PipeChat Digest #433 - Tuesday, June 30, 1998
 
Re: Weddings and Funerals.
  by "KAREN R. CLIFTON" <karencl@worldnet.att.net>
Re: Wedding Guidelines
  by "KAREN R. CLIFTON" <karencl@worldnet.att.net>
Re: Sackbut
  by "Weber, Richard" <rweber@aero.net>
PSTOS On The Air, July 5th (x-posted)
  by "Tom Blackwell  425-957-8648" <tom@spry.com>
For Sale: Syndyne Pistons (x-posted)
  by "Tom Blackwell  425-957-8648" <tom@spry.com>
XPOST - 2nd image map up for my pix
  by "Jonathan M Orwig" <giwro@juno.com>
Re: Traditional Church Music
  by "Jason D. Comet" <bombarde8@juno.com>
Basement practice organ -- What do you think?
  by "Jason D. Comet" <bombarde8@juno.com>
Re: what's your opinion
  by "Dan Wilkinson" <dandub@gte.net>
Re: Organ & Piano, Ensemble Pieces Wanted
  by "bruce cornely" <cremona84000@webtv.net>
Applause
  by "Karen R. Clifton" <karencl@worldnet.att.net>
Re: Crystal Cathedral
  by <Jason418@aol.com>
Re: Evergreen
  by "Karen R. Clifton" <karencl@worldnet.att.net>
Re: HELLLLLO!!
  by "Shirley" <pnst@itw.com>
Re: Applause
  by "bruce cornely" <cremona84000@webtv.net>
Re: Applause
  by "Shirley" <pnst@itw.com>
Where are they now?
  by "Shirley" <pnst@itw.com>
Re: Evergreen
  by "bruce cornely" <cremona84000@webtv.net>
St. Luke's Lutheran, Sunbury, PA (was Re: Hot weather and C-3's)
  by "Kurt Kehler" <kmkehler@compuserve.com>
 


(back) Subject: Re: Weddings and Funerals. From: "KAREN R. CLIFTON" <karencl@worldnet.att.net> Date: Mon, 29 Jun 1998 00:07:20 -0700   Jen: Going back to your question of 6/22. Hymns are SUNG at weddings where you play? That's a new one to me. Generally hymns are not sung at weddings in my church, and more often than not, funerals either. It seems that you or somebody asks the bridal couple to choose hymns. I suggest that they not be asked. While we don't use hymns, it is not my practice to ask the couple what they want me to play as pre- service music. Sometimes, the bride will inquire about it, and my standard reponse is: "Well, I have a selection of music that I consider suitable for the purpose, and I ususally just choose from them. Of course if you have a something you'd particularly like to have......." Most times the bride just says, oh no, whatever you think..... Occasionally a bride will request one or two particular pieces, such as Jesu, Joy of Man's Desiring, or the Pachelbel Canon. Very rarely, a bride will want to hear my selection and choose from them. My system has worked quite well, and I recommend it. Funerals I handle the same way. Vocal selections for weddings are a different story! See separate post. Karen    
(back) Subject: Re: Wedding Guidelines From: "KAREN R. CLIFTON" <karencl@worldnet.att.net> Date: Mon, 29 Jun 1998 00:07:07 -0700   Hello: If your church does not have a printed set of wedding guidelines which are presented to brides upon reserving the church for the ceremony, I suggest you have one drawn up and use it. Ours covers all rules pertaining to the wedding: If something is to be thrown at the bride and groom, it must be birdseed and not rice; plastic sheeting must be placed beneath all candles; the charges, if any, for the use of the church facilities; Since the wedding is a sacred ceremony, all music must be sacred music, and the Director of Music Ministries must approve all vocal music chosen. This applies whether the wedding couple are church members or not. I'm not quoting - I don't have a copy before me. That last bit- the Director of Music approving the selections was a real boon to me. Years ago I got into a real hassle with a bride (the daughter of a good friend of mine) who wanted to use a popular song (containing lyrics that mentioned "your warm and tender body close to mine"). However desirable these sentiments might be, the lyrics were singularly inappropriate to a sacred ceremony. At the time, it was my job to make this decision, and the bride was adamant. She just kept insisting that this was what she wanted. We ended up compromising by changing the lyrics to something acceptable. Our Music Director was at all times aware of this conflict and my distress because I had known the bride since she was a child. Shortly after that, the Music Director came and told me that SHE was taking on this unpleasant task. She would make the decisions and she would take the flack. I was THRILLLLLED. She is a person of impeccable musical taste, and it has worked wonderfully well. I defer all questions about vocal selections to her, and she never hesitates to say no when necessary. So my bottom line advise to anyone interested is - pawn this job off on someone else if you can. The minister even. The guidelines are great and save a lot of grief. Lets the couple know up front what can and can not be. From the hot and steamy southeastern US. Karen      
(back) Subject: Re: Sackbut From: "Weber, Richard" <rweber@aero.net> Date: Sun, 28 Jun 1998 23:36:21 -0700   I must disagree with the usually accurate John Speller (sorry John). Sackbut comes from the Medieval French saquierboter, " pull and push." (From _The New College Encyclopedia of Music_ by J.A. Westrup and F. Harrison, W. W. Norton & Co. New York, 1960.   Yours,   Richard Weber    
(back) Subject: PSTOS On The Air, July 5th (x-posted) From: Tom Blackwell (NS/33) 425-957-8648 <tom@spry.com> Date: Mon, 29 Jun 1998 09:52:39 -0700   Theatre Organ fans in the Seattle-Tacoma area of the Pacific Northwest may want to tune to KING FM 98.1 on Sunday, July 5th 6:00AM or 10:00PM. Roger Sherman, host of the weekly "Organ Loft" program, will feature Northwest theatre organs during the July 5 program. PSTOS has provided recordings of several Northwest instruments to be used during the one-hour program. Roger will interview members of PSTOS who will discuss Northwest theatre organs and organists. The Organ Loft program is also available in many areas of Oregon and B.C. Canada through a widespread repeater network.   For more information, visit the PSTOS web site: http://www.pstos.org   Be sure to tune in on Sunday, July 5th at 6:00AM or 10:00PM!   Numerous updates and additions have been made to the PSTOS web site. Check the "What's New" page for a listing: http://www.pstos.org/site   Tom Blackwell Puget Sound Theatre Organ Society tom@pstos.org    
(back) Subject: For Sale: Syndyne Pistons (x-posted) From: Tom Blackwell (NS/33) 425-957-8648 <tom@spry.com> Date: Mon, 29 Jun 1998 11:32:15 -0700   I have the following available for sale:   25 Syndyne thumb pistons (New), ivory, standard #THPI, recently engraved by Hesco with original Wurlitzer font. These pistons will "press-fit" into existing Wurlitzer piston holes.   1 2 3 4 5 PP P MF F FF 1 2 3 4 5 PP P MF F FF 1 2 3 4 5   Enough pistons for 10 Accomp, 10 Solo and 5 Generals. These pistons have fine silver contacts and allow single or double touch operation. The product spec. sheet is available at: http://www.syndyne.com/thbprt.htm   $150. includes free shipping in U.S. (about 3/4 price of new)   Tom Blackwell Seattle, WA (425) 957-8648 tom@pstos.org    
(back) Subject: XPOST - 2nd image map up for my pix From: giwro@juno.com (Jonathan M Orwig) Date: Mon, 29 Jun 1998 13:00:05 -0700   Hi lists,   My second image map for my organ pix online is up at: http://members.aol.com/Giwro/organ1.html   I have also fixed the bad links from the first image map (I hope!)   Enjoy!   ***************** Jonathan Orwig Minister of Music - Bethany Church, Redlands, CA for new Organ, Keyboard & Choral Music visit Evensong Music at: http://members.aol.com/Evnsong/pgone.html Personal Page: http://members.aol.com/Giwro/index.html   _____________________________________________________________________ You don't need to buy Internet access to use free Internet e-mail. Get completely free e-mail from Juno at http://www.juno.com Or call Juno at (800) 654-JUNO [654-5866]  
(back) Subject: Re: Traditional Church Music From: bombarde8@juno.com (Jason D. Comet) Date: Sun, 28 Jun 1998 17:41:26 -0400   >Re: Evergreen at a wedding: >1. Go ahead and do it. >2. Charge an extra $100. >3. Improvise a choralvorspiel with c.f. in the pedal on "What I Did >for Money" >(A Chorus Line) for the concluding voluntary. >4. Go home and change into a nice cold martini and let your cares fade >away.   Good Idea! Jason Comet bombarde8@juno.com |\ | \ O   _____________________________________________________________________ You don't need to buy Internet access to use free Internet e-mail. Get completely free e-mail from Juno at http://www.juno.com Or call Juno at (800) 654-JUNO [654-5866]  
(back) Subject: Basement practice organ -- What do you think? From: bombarde8@juno.com (Jason D. Comet) Date: Sun, 28 Jun 1998 18:19:59 -0400   I am planning to build a small seven rank organ for the basement of my house. The rest of the rooms ore taken up being the dining room, living room, etc....   Here is the stoplist. And yes, I know, you have to have the basement nice and dry. I'm running the dehumidifier down there right now.   GREAT: (unenclosed) 3 rks 16 Quintadean A 8 Principal B 8 Bourdon C 8 Rohr Flute D 8 Quintadean A 4 Principal E 4 Rohr Flute D 4 Bourdon C 2 2/3 Principal E 2 2/3 Bourdon C 2 Principal E 2 Rohr Flute D 2 Bourdon C Gemshorn Mixture II-III F 16 Trumpet (fff) G 8 Trumpet (fff) G 4 Trumpet (fff) G 16 Melody Trumpet G 8 Melody Trumpet G 4 Melody Trumpet G Tremulant   SWELL: (enclosed) 2 rks. 16 Gedeckt H 8 Gedeckt H 8 Salicional I 8 Voix Celeste J 4 Gedeckt H 4 Salicional I 2 2/3 Gedeckt H 2 Gedeckt H 16 Oboe K 8 Trumpet (f) L 8 Oboe K 4 Trumpet L 4 Oboe K Tremulant 8 Trumpet (fff) G   CHOIR: (enclosed) 8 Hohl Flute M 8 Gemshorn F 4 Hohl Flute M 4 Gemshorn F 2 2/3 Gemshorn F 2 Hohl Flute M 2 Gemshorn F 1 3/5 Gemshorn F 1 1/3 Gemshorn F 8 Clarinet Tremulant 8 Trumpet (fff) G 8 Melody Trumpet G Melody Swell Reeds   ECHO: (expressive)(electric) 8 Cello 8 Cello Celeste 8 Flute Harmonique 8 Flute Celeste 8 Stopped Diapason 8 Vox Humana Tremulant Carillon   PEDAL: 32 Untersatz O 16 Principal B 16 SubaB P 16 Gedeckt H 16 Quintadean A 8 Principal B 8 SubaB P 8 Gedeckt H 8 Quintadean A 5 1/3 Gedeckt H 4 Principal B 4 SubaB P 4 Gedeckt H 4 Quintadean A 2 Gedeckt H 16 Trumpet G 16 Oboe K 8 Trumpet G 8 Oboe K 4 Trumpet G 4 Oboe K   COUPLERS: 16-uo-4 Great 16-uo-4 Swell 16-uo-4 Choir 8 G/P 8-4 S/P 8-4 C/P 16-8-4 S/G 16-8-4 S/C 16-8-4 C/G Swell Reeds Off All Swells to Swell (s/c/e/cresc.) Echo S Echo G Echo C Echo P   ****************************************** It may look big, but it is VERY versitile and small. I have designed it so I can indepenantly controll the volume of each individual division to be ideal to join the other. All pipes under 4' tall, the Qintadean ranks, and Salicional rank are electric using Peterson Voices. I didn't get too fancy with the stop names because I want to save money. The more I print, the more it will cost me. It doesn't mater what the name is, as long as it sounds like it's designed to and is easily understandable. An Oboe is an Oboe, not a Contra Hautbois, or a Houtbois Octave. The echo division is preped. If I can find a company that will build me a circuit card for that. (probably Johannus) Peterson Voices are great for the basses, but when you get up into the trebles on their flues, they don't sound that great. I'm only using tham because I wanted the Peterson company to like me. 8-/   Lat.... Jason Comet bombarde8@juno.com |\ | \ O   _____________________________________________________________________ You don't need to buy Internet access to use free Internet e-mail. Get completely free e-mail from Juno at http://www.juno.com Or call Juno at (800) 654-JUNO [654-5866]  
(back) Subject: Re: what's your opinion From: Dan Wilkinson <dandub@gte.net> Date: Mon, 29 Jun 1998 16:21:16 -0700   Hmmmmm...I had Wurli 4800 Church organ....but then being a theatre organist at heart....I bought two Leslies and put one on either side. I liked my Wurli, but when presented with the 3 manual Rodgers I had next, I traded it in. Although I never had a problem with my Wurli (other than the cat crawling in the swell shoe opening and bending the tubes a bit--Ha!), I agree with Shirley, it was a little thin sounding, but for an organ at home, it wasn't too bad.   Dan   At 03:45 PM 6/24/98 -0400, you wrote: >At 04:49 AM 6/24/98 -0500, you wrote: >>i would like to ask your opinions about why wurlitzer electronic home >>organs are so hard to find. even service and user manuals for them are >>difficult to find. are they that unpopular? my dad used to service >>organs and wurlitzer was his favorite. i have only played 2 organs in my >>lifetime a wurlitzer 4300 and the wurlitzer 4373 that i still have. what >>are your preffered home organs? > > >I was never a fan of the Wurli electronics.... too thin a sound. I don't >think they were made very well, either.... I recall people I knew that >owned them were having them fixed all the time. > >I think the preferred home organ is one that will suit the needs of the >player. For example, the Conn 651 we have in this house works for one of >us, not the other, since one of us has grown away from theatre organ (see >previous posts). I would much prefer a Rodgers church model in my living >room, but oh well.... I have the Moller at church I can always work on if I >want to practice the church music. > >As far as brand names, go with whatever sound satisfies you. If the >Wurlitzer works for you, then go for it. > > --Shirley >      
(back) Subject: Re: Organ & Piano, Ensemble Pieces Wanted From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Mon, 29 Jun 1998 19:58:13 -0400 (EDT)   The partitas of Johann Pachelbel might be interesting to consider. They would be easy to adapt to a one manual instrument, and you could also use instrumentalists on variations for variety. Vocalists could sing the CF while other instruments play the manual parts, etc.   bruce o h s __________ a g o cornely o o __________ o o ............. cremona84000@webtv.net .............   All knowledge, the totality of all questions and all answers, is contained in the dog. --Franz Kafka    
(back) Subject: Applause From: "Karen R. Clifton" <karencl@worldnet.att.net> Date: Mon, 29 Jun 1998 20:10:15 -0700   Hi: Any of you ever receive applause after your prelude in church? Until recently I never have - but twice recently it has happened - and I am sure the choir starts it - they sit right at my elbow. At next rehearsal I intend to thank them for the compliment and ask them not to do it any more. Applause was NEVER, but NEVER heard in a church service when I was growing up. Now it is an every Sunday event. It is almost always for a soloist, and the bad thing is that the congregation does not always applaud for every soloist. A soloist will sing at two or for all three morning services and get applause at one and not at another. I personally dislike applause in church because I believe that it focuses attention on the performance and performer rather than on the message. The organist at my childhood church once told me that the highest compliment she could receive was for someone to tell her that her playing was a worshipful experience for them, or that their heart was moved by her music. This meant much more to her (and to me) than all the accolades of how well you played, how beautiful the piece. My first applause (which stunned me speechless - it had never happened before in all my 32 years there) was for In Thee Is Gladness, arranged by Robert A. Hobby in his Three Hymns of Praise, Book Three. It is my all-time favorite piece - a toccata that is fantastic!!! That was on Mother's Day. This past Sunday I played for the first time Michael Burkhardt's Partita on Deo Gracias. And this part is funny. For the church secretary, I typed out: Partita on Deo Gracias - Michael Buckhardt Maestoso Larghetto Toccata In the bulletin she put: Partita on Deo Gracias M. Burkhardt Maestoso Larghetto Toccata I had used one line to save space. Oh well, most people don't notice any how. It is a wonderful work and I recommend it. There is another variation in the set that I didn't use because I liked it least and it is long. The three were right at seven minutes. Have any of you coped with the question of applause in church, and how have you handled it? How do you feel about it? I recently heard that another organist in town had managed to stop it in her church. I intend to find out how. Karen  
(back) Subject: Re: Crystal Cathedral From: <Jason418@aol.com> Date: Mon, 29 Jun 1998 19:51:25 EDT   Did we all catch Dr. Shuler's almost-slip when he began to recognize Dr. Swann? He started to say the eminent organist had resigned, got the re and a part of the si out, then hurriedly changed it to retired.   WK  
(back) Subject: Re: Evergreen From: "Karen R. Clifton" <karencl@worldnet.att.net> Date: Mon, 29 Jun 1998 20:45:08 -0700   Shirley, and whoever else is interested: Regarding your Evergreen problem You disallow it by showing mild surprise and shock at the suggestion. You say, Oh, but you see, it isn't a sacred song at all, and we (practice saying "we" and not "I") only use sacred music at weddings because weddings are a sacred worship service. Oh, there are so many lovely sacred songs we could use - and start naming them. In other words, nip it in the bud and then move quickly on to helping her find something she'll like equally well. Of course, she'd already told you this, so it is probably too late to use this tack in this particular situation. But next time...... My opinion is that if it is used in your particular wedding, it doesn't matter a fig who plays it. If it's going to be used, you may as well play it yourself. The point is NOT who plays it. The point is that you feel it is inappropriate and shouldn't be used at all. Karen  
(back) Subject: Re: HELLLLLO!! From: Shirley <pnst@itw.com> Date: Mon, 29 Jun 1998 21:32:37 -0400   At 05:08 PM 6/28/98 -0400, you wrote: >Now I am working on the doxology. The Old 100th to Last Un Erfreuen >(?spelling) > > >Jason Comet >bombarde8@juno.com       Jason, we used to use that tune every so often. You might try to ease your congregation into it, maybe use it only on Communion Sundays, for example, and Old Hundredth for the rest of the Sundays in the month. Be sure to print the words in the bulletin, though.... it may be hard for people who aren't used to it to put words that are so strongly associated with another tune, to a new tune.   Just my tuppence.   --Shirley  
(back) Subject: Re: Applause From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Mon, 29 Jun 1998 21:50:03 -0400 (EDT)   I have experienced applause in church since about 1983 (in a Methodist Church). I was organist; the choir director loooooooved it, and would even turn to the congregation and smile a big toothy "Crest-grin" that would make Diane Bish envious! One Sunday when she was away, the choir did an a capella anthem which I directed. At the conclusion I kept my arms raised after the cut-off and walked back to the console with my arms in the air, as though something else was going to happen (one choir member said I looked like I was being "held up"); by the time I lowered my arms, the congregation forgot that they were going to applaud! Another time in that same church, we started a boy choir which I directed. The first time they sang, they were, um, uh, >awful. The congegation applauded like crazy. The second time the boys sang (about a month later) their offering was very polished and reverent. Following their anthem there was a hushed silence. After the service, the smallest boy in the choir asked, "why didn't they like us this time?" In my previous Methodist position, applause was the norm after anthems by the college choir, but not the parish choir. Applause often followed big French toccata postludes and big Bach toccatas. I remember working my bunz off to do "...and thanksgivings may follow" from Dan Locklair's "Rubrics"; it was met with an "indifferent annoyed silence", as if to say, "so..." Now, in an RC position, applause varies from Mass to Mass. Traditional Masses do not have applause unless "requested" by clergy, which is not often. The family Mass has occasional applause, although I have managed to eliminate it after the children sing by extending the "tag" on the conclusion of the anthems (with apologies to John Rutter!!), and having the children sing from the choir area and not from the chancel steps in "performance position." At the family Mass there is applause following the children's participation in the sermon/discussion. At the contemporary Mass applause is common following the final song, there usually being no postlude, unless some of the instrumentalists decide spontaneously that it would be fun to "jam on." I have not yet learned how to handle applause, simply standing still with my back to the "audience", the hair on the back of my neck standing as the blood rushes to my head and I break out in a cold sweat. I must confess that, back in '83, following a big applause after an anthem, standing, taking a big theatre bow, and then acknowledging the choir with a wide sweep of my arm, followed by another bow. The minister said (later), "that was as disgusting as the applause, but certainly appropriate under the circumstances." Applause always makes me feel uneasy and embarrassed in worship; must confess, however, that it feels pretty good at a recital!   bruce o h s __________ a g o cornely o o __________ o o ............. cremona84000@webtv.net .............   All knowledge, the totality of all questions and all answers, is contained in the dog. --Franz Kafka    
(back) Subject: Re: Applause From: Shirley <pnst@itw.com> Date: Mon, 29 Jun 1998 21:54:30 -0400   Karen, I wrote an article for a church newsletter where I was working as Director of Music a few years ago. I had received complaints from a few congregants who felt applause was out of place in the church service. So I needed to take a stand.   So I wrote something like this: If you are applauding because the music has brought you closer to God, or has helped you celebrate God's presence, then go for it. If, however, you are applauding because the choirs did a good job, please tell us after the service rather than applauding; we like compliments!   And then I addressed the Sunday School teachers something thus: I have noticed that the Sunday School children who are in attendance in the early part of the service often are encouraged to applaud for the Bell Choir. Is this what you want your students to take from this part of the worship service, that the bell choir did a "good job"?     Applause can be exceedingly inappropriate and ill-timed, and can interrupt the flow of the service. Case in point: Our pastor was so moved on Sunday to applaud for our two soloists, he started the applause. Of course the congregation joined in.... totally wrecked the mood we'd set. He didn't do it the second service. :)   But I still think motivation is at the heart of it. Sure, they want to encourage the little kids when they sing, for example. However, these kids also need to experience the reverence, awe, and respect of a church service.   I have received applause after my postlude some Sundays from the half dozen or so who regularly come into the loft to listen to the postludes. And that's ok. But after the Prelude? Sounds like they're well-intentioned, but misled. Maybe it's time for a lesson on what worship really is, and why there is a Prelude in the first place.   And then I would look at your programming. Are you putting concert-calibre, big-sounding pieces in as your prelude that would elicit applause? (I'm not familiar with either of the pieces you listed.)   Just some thoughts from the still-steamy-but-finally-cooling-off East Coast, USA.   --Shirley       At 08:10 PM 6/29/98 -0700, you wrote: >Hi: > Any of you ever receive applause after your prelude in church? >Until recently I never have - but twice recently it has happened - and >I am sure the choir starts it - they sit right at my elbow.  
(back) Subject: Where are they now? From: Shirley <pnst@itw.com> Date: Mon, 29 Jun 1998 22:02:01 -0400   Well, not so much where are THEY now, but one person in particular.   The name was Woody Wise, traveled in theatre organ circles, was from MD/VA, as far as I can remember. Quite a colorful history, too.   Please reply privately, since this man's history doesn't need to be public record... well, not here anyway! :)   --Shirley  
(back) Subject: Re: Evergreen From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Mon, 29 Jun 1998 22:10:55 -0400 (EDT)   Unless there is a guitar player for the "evergreenish" pieces, I prefer to do them myself so that I can at least try to make them non-bar-roomish and semi-reverent. The other approach is when they ask for something like that, burst into hilarious laughter and compliment them on their sense of humour; while your laughing share with them how funny it is especially because it was used at ALL FOUR of your sister's weddings for GOOD LUCK! hehehehehehe (tears streaming down your face(s) ). Seriously, ahem, I have resigned myself to the "threat" of this stuff, but my job (i.e. $$) is more important that trying to do something that is the job of the clergy. So, scripturally speaking, if this is a sin, it is not ours, and those who have caused us to stumple will suffer for the sin -- i.e., the clergy. So the upside is, not only do WE get paid, but the clergy gets in trouble with Him! heh heh.... is that poetic justice, or what? ;-)   bruce o h s __________ a g o cornely o o __________ o o ............. cremona84000@webtv.net .............   All knowledge, the totality of all questions and all answers, is contained in the dog. --Franz Kafka    
(back) Subject: St. Luke's Lutheran, Sunbury, PA (was Re: Hot weather and C-3's) From: "Kurt Kehler" <kmkehler@compuserve.com> Date: Tue, 30 Jun 1998 01:19:34 -0400   Roc,   Thanks for the information on Hammond oil. I have fond memories of a Hammond C-3 [? my memory] which St. Luke's Lutheran, Sunbury, PA, bought, and then sold, nine months later when the repairs to their pipe organ were completed. I think it had a 32' pedal, with a 25-note pedalboard. Would that be a C-3? St. Luke's had wonderful acoustics and parishioners, (the President of the Parish Council told me (late 1980's) that the congregation decided it would not replace their aging "red" Service Book and Hymnal with the "green" Lutheran Book of Worship until the _next_ hymnal was published.) :-) Their pipe organ was built and restored by a company from (near?) Philadelphia whose name began with an "S", and continued "Sh..." or "Sch..." Sorry for the vagueness but the console had no nameplate and I only heard the builders' name once or twice, ten years ago. Does anyone know the instrument or the builder?   Kurt Kehler