PipeChat Digest #432 - Monday, June 29, 1998
 
Re: Your opinions please
  by <danbel@earthlink.net>
ADMIN POSTING - ALL READ!!
  by "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com>
Denver (was Re: ADMIN POSTING - ALL READ!!)
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com>
Re: Your opinions please  -- the velvet sledgehammer
  by "Dr. Edward Peterson" <epeterso@madison.tdsnet.com>
Re: Your opinions please  -- the velvet sledgehammer
  by <danbel@earthlink.net>
Re: Your opinions please  -- LAST TIME
  by <danbel@earthlink.net>
Re: Psalm 150:4
  by "Jason D. Comet" <bombarde8@juno.com>
Re: Is anybody out there?
  by "Jason D. Comet" <bombarde8@juno.com>
Re: Webster's New World [was Psalm 150:4]
  by "Jason D. Comet" <bombarde8@juno.com>
Re: Books
  by "Jason D. Comet" <bombarde8@juno.com>
Re: Webster's New World [was Psalm 150:4]
  by "Jason D. Comet" <bombarde8@juno.com>
Re: Books
  by "Jason D. Comet" <bombarde8@juno.com>
Re: Calvary Chamades
  by "Jason D. Comet" <bombarde8@juno.com>
Re: Refusable toe-tappers???
  by "Jason D. Comet" <bombarde8@juno.com>
Re: Traditional Church Music
  by "Jason D. Comet" <bombarde8@juno.com>
Re: HELLLLLO!!
  by "Jason D. Comet" <bombarde8@juno.com>
Re: Traditional Church Music
  by "Jason D. Comet" <bombarde8@juno.com>
Musical Instruments in the Bible
  by "Jason D. Comet" <bombarde8@juno.com>
Re: Psalm 150:4
  by "Kevin Cartwright" <kevin1@alaweb.com>
Re: Musical Instruments in the Bible
  by "Brent Johnson" <bmjohns@swbell.net>
Re: Musical Instruments in the Bible- Sackbut
  by "Stanley Lowkis" <nstarfil@MediaOne.net>
Organ & Piano, Ensemble Pieces Wanted
  by "S. Kishimoto" <KN655200@copernicus.or.jp>
Re: Refusable toe-tappers???
  by <Steskinner@aol.com>
Crystal Cathedral
  by "Charles Brown" <clmoney@cybernex.net>
Re: Musical Instruments in the Bible- Sackbut
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com>
 


(back) Subject: Re: Your opinions please From: danbel@earthlink.net Date: Sun, 28 Jun 1998 09:27:15 -0400   At 03:28 AM 6/28/98 -0400, you wrote: >...And I suppose that our plans for having Dan play the Wagner >Recessional on the Flentrop at James' wedding are also "kaput"? > >Oh, the humanity! >Stan >   Shucks---and I was SO looking forward to that! :)   djb    
(back) Subject: ADMIN POSTING - ALL READ!! From: David Scribner <david@blackiris.com> Date: Sun, 28 Jun 1998 08:24:55 -0500   Folks   We are getting way off topic with this "Opinions Please" thread. Please drop it IMMEDIATELY. It is falling outside of the List Guidelines and is getting very heated in the process.   From beautiful Denver where one convention is over and the other just ready to begin.   David   *************** David Scribner Co-Owner / Technical Administrator PipeChat      
(back) Subject: Denver (was Re: ADMIN POSTING - ALL READ!!) From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com> Date: Sun, 28 Jun 1998 08:39:29 -0500 (CDT)   At 08:24 AM 6/28/98 -0500, David Scribner wrote:   >>From beautiful Denver where one convention is over and the other just ready >to begin.   I have just got back from Denver myself. It was great to be with David and several other Pipechat members at the OHS convention. After a week in the pure mountain air of the Rockies, however, I have been stricken with dreadful allergies on returning to the air pollution and humidity of St. Louis. For me the highlight of the OHS convention was Tom Murray's recital on the 1938 Kimball at St. John's Cathedral in Denver on Tuesday. Next year's convention is in Montreal, so I hope I shall see some of you there too.   Kind regards,   John.    
(back) Subject: Re: Your opinions please -- the velvet sledgehammer From: epeterso@madison.tdsnet.com (Dr. Edward Peterson) Date: Sun, 28 Jun 1998 10:49:03 -0500   On Sun, 28 Jun 1998 09:27:15 -0400, danbel@earthlink.net wrote:   >At 03:28 AM 6/28/98 -0400, you wrote: >>...And I suppose that our plans for having Dan play the Wagner >>Recessional on the Flentrop at James' wedding are also "kaput"? >> >>Oh, the humanity! >>Stan >> > >Shucks---and I was SO looking forward to that! :) > >djb   Cheer up Dan. All is not lost.... At least that is tentatively settled.   Unfortunately, I have been in contact with a number of the other "hired help" and the reports are NOT good. Not good at all.   1) The caterer does not like the current choice of food suggested by the bride's mother and is supplying a brand new menu of his own choosing.   2A) The bridal gown maker thinks the bride hasn't the taste of a warthog and is preparing a dress of her own choosing.   2B) The Bridal Consultant thinks the colour scheme is the pits and will be redoing everything in shades of mauve and silver.   2C) In light of these other changes, the hair-stylist really MUST (that's what he said, honey, he *MUST*) change the whole focus (and colour) of the bride's hair. He was last seen muttering: "What's the matter with these ditzy hets anyway - can you IMAGINE??"   2D) The florist thinks the choice of flowers is totally inappropriate and will be substituting the flowers and greenery of his own choosing, but there may be some minor delay flying in the mauve orchids at the last minute. [He was heard saying the florist's version of the hair-stylist's lament...]   3) The tuxedo renter does not like James' choice of attire for the men and is changing all the colours - as well as the sizes for the all the rented formal attire.   4) The bakery insists that they will not do the cake the bride wants and will be providing a five-tier Cinderella extravaganza of its choosing.   5) The travel agent insists that the B & G haven't a clew where they should be going and has, therefore, exchanged the tickets for the planned weekend in the Great Smokie Mountains for a 3-week luxury cruise of the Mediterranean.   6) The videographer hasn't returned the call yet ...   What else? What else? There must be more... well, now that the music is (almost) settled, we can deal with the rest of these warthogs' lack of taste in due course.   E/ (putting down the sledge - but keeping it handy)  
(back) Subject: Re: Your opinions please -- the velvet sledgehammer From: danbel@earthlink.net Date: Sun, 28 Jun 1998 14:07:39 -0400   At 10:49 AM 6/28/98 -0500, you wrote: >What else? What else? There must be more... well, now that the music is >(almost) settled, we can deal with the rest of these warthogs' lack of >taste in due course. > >E/ (putting down the sledge - but keeping it handy)   Conception of "lack of taste" or "good taste" is relative.   djb    
(back) Subject: Re: Your opinions please -- LAST TIME From: danbel@earthlink.net Date: Sun, 28 Jun 1998 14:10:06 -0400   Whoops -- being momentarily bombarded with BS I almost forgot the admonishment from the List Owner that this thread be curtailed. Sorry about that David!   djb    
(back) Subject: Re: Psalm 150:4 From: bombarde8@juno.com (Jason D. Comet) Date: Sun, 28 Jun 1998 17:12:06 -0400   Of course, of all instruments mentioned in 150, the organ >can do all of it except dance:     Noregian Dances 1, 2, 3 (or more)???? Jason Comet bombarde8@juno.com |\ | \ O   _____________________________________________________________________ You don't need to buy Internet access to use free Internet e-mail. Get completely free e-mail from Juno at http://www.juno.com Or call Juno at (800) 654-JUNO [654-5866]  
(back) Subject: Re: Is anybody out there? From: bombarde8@juno.com (Jason D. Comet) Date: Sat, 27 Jun 1998 19:17:58 -0400     >I'm here .. so guess I'm nobody! :) hehe Me Too! (I guess)   My relatives live in Denver, but we don't have the money to see them.   Lat. Jason Comet bombarde8@juno.com |\ | \ O   _____________________________________________________________________ You don't need to buy Internet access to use free Internet e-mail. Get completely free e-mail from Juno at http://www.juno.com Or call Juno at (800) 654-JUNO [654-5866]  
(back) Subject: Re: Webster's New World [was Psalm 150:4] From: bombarde8@juno.com (Jason D. Comet) Date: Sun, 28 Jun 1998 17:22:49 -0400   >For extra credit: who knows what a "hydraulis" is?   The first Organ to have a series of keys and pipes that regulated the air by water? The sound was not all that good because I have heard one played over in Switzerland. There is an organ museum there and thay have a hydraulis there.     Jason Comet bombarde8@juno.com |\ | \ O   _____________________________________________________________________ You don't need to buy Internet access to use free Internet e-mail. Get completely free e-mail from Juno at http://www.juno.com Or call Juno at (800) 654-JUNO [654-5866]  
(back) Subject: Re: Books From: bombarde8@juno.com (Jason D. Comet) Date: Sun, 28 Jun 1998 17:15:18 -0400   >Which Catholic hymnal did you find?     I have NO Idea. It is down at my church (7 blocks away and it use to be the other side of my driveway until I moved ito this H O R R I B L E place)   If I think about it, I'll look it up.   I do know that it was a Catholic Hymnal Press or something along that line.   Lat. Jason Comet bombarde8@juno.com |\ | \ O   _____________________________________________________________________ You don't need to buy Internet access to use free Internet e-mail. Get completely free e-mail from Juno at http://www.juno.com Or call Juno at (800) 654-JUNO [654-5866]  
(back) Subject: Re: Webster's New World [was Psalm 150:4] From: bombarde8@juno.com (Jason D. Comet) Date: Sun, 28 Jun 1998 17:19:59 -0400   "The Organ" by William Leslie Sumner.   I have read this book from cover to cover (including the copyrights and stuff)   I rent it from the library when ever I feel like it. The librarian told me (after she looked it up) that I, and several organ friend (who are all professional Master's degrees organists) was the ONLY people to sign it out the entire time it was here!   I guess it goes to show you that the organ isn't all that popular in the NY area!   LATER! Jason Comet bombarde8@juno.com |\ | \ O   _____________________________________________________________________ You don't need to buy Internet access to use free Internet e-mail. Get completely free e-mail from Juno at http://www.juno.com Or call Juno at (800) 654-JUNO [654-5866]  
(back) Subject: Re: Books From: bombarde8@juno.com (Jason D. Comet) Date: Sun, 28 Jun 1998 17:36:49 -0400   On Fri, 26 Jun 1998 12:09:44 -0500 jfjc@juno.com (John F. Crowley) writes: >And-our hymnal that we use at the Catholic Church where I play has >hymns in it that were taken from the Lutheran Hymnal.   The Catholic Hymnal has many hymns from denomination other than Catholic. I have heard that the Catholics have changed to combine other denominations into a different form of Catholic. The only Catholic music that is still original is the chants that were started at the beginning of Catholicism.   Now DON"T hollar at me. I was only telling you what I heard on the television.   Jason Comet bombarde8@juno.com |\ | \ O   _____________________________________________________________________ You don't need to buy Internet access to use free Internet e-mail. Get completely free e-mail from Juno at http://www.juno.com Or call Juno at (800) 654-JUNO [654-5866]  
(back) Subject: Re: Calvary Chamades From: bombarde8@juno.com (Jason D. Comet) Date: Sun, 28 Jun 1998 17:10:50 -0400   >I find some versions of the Bible state "organ" in that verse, and >others don't. The more contemporary versions (we used to own a >Christian bookstore) have more modern items listed in a strange font >as >if they were added, like the word "organ." But, if I pull out my Old >King James version, there is no mention of the organ. > >Keep talking about "anything else," and you might get into trouble. >It >doesn't say specifically "modern piano" either. And, if all a church >can afford is a Hammond B-3, let them go for it...     I say that we all (church goer and bible readers) should learn Hebrew and read the original manuscripts [If they still exist :-) ]   Jason Comet bombarde8@juno.com |\ | \ O   _____________________________________________________________________ You don't need to buy Internet access to use free Internet e-mail. Get completely free e-mail from Juno at http://www.juno.com Or call Juno at (800) 654-JUNO [654-5866]  
(back) Subject: Re: Refusable toe-tappers??? From: bombarde8@juno.com (Jason D. Comet) Date: Sat, 27 Jun 1998 20:22:10 -0400   tape. >It's a >pain in the butt to transcribe a tape and it's not a good idea in the >first place. Those tapes are fine for listening in the car, but ><bold>disastrous </bold>if you try and have a congregation sing along >with it. Those long, beautiful solo breaks, bridges, etc...just >confuse >everyone. It'll turn into a performance with the congregation to >confused to do anything but sit there and listen.     That is not a good way to "dismiss" that kind of music in worship. Every body will think that you play REALLY well and would want you to play like that more often. (Trust me, I've done that!) 8-/     Jason Comet bombarde8@juno.com |\ | \ O   _____________________________________________________________________ You don't need to buy Internet access to use free Internet e-mail. Get completely free e-mail from Juno at http://www.juno.com Or call Juno at (800) 654-JUNO [654-5866]  
(back) Subject: Re: Traditional Church Music From: bombarde8@juno.com (Jason D. Comet) Date: Sun, 28 Jun 1998 17:38:42 -0400   >I am going to say, a piece as such probably would be more apprpopriate >before the wedding ceremony begins, while the church is still noisy. I >have been the organist at Sts. mary and Joseph for over eight years >and so far, there have been no objections to what some might call >"radio music" before the ceremony. But NEVER during it. The majority >of our weddings are scheduled for 2:00 pm and when 2:00pm ccomes >around and I start to play the enterance music for the parents/bridal >party, etc, tyhen the service has officially begun. I do not permit >someone to play a "part" of a service, my feelings on this are >simple--the parish hired me to provide music for such services and it >supplements my income. > >There have been many weddings where Sunrise, Sunset has been played >before hand, that to me, the thing is totally played out. I suggested >to a couple Andrew Lloyd Webbers "All I Ask Of You" from "The Phantom >of The Opera". That plus a little Bach, or such if they so desire. >"More" the theme from Mondo Cane has also been played.     Thsi is what my church has ended up doing, but It doesn't feel right to many people of the congregation. Jason Comet bombarde8@juno.com |\ | \ O   _____________________________________________________________________ You don't need to buy Internet access to use free Internet e-mail. Get completely free e-mail from Juno at http://www.juno.com Or call Juno at (800) 654-JUNO [654-5866]  
(back) Subject: Re: HELLLLLO!! From: bombarde8@juno.com (Jason D. Comet) Date: Sun, 28 Jun 1998 17:08:48 -0400     On Thu, 25 Jun 1998 22:28:50 -0400 Ruth <theraven@istar.ca> writes: >Hi Jason. > >I have never heard of contemporary church music. Actually, what I >mean is >that I have heard of it, but I have never heard any of the music. I >went >to the funeral of a neighbour, >he was only 23, and they had a Young People Group of about 6 sing and >play >"Here I am Lord." Well, I have never heard the tune, I dont know if >its >contemporary or not, but it sent shivers down my spine. It sounded >lovely. > >I am happy that we do not have contemporary music in my church > > >Ruth     That is what I am COMPLETELY against during a church service.   That song use to be our closing responce. The first meeting I went to as a worship committee member I had that changed. Along with the Gloria Patri (which the main"pianist" (a self taught pianist playing the organ) is still playing like a funeral march.) Now I am working on the doxology. The Old 100th to Last Un Erfreuen (?spelling)     Jason Comet bombarde8@juno.com |\ | \ O   _____________________________________________________________________ You don't need to buy Internet access to use free Internet e-mail. Get completely free e-mail from Juno at http://www.juno.com Or call Juno at (800) 654-JUNO [654-5866]  
(back) Subject: Re: Traditional Church Music From: bombarde8@juno.com (Jason D. Comet) Date: Sun, 28 Jun 1998 17:32:57 -0400     >There are QUALITY authors and composers writing QUALITY texts and >music >for the present and future generations. > >I have been a part time church musician for 40+ years, 30 years >serving >the same congregation. I have always tried to work with, not against, > >the pastor(s)....I've been through many....Using skills in >communication >which I have developed over the years, I have had few confrontations >regarding choice of music. > >Sure, I may not appreciate some of the music which is requested, but I >am >not going to throw a "hissy-fit" or childlike tantrum if I don't get >my >way. By acting in a manner such as that you are just showing your >immaturity as a young apprentice church musician. > >I do not play guitar well. I am not planning on improving my skills. >If >the new pastor of our congregation wishes that kind of music I will >gladly relinquish my role as director of music and be happy to use the > >organ (which is a SKinner) for preludes/postludes/ etc. > >If the pastor wishes me for me to play piano for hymns, I believe I am > >capable of doing that, and will do so to the best of my ability. > >I will not pull the childlike behaviour pattern of stomping my feet, >pouting and refusing to play certain compositions because the quality >of >the music is below me. Communication with the pastor should be a goal >we >all should strive for. > >Please do not consider this message to be a slap on the wrist. It is >just a few ideas I have gained from 40+ years of working in churches >as a >part time musician.     Our pastor will N O T have the hymns or songs of worship played on anything but the organ. But, she picks hymns that have N O place in the theme of the service or for the service for that matter. She (yes it's a female pastor) hasdemolished the vow every full time employed musician and directors of music have passed on for approximatly 80 years.   "I promise to uphold the tradition of traditional music at -------- . Under no cirrcumstances shall there be modern music in the church during the Sunday morning hour of worship. If the modern style of music is to take place, it shall be done at a place and time that is different than the Sunday hour of Worship." etc... etc... etc...   (Not quoted exactly) (the ----- is the name of several differnt names of the same building)   Jason Comet bombarde8@juno.com |\ | \ O   _____________________________________________________________________ You don't need to buy Internet access to use free Internet e-mail. Get completely free e-mail from Juno at http://www.juno.com Or call Juno at (800) 654-JUNO [654-5866]  
(back) Subject: Musical Instruments in the Bible From: bombarde8@juno.com (Jason D. Comet) Date: Sat, 27 Jun 1998 20:15:34 -0400   I Got These from my bible program. Thought that you all would be interested. Since we've got nothing better to do!     Smith's Dict. # 3080 Musical instruments of the Hebrews. (There has been great obscurity as to the instruments of music in use among the Hebrews, but the discoveries on the monuments of Egypt and Assyria have thrown much light upon the form and nature of these instruments. I. STRINGED INSTRUMENTS.-- 1. The harp or lyre. [See illustration] 2. The psaltery, the name of various large instruments of the harp kind. 3. The sackbut, a harp-like instrument of four strings and of triangular form. 4. A kind of lute or guitar (mahalath), in titles to # Psal 53:1 and Psal 88:1 with a long, flat neck, and a hollow body of wood whose surface was perforated with holes. There were three strings, end the whole instrument was three or four feet long. 5. The gittith, in titles to # Psal 8:1, 81:1, 84:1 a stringed instrument, probably found by David st Gath, whence its name. II. INSTRUMENTS OF PERCUSSION. 1. The timbrel, a form of tambourine, a narrow hoop covered with a tightened skin, and struck with the hand on the Egyptian monuments are three kinds --the circular, the square, and another formed by two squares separated by a bar. 2. The drum (toph). Of this there were many varieties, some of them resembling modern drums. The Egyptians had along drum, of wood or copper, 2 1/2 feet long, resembling the tom-tom of India, and beaten by the hand. Another form was shaped like a cask with bulging centre, and was made of copper. It was of the same length as the other, but larger around, and was beaten with sticks. Another drum was more like our kettledrum; and one of these, the rabbins say, was placed in the temple court to the priests to prayer, and could be heard from Jerusalem to Jericho. 3. Bells (paanton), attached to the high priest's dress, and rung by striking against the knobs, shaped like pomegranates, which were hung near them. 4. Cymbals. The earliest cymbals were probably finger cymbals -small plates of metal fastened to the thumb and middle finger, and struck together. Afterward there were the large cymbals, played with both hands. 5. Systra (menaanim), # 2Sam 6:5 there translated comets. The systrum was a carved bronze or copper frame, with a handle, in all from 8 to 18 inches long, with movable rings and bars. It was shaken with the hand, and the rings and bars made a piercing metallic sound by striking against the bronze frame. 6. The triangle (shalishim), # 1Sam 18:6 a musical instrument (machol) used for accompanying the dance, and several times translated dancing. # Psal 150:3,45 It was a metallic rim or frame sometimes with a handle and had small bells attached to it, or bars across on which were strung metallic rings or plates. It was held in the hand, and was played by the women at weddings and merry-makings. III. WIND INSTRUMENTS. -- 1. The syrinx, pandean pipe or bagpipe (ugab); translated "organ" in # Gene 4:21 Either like the bagpipe, or a series of pipes from 5 to 23 in number, though usually only 7. 2. The horn,in the form of an animal's horn even when made of metal but originating in the use of the horns of cattle. 3. The trumpet (shophar) same as horn, 2. 4. The straight trumpet. 5. The flute (halil, meaning "bored through "), a pipe perforated with holes, originally made from reeds, but afterward of wood bone, horn or ivory. It was chiefly consecrated to joy or pleasure. 6. The flute, alluded to in # Dani 3:6 probably a kind of double flageolet. 7. The dulcimer, # Dani 3:5 a kind of bagpipe with two shrill reeds. The modern dulcimer is a triangular instrument strung with about 60 brass wires, and played upon with little sticks or metallic rods. It more resembles the ancient psaltery than the dulcimer of # Dani 3:5 --ED.)     _____________________________________________________________________ You don't need to buy Internet access to use free Internet e-mail. Get completely free e-mail from Juno at http://www.juno.com Or call Juno at (800) 654-JUNO [654-5866]  
(back) Subject: Re: Psalm 150:4 From: Kevin Cartwright <kevin1@alaweb.com> Date: Sun, 28 Jun 1998 20:50:15 -0500   Jason D. Comet wrote: > Noregian Dances 1, 2, 3 (or more)????   Of course, I went on to say that an organ could not LITERALLY dance as an action (you know, a pie can't 'smell' either...) I then said "figurative dancing" followed by a dot, dot, dot (...)   Anyway,   Kevin C. kevin1@alaweb.com    
(back) Subject: Re: Musical Instruments in the Bible From: Brent Johnson <bmjohns@swbell.net> Date: Sun, 28 Jun 1998 22:03:56 -0500   Jason D. Comet wrote:   > I Got These from my bible program. Thought that you all would be > interested. Since we've got nothing better to do!   > I. STRINGED INSTRUMENTS.--   > 3. The sackbut, a harp-like instrument of four strings and of triangular > form.   I'm not a music historian, and I must be honest, I didn't read the whole post, but I was taught a sakbut was a medieval brass instrument, like a trombone. The name literally means push-pull. Groves verifies this as an early English name for the trombone. Brent Johnson http://home.swbell.net/bmjohns      
(back) Subject: Re: Musical Instruments in the Bible- Sackbut From: Stanley Lowkis <nstarfil@MediaOne.net> Date: Sun, 28 Jun 1998 23:31:02 -0400   Brent Johnson wrote: > > Jason D. Comet wrote: > > > I Got These from my bible program. Thought that you all would be > > interested. Since we've got nothing better to do! > > > I. STRINGED INSTRUMENTS.-- > > > 3. The sackbut, a harp-like instrument of four strings and of triangular > > form. > > I'm not a music historian, and I must be honest, I didn't read the whole > post, but I was taught a sakbut was a medieval brass instrument, like a > trombone. The name literally means push-pull. Groves verifies this as an > early English name for the trombone. > Brent Johnson > http://home.swbell.net/bmjohns   ....It is BOTH. 1. a medieval wind instrument, forerunner of the trombone. AND 2. Bible- a stringed instrument resembling a lyre. Websters New World Dictionary.   It is NOT a manifestation of an obese condition.   Stan  
(back) Subject: Organ & Piano, Ensemble Pieces Wanted From: "S. Kishimoto" <KN655200@copernicus.or.jp> Date: Mon, 29 Jun 1998 16:41:56 +0900   Hi! Chatters!   Until now, I have been ROM of this mailing list, and this is my first post of mailing list.   I play one manual pipe organ of Japan Evangelical Lutheran Ohokayama Church in Tokyo, Japan. Every year, our church holds the musical service on the last Sunday of October. And normally our church invites the musician(s) from other church or organization. But, this year we intend to hold the musical service by ourselves, with the member of our church only. Because we have talented young generation and we can expect their musical performance. We have one violinist, one flutist, one bass recorder player, a few pianist and a few organist. Of course we have choir of approx ten members.   Our organ has only one manual with five stops. Then I do want to make some ensemble with small organ, piano, violin, flute, bass recorder and percussions.   For prelude and postlude of the service, I am planning to play prelude and variations of C. Franck's "Prelude, Fuga and Variation" with organ and piano. This is the only piece which I know to play by small organ and piano. If you have other recommendable piece, please let me know.   And also, we are searching short pieces for violin, flute, bass recorder and with organ or piano.   If you have recommendable pieces which is appropriate to play in the service, please let me know.   The details of our musical service have not decided yet. And our pastor is agreed to modify the liturgy as far as possible. Yous assistance will be helpful to grow up our music level as a whole.   Kishimoto  
(back) Subject: Re: Refusable toe-tappers??? From: <Steskinner@aol.com> Date: Mon, 29 Jun 1998 06:14:20 EDT   In a message dated 98-06-26 22:43:16 EDT, you write:   << If you give me a FAX number, I'd be happy to send a copy of what I did with "This Little Light 'o Mine". Maybe you'll get some ideas >>   My church fax is (814) 454-3350 Thanks!   Steven Skinner First Presbyterian Church of the Covenant Erie, PA  
(back) Subject: Crystal Cathedral From: Charles Brown <clmoney@cybernex.net> Date: Mon, 29 Jun 1998 07:11:37 -0400         [Charles Brown]   If anyone watched the show from CC yesterday they would have heard of the "retirement" of Fred Swann. We all know that it was a long-time coming. I sincerely hope that Fred is happy in the new position he has accepted. Does anyone know who will be taking over the position?      
(back) Subject: Re: Musical Instruments in the Bible- Sackbut From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com> Date: Mon, 29 Jun 1998 07:57:01 -0500 (CDT)   At 11:31 PM 6/28/98 -0400, you wrote: > >...It is BOTH. 1. a medieval wind instrument, forerunner of the >trombone. AND 2. Bible- a stringed instrument resembling a lyre. >Websters New World Dictionary. > >It is NOT a manifestation of an obese condition.   It gets its name from its resemblance to a barrel of alcoholic beverage -- a but of sack.   John.