sat, 27 Jun 1998 13:51:15 -0400, danbel@earthlink.net wrote: > > <SNIPPETY-SNIP of the all-too-logical analysis> > > >These two situations are COMPLETELY different and SHOULD warrant different > >approaches by the musician involved. I am certain that most readers of > ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ > > >this forum will be able to see the logic here -- I HOPE so! :):) > >^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ > >djb > > BWWAA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA > HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA > HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA Boom! He just fell down... > > Whatever you think, Dan! > > Dr.Ed >   Well -- here is obviously one of the ones who can NOT see the logic.   djb  
(back) Subject: Re: Your opinions please From: epeterso@madison.tdsnet.com (Dr. Edward Peterson) Date: Sun, 28 Jun 1998 01:00:37 -0500   On Sun, 28 Jun 1998 01:44:42 -0400, danbel@earthlink.net wrote:   > >Well -- here is obviously one of the ones who can NOT see the logic. > >djb   Au contraire, Dan. Au contraire.   Let us not be overly defensive. I agree with your position 100%.   E/ (who, apparently, must abandon subtlety for the sledge-hammer)    
(back) Subject: Re: Appropriate music.... whose opinion? From: "Kurt Kehler" <kmkehler@compuserve.com> Date: Sun, 28 Jun 1998 02:22:59 -0400   Shirley,   I don't have AOL. Could these paragraphs be cut and pasted? If not, would you mind summarizing them?   Kurt     On Sat, 27 Jun 1998 19:40:00 -0400, Shirley wrote:   >Heh. > >Karl, and everybody, if you have AOL, check out Weddings@aol. There's an >icon for it at the bottom of the mail reader. In that, there are a few >paragraphs about choosing the wedding music. > >Quite amusing. > > --Shirley >            
(back) Subject: Denver OHS - The End From: <ManderUSA@aol.com> Date: Sun, 28 Jun 1998 03:26:40 EDT   Dear Ones,   I am safely ensconced in the back of the bus (Welte-Tripp), and we are heading up into the high mountains for a tour of Rocky Mountain National Park, having just heard the last two recitals of the convention, both played by David Macfarlane, of New York. The first was a somewhat bitter-sweet occasion, as the fine old building (the former Asbury Methodist Church) has been bought by a developer. Mike Rowe, convention chairman, says a great effort is being made to find a new home for this one of not-too-many remaining organs by Denver builder, Charles Anderson. This may not be an easy task, as the instrument is not small, and is divided in two cases on either side of a window. It's not fabulous, but is solid and good, if not overly colorful - it would be a lot better for some church than you-know-what! It might also be one of those cases in which the owner would be just happy to find someone to take it out, without asking for money. David's program: HYMN: Father, we priase thee (Christe Sanctorum) Saint-Saens - Prelude & Fugue in G, Opus 109, No. 3 (1898) Sweelinck - Variations: Balletto del Granduca Vierne - Communion (Messe Basse) Opus 30 James Woodman (b. 1957) - Noel Anglais Mendelssohn - Allegretto and Finale from Sonata 4   This program served to demonstrate all the possibilities of the instrument, built by Anderson in 1882, with two manuals and 16-stops. We next drove a short way to what is now a Roman Catholic home for the elderly, called The Gardens at St. Elizabeth's, with the lovely Chapel of Christ the King, built in 1903. The style is Christopher Wren, and the windows are by Clayton & Bell of London. The organ is one of the oldest extant Austins, Opus 92 from 1902/3. David's program was cleverly entitled and organized as "A Little Organ Mass," and was as follows: INTROIT: Frescobaldi - Toccata IX (2nd Book of Toccatas) KYRIE: de Grigny - Fugue a 5 GLORIA: Bach - Allein Gott (BWV 663) OFFERTOIRE: Reger - Ave Maria (Opus 80, No. 5) ELEVATION: Gaspard Corrette (? - 1733) - Dialogue des Flutes (Missa Octavi Toni) COMMUNION: Milhaud - Pastorale SORTIE: Langlais - Point d'Orgue HYMN: From all who dwell below the skies (Duke Street)   I think to do a program like this wants an organ of color, articulation, and variety, and also, perhaps, in a room which will give it space to expand. On a rather pallid instrument of 10 stops, with the highest pitch being four foot flutes on both divisions, I don't think a program of such scope really works, being more "eye candy" than "ear candy." However, there were things to like, and many thanks to David for doing two recitals on two different organs back to back. As an extra bonus, someone rang for us the really beautiful peal of bells - I think I heard nine (Taylors?).   And now, as we continue our steady ascent into the mountains, I would like to report on Tom Murray's splendid lecture yesterday. We heard 27 wonderful recorded examples, all from 78s of the 1920s or 1930s, and with each example, we saw on the screen (a really nice touch) a slide of the actual record label - sometimes two labels, one for the original European or English release, and one for U. S. release. When possible, other slides were shown, perhaps the artist, or the building or organ. The organ was a "phonographic black sheep," because of its range, and powerful bass, but became less so with the advent of electric microphones in the mid-20s. The problem was getting such low frequencies on the grooves. Another problem for all music was the shortness of time available before a record had to be turned over - 4 1/2 to 5 minutes on a 12 inch record, less on a 10 inch one. Here is what we heard:   The first two examples compared an accoustically recorded work (mid-1916) with one recorded on an electric microphone. AMERICAN RECORDINGS 1) Chopin Funeral March, played by Richard Keys Biggs on an unknown Estey - mid-1916. 2) Liszt Liebestraum, played by Henry Gordon Thunder on the Estey organ in the Victor Studios in Camden, NJ. - 1927 3) Handel Largo - Mark Andrews on the above organ. The Victor Recording Studio Estey had a pedal division designed to fit easily in the grooves of a 78, with two stops, a Trombone and a Bass Viol, with less fundamental, thus best for recording. 4) Mendelssohn War March of the Priests, played by Edward Kimball on the then Austin organ in the Tabernacle at Salt Lake. Recorded 1927.This represented a bit of daring, moving out of the carefully controlled studio in to remote locations. The sound on this is a bit scratchy, but the depth of tone is there, or is beginning to be there. 5) Liszt Ad Nos - Germani at the NY Wanamaker Store, 1929. Germani was 25. That there was now less fear of the bass tones is clear from his use of low C on the 32. 6) I love to hear you singing - played by Jesse Crawford, WurliTzer organ, Paramount studio. Recorded 1929, under the excellent conditions in the studio. This recording was a best-seller. Jesse Crawford really defined the playing of the Theatre Organ for the future. ENGLISH RECORDINGS 7) Bach Prelude in D Major, played by Walter Alcock on the Willis in Salisbury. Recorded in early 1927. The English, rather than recording in studio at the beginning, tended to go on the road right from the beginning. With no editing available, most of these recordings have some mistakes. Alcock is quoted as saying that when playing his recordings for people, he learned to cough loudly when he knew mistakes were coming up. 8) Cocker Tuba Tune, played by Stanley Marchant at St. Paul's Cathedral, London, recorded mid-1929. 9) Dupre Prelude in G minor, Marcel Dupre on the Hill organ of Queen's Hall, London, recorded 1926. This was Dupre at 40, observing his own quite rapid tempo marking. 10) Bach Prelude in E minor (The Cathedral), Albert Schweitzer - Queens Hall, recorded mid-1928. The hall was blitzed in the war, taking with it many orchestral instruments of London players, stored in the building, perhaps for safety! 11) Bach Toccata in F, Anton van der Horst, Hill organ, Central Hall, Westminster. Recorded 1929 12) Dvorak Humoresque. G. T. Pattman on the John Compton organ in the Liberal Jewish Synagogue, London.Recorded 1926. 13) Bach Gigue Fugue, Edward d'Evry, Walker Organ in Brompton Oratory, issued early 1927. The registrations are very French. The Pedal part is full of mistakes, to the point that it is humorous for the listener. 14) Mendelssohn Hear my prayer, with Thalben-Ball at the Temple Church organ, with treble Ernest Lough, which sold over a million copies. 15) Wagner/Lemare, The Ride of the Valkyries, with George Thalben-Ball at the Alexandra Palace Father Willis Organ. Recorded 1931. FRANCE 16) Tournemire, on the organ of St. Sulpice, plays Fantasie III, recorded in 1930. In quiet places, it is possible to hear the Barker machine. 17) Widor Toccata, played by himself at age 87, at a tempo some will find sedate, at St. Sulpice. 18) Edward Commette, Scherzo, played by himself where he always recorded, in his Church of St. Jean, Lyons. He always recorded for Columbia, as their surfaces were less noisy. This recording was issued in 1929. 19) Bach Fantasia in G minor, played by Vierne at Notre Dame, recorded 1929. The organ was incredibly out of tune. A U. S. tour at this time was to raise money for the organ. 20) Gretchaninoff Credo, with Chaliapine and choir, and the Cavaille-Coll organ in the Salle Pleyel, Paris. Recorded 1932.This use of the organ is unusual in orthodox churches. GERMANY 21) Bach Trio Sonata 4 (excerpts) - Gunther Ramin on the Sauer organ in St. Thomas Leipzig, recorded pre-1936. 22) For comparison, the same Trio as above, but played on the Piano by the famous duo, Vronsky and Babin - recorded in 1930. 23) Reger, Organphantasie "Ein feste Burg" - Alfred Sittart at the Walcker organ of St. Michael's, Hamburg - one of the largest church organs in Germany, destroyed in the war. Recorded by Polydor in 1933. They insisted that everything be in three languages, and mistaking Burg for Berg, and being confused about "feste," the English translation of the chorale name is "A Mountain Fastness!" 24) Liszt Ad nos . . ., Alfred Sittart as above, but recorded in 1928. There are many additions to what is in the score in this performance. It is said that Liszt never played his pieces the same twice, always adding to them. 25) Bach Toccata in D minor, information as above. ORGAN PLUS: 26) Anglican Chant Psalms 15 and 84, Choir of St. George's Chapel, Windsor Castle. Malcolm Boyle, organist, Sir Walford Davies conducting. 27) Bach - St. Matthew Passion, sung by the choir of St. Bartholomew's, NY, David McK Williams, organist and conductor - recorded in 1932, with a huge, dramatic organ acompaniment. The last thing we heard was a wonderful song by McGill and Barker, called "The Organ Blower." It was really funny.   It's late, and I must sleep. Tomorrow, I would like to describe our afternoon in Rocky Mountain National Park, a wonderful experience, and make some general observations about this wonderful convention, now over.   Best to all,   Malcolm Wechsler  
(back) Subject: Re: Your opinions please From: Stanley Lowkis <nstarfil@MediaOne.net> Date: Sun, 28 Jun 1998 03:28:22 -0400   Dr. Edward Peterson wrote: > > On Sun, 28 Jun 1998 01:44:42 -0400, danbel@earthlink.net wrote: > > > > > >Well -- here is obviously one of the ones who can NOT see the logic. > > > >djb > > Au contraire, Dan. Au contraire. > > Let us not be overly defensive. I agree with your position 100%. > > E/ (who, apparently, must abandon subtlety for the sledge-hammer) >   ....And I suppose that our plans for having Dan play the Wagner Recessional on the Flentrop at James' wedding are also "kaput"?   Oh, the humanity! Stan  
(back) Subject: 4 Pentecost, Proper 8: Westbury NY (x-post) From: mewzishn@spec.net Date: Sun, 28 Jun 1998 03:53:11 +0000   28 June 1998, 11.00 am, Rite II Church of the Advent, Westbury NY The Rev'd Jeffrey Hoyt Krantz, rector Kenneth L. Sybesma, choirmaster and organist     This being the fourth Sunday of the month, after the retiring procession   there is the laying on of hands and anointing for whose who wish to remain and partake of the sacrament.     Voluntary, “Introduction, Adagio (Sonate II)” Felix Mendelssohn Hymn at the Entering Procession, Toulon "God of the prophets, bless the prophets' heirs!" Gloria in excelsis Deo, Intercession Mass (David Hurd) Hymn at the Gospel Procession, Laramie "I know not where the road will lead" Voluntary at the Presentation, “Flute Tune” Thomas Arne Hymn at the Preparation, Love Unknown "My song is love unknown" Sanctus et Benedictus (Robert Powell) Lord’s Prayer, Plainsong Confractoria, Plainsong (Be known to us...; ad. Mason Martens) Voluntary at the Holy Communion, “O Welt, ich muss dich lassen (11 Chorale Preludes)” Johannes Brahms Hymn at the Ablutions, Monk's Gate "He who would valiant be" Hymn at the Retiring Procession, Westminster Abbey "Christ is made the sure foundation" Voluntaries after the Dismissal and During the Anointing, Chorale Preludes by Johann Sebastian Bach, Johannes Brahms and Sigfrid Karg-Elert