PipeChat Digest #282 - Monday, March 2, 1998
 
Re: David Lasky Music
  by bruce cornely <cremona84000@webtv.net>
Re: Holy Name Cathedral
  by bruce cornely <cremona84000@webtv.net>
Re: Atlantic City Organs
  by Harry C. Bellangy <harryb@acy.digex.net>
Re: Completely Wood Reed?
  by John L. Speller <jlspeller@stlnet.com>
Re: Holy Name Cathedral
  by John L. Speller <jlspeller@stlnet.com>
Radio City progress? Was: Re: Atlantic City Organs
  by Ron Yost <musik@tcsn.net>
Re: Holy Name Cathedral
  by bruce cornely <cremona84000@webtv.net>
Symphony Hall Organ
  by bruce cornely <cremona84000@webtv.net>
Re: David Lasky Music
  by Judy A. Ollikkala <71431.2534@compuserve.com>
Re: NEED HELP
  by FireAlarmz <FireAlarmz@aol.com>
Re: Symphony Hall Organ
  by John L. Speller <jlspeller@stlnet.com>
Re: Funeral,Requims
  by Glenda <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com>
Re: Completely Wood Reed?
  by Charles Krug <cdkrug@worldnet.att.net>
Re: Funeral,Requims
  by Judy A. Ollikkala <71431.2534@compuserve.com>
Funeral/Requiems
  by Judy A. Ollikkala <71431.2534@compuserve.com>
Re: Completely Wood Reed?
  by Prestant16 <Prestant16@aol.com>
Funeral
  by Ruth S Bird <theraven@istar.ca>
My first service
  by Kevin M. Simons <Kevin.M.Simons-1@ou.edu>
Re: Funeral,Requims
  by j nathan <jnatpat@sunsix.infi.net>
Re: My first service
  by Frank Johnson <usd465@horizon.hit.net>
Re: My first service
  by FireAlarmz <FireAlarmz@aol.com>
Fw: Organ Recital Review from Kansas City Star
  by Sheridan Mascall <sheridan.mascall@visionet.com.au>
 


(back) Subject: Re: David Lasky Music From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Sun, 1 Mar 1998 07:21:38 -0500   Sounds beautiful. Spec's please??   bruce cornely o o o __________ o o o ago (dean) ohs o o __________ o o  
(back) Subject: Re: Holy Name Cathedral From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Sun, 1 Mar 1998 07:24:34 -0500   It is really necessary to have high wind pressure for adequate volume of sound; wouldnt generous scaling compensate for blowing the pipe extremely hard?   bruce cornely o o o __________ o o o ago (dean) ohs o o __________ o o  
(back) Subject: Re: Atlantic City Organs From: "Harry C. Bellangy" <harryb@acy.digex.net> Date: Sun, 1 Mar 1998 07:38:28 -0500   Hi List ...   No, the Atlantic City Boardwalk Convention Hall is not a pile of rubble nor is there any intent to make it a parking lot. The Boardwalk Hall is closed for about two years so that its infrastructure can be upgraded to an entertainment venue that supports modern audio and video. Hockey is expected to return to the ice rink that is part of the original hall construction.   Dennis McGurk is still employed at the Hall and goes about his routine of maintaining and repairing the organs.   Harry Bellangy Secretary ACCHOS    
(back) Subject: Re: Completely Wood Reed? From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com> Date: Sun, 1 Mar 1998 07:11:22 -0600 (CST)   At 08:34 PM 2/28/98 EST, William wrote: > Yesterday I built a completely wooden reed boot. The block is maple and the >boot is maple. The shallot and tounge is cherry and the wedge is pine. It >works without a resonator. For the shallot I drilled a 1/2" hole in the >center of a 1" piece of wood, then put a dowel in the center and turned it >round on a lathe, would a square shallot work just as well? Will this work >for a bass octave of a 16' Posaune? If it has been used is it suggested, any >other suggestins about materials?   While it will work, the weak point will be the reed tongue, which if you want it to be stable over any length of time will need to be made of brass. Suitable brass sheet is readily available at craft stores, model train shops, etc. If you want to be able to tune the reed you will also need to add a tuning wire. Many organbuilders traditionally made their reeds, especially 16' pedal reeds, with wood shallots and resonators. What you have made, without a resonator, is basically a Regal type reed. A square shallot would probably produce a slightly different tone, and so would adding a resonator, which you might also make of wood. I suggest you experiment a bit and decide what works best for you.   John.    
(back) Subject: Re: Holy Name Cathedral From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com> Date: Sun, 1 Mar 1998 08:44:35 -0600 (CST)   At 07:24 AM 3/1/98 -0500, Bruce Cornely wrote: >It is really necessary to have high wind pressure for adequate volume of >sound; wouldnt generous scaling compensate for blowing the pipe >extremely hard?   It is important to remember that the difference between high pressure pipework and low pressure pipework is that in high pressure pipework the pressure is reduced more at the toehole than in low pressure pipework. Because it has been reduced at the toehole, the actual pressure inside the pipe is little if anything different. Blowing the pipe harder by increasing the size of the toehole (whether its large or small to start with) and increasing the cut-up as necessary to prevent overblowing, makes any pipe louder regardless of whether it is high pressure or low pressure. There seems to be a kind of "folk belief" that the sound of high pressure pipework "carries" further in a building than the sound of low pressure pipework, but I can see no scientific reason why this should be so. That is surely conditioned only by the air pressure in the building, not the pressure of the organ, isn't it? I personally think a pressure of at least 3 to 4 inches is necessary to voice the reeds well, but I see no reason why a large romantic style tracker organ on that sort of pressure should not prove excellent for use with an orchestra. Indeed, I would suggest the most successful concert organ built in recent years is just such an instrument -- viz. the Myerson Hall Fisk.   John.    
(back) Subject: Radio City progress? Was: Re: Atlantic City Organs From: Ron Yost <musik@tcsn.net> Date: Sun, 01 Mar 1998 09:25:48 -0800   At 07:38 AM 3/1/98 -0500, you wrote: >Hi List ... > >No, the Atlantic City Boardwalk Convention Hall is not a pile of rubble nor >is there any intent to make it a parking lot. The Boardwalk Hall is closed >for about two years so that its infrastructure can be upgraded to an >entertainment venue that supports modern audio and video. Hockey is expected >to return to the ice rink that is part of the original hall construction. > >Dennis McGurk is still employed at the Hall and goes about his routine of >maintaining and repairing the organs. >   Whew! Thanks, Harry! At least there is someone watching over things .. I hope this means we won't be hearing horror stories of contractors stomping on pipes, as has happened in other venues.   This reminds me .. anyone know how the Radio City Music Hall 'conversion' is going?? The Lady sure looked grand on the Grammy's (what little of it I could stand :)   Ron Yost, Paso Robles, Calif.  
(back) Subject: Re: Holy Name Cathedral From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Sun, 1 Mar 1998 13:45:57 -0500   I seem to recall from the time I studied there that the Cathedral of St. Philip in Atlanta had this type of flooring. Their acoustics have been significantly improved, I understand by report, but I don't know if the floor was involved. There was treatment to the porous walls and ceiling according to close sources.   bruce cornely o o o __________ o o o ago (dean) ohs o o __________ o o  
(back) Subject: Symphony Hall Organ From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Sun, 1 Mar 1998 13:51:58 -0500   OK! If we want symphony halls to have organs for use with symphony orchestras what kind of specification is going to fill the bill without breaking the treasury of the city to purchase and to maintain, and allowing that the instrument will require space in the building. If public buildings are going to have organs they need to be sensible in intial cost and especially in maintenance costs, including rebuilding and releathering. Specifications????   bruce cornely o o o __________ o o o ago (dean) ohs o o __________ o o  
(back) Subject: Re: David Lasky Music From: "Judy A. Ollikkala" <71431.2534@compuserve.com> Date: Sun, 1 Mar 1998 15:45:53 -0500   1933 Casavant specs will be along later, too busy right now with other things, including the inputting of stoplists onto our Region I AGO 1999 Website - check it out at: http://www.bershad.com/ago/  
(back) Subject: Re: NEED HELP From: FireAlarmz <FireAlarmz@aol.com> Date: Sun, 1 Mar 1998 16:04:39 EST   Dear listers- thanks to everyone who gave me ideas for music suitable for small pipe organ, either through Pipechat or privately. There are too many to reply to, so if you don't mind, I'll thank everyone here.   Peace, Bill Miller  
(back) Subject: Re: Symphony Hall Organ From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com> Date: Sun, 1 Mar 1998 15:46:02 -0600 (CST)   At 01:51 PM 3/1/98 -0500, Bruce Cornely wrote: >OK! If we want symphony halls to have organs for use with symphony >orchestras what kind of specification is going to fill the bill without >breaking the treasury of the city to purchase and to maintain, and >allowing that the instrument will require space in the building. >If public buildings are going to have organs they need to be sensible in >intial cost and especially in maintenance costs, including rebuilding >and releathering. Specifications????   To go with an orchestra what you want is the ability to produce a lot of noise without necessarily needing many manuals, quiet combinations or solo stops. Probably the ultimate along these lines was the Hook organ in the Coliseum in Boston, built for the National Peace Jubilee in 1869:   --- E. & G. G. Hook, Op. 497, 1869 ---   MANUAL C-d'''', 63 notes, divided treble/bass at tenor B/middle C:   16' Bourdon (double mouths in treble) 8' Flute a Pavillon (Bell Diapason) 8' Gamba (large scale in bass) 8' Doppel Flote (large scale in bass) 4' Octave (large scale in bass) 4' Violina (large scale in bass) 2' Super Octave (large scale in bass) V Rks. Grand Cornet (large scale in bass and treble) 16' Bombarde (large scale in bass) 8' Tuba Mirabilis (large scale in bass) 4' Clarion (large scale in bass) Tremulant Octave Coupler   PEDAL C-d' 27 notes   16' Grand Sub Bass 10.2/3' Quint 8' Flute 16' Posaune 8' Ophycleide Manual to Pedal   COMBINATIONS   Full Organ. With reeds and all stops. Tuba, Flute a Pavillon & Doppel Flote. 16', 8' and 4' reeds. Full organ without reeds. Flute a Pavillon, Doppel Flote & Octave.   The whole instrument was voiced on 10" wind, with tubular-pneumatic action. What's more it was hand blown.   Regards,   John.    
(back) Subject: Re: Funeral,Requims From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com> Date: Sun, 1 Mar 1998 05:46:54 -0800   I have a big favor to ask, if you don't mind too terribly. The only words I know to "Thaxted" are "I vow to thee, my country". Would you mind e-mailing me the words Judy spoke of - "O God, beyond all praising"? If it's too much trouble, don't worry about it, but I would much appreciate it.   On this vein, does anyone have a set of English lyrics/words to Bach's "Bist du bei mir"? The only words I have in English start "If you are here, with what contentment . . ." (those words are more appropriate for weddings - I hoped for something a little more church service appropriate). My little boy voice student is learning this and Faure's Pie Jesu. It's always fun trying to teach Southerners Latin - my own Southern dialect REEKS, so it's hard to be a role model!   Thanks a WHOLE BUNCH!   Glenda Sutton      
(back) Subject: Re: Completely Wood Reed? From: "Charles Krug" <cdkrug@worldnet.att.net> Date: Sun, 1 Mar 1998 20:39:03 -0500   > Yesterday I built a completely wooden reed boot. The block is maple and the >boot is maple.   So how does it sound?        
(back) Subject: Re: Funeral,Requims From: "Judy A. Ollikkala" <71431.2534@compuserve.com> Date: Sun, 1 Mar 1998 20:52:59 -0500   O God, beyond all praising. We worship you today And sing the love amazing That songs can-not re-pay; For we can only won-der At ev-'ry gift you send, At bles-sings without number And mer-cies without end: We lift our hearts be-fore you And wait upon your word. We honor and a-dore you, Our great and might-y Lord.   Then hear, O gra-cious Sav-ior, Accept the love we bring, That we who know your fa-vor May serve you as our king; And whether our to-mor-rows Be filled with good or ill, We'll tri-umph through our sor-rows And rise to bless you still: To mar-vel at your beau-ty And glo-ry in your ways, And make a joy-ful du-ty Our sa-cri-fice of praise.   Text by Mixhael Perry, b. 1942 Hope Publishing Company THAXTED Gustave Holst 1874-1934  
(back) Subject: Funeral/Requiems From: "Judy A. Ollikkala" <71431.2534@compuserve.com> Date: Sun, 1 Mar 1998 20:53:00 -0500   O God, beyond all praising. We worship you today And sing the love amazing That songs can-not re-pay; For we can only won-der At ev-'ry gift you send, At bles-sings without number And mer-cies without end: We lift our hearts be-fore you And wait upon your word. We honor and a-dore you, Our great and might-y Lord.   Then hear, O gra-cious Sav-ior, Accept the love we bring, That we who know your fa-vor May serve you as our king; And whether our to-mor-rows Be filled with good or ill, We'll tri-umph through our sor-rows And rise to bless you still: To mar-vel at your beau-ty And glo-ry in your ways, And make a joy-ful du-ty Our sa-cri-fice of praise.   Text by Mixhael Perry, b. 1942 Hope Publishing Company THAXTED Gustave Holst 1874-1934  
(back) Subject: Re: Completely Wood Reed? From: Prestant16 <Prestant16@aol.com> Date: Sun, 1 Mar 1998 20:59:20 EST   It sounds like a wood reed! Actually It have a very distinct fundimental which I did not expect becuase it has no resonator. It is a little undtable, but this is just a test pipe. I will probably make two or three more test pipes before I build the set. I think I will go with the suggestion of Brass tounges. It does not raise the price too much and it is more stable than wood. I will probably use square shallots that are parallel. The resonators will probably be 1/4 length made of poplar.   I do have some more questions: Does anybody know how the shallots half? on the 17th like a flue pipe or is it completely differant. What is the length of a 16' CCC shallot? What should the width be for a 16' CCC shallot? How do the resonators graduate up the rank, does the width and depth half on a certain pipe?   Thanks, -William  
(back) Subject: Funeral From: Ruth S Bird <theraven@istar.ca> Date: Sun, 01 Mar 1998 21:12:47 -0500   Thank your very much, everyone for your help, it is really appreciated. I am cruising the net finding some of the midis ( and still trying to find others) that you have suggested for me.   Thanks, Yours, Ruth    
(back) Subject: My first service From: "Kevin M. Simons" <Kevin.M.Simons-1@ou.edu> Date: Sun, 01 Mar 1998 20:49:45 -0600   Howdy List,   Well, today was my first day at St. Thomas More, leading the congregation. It was fantastic. The people really responded well to the organ, and my playing was pretty good. I had a line of people after the postlude to tell me how wonderful it was to hear the organ again. In fact, some asked if the organ could get any louder. I assured them that it would, but not until Easter!   Thank you all for your encouragement and kind notes. It was wonderful to have your support.   Have a wonderful week everyone   Kevin M. Simons Organist, St. Thomas More Catholic Church Norman, Oklahoma  
(back) Subject: Re: Funeral,Requims From: j nathan <jnatpat@sunsix.infi.net> Date: Sun, 01 Mar 1998 21:30:23 -0600   Glenda wrote: > > I have a big favor to ask, if you don't mind too terribly. The only words > I know to "Thaxted" are "I vow to thee, my country". Would you mind > e-mailing me the words Judy spoke of - "O God, beyond all praising"?       Dear Glenda ~   If someone else has already responded with this answer, I'm sorry...but have you seen the Richard Proulx concertato on this piece? Really a tasteful arrangement, nice writing, and always a crowd pleaser since I discovered it. Don't know what you were interested in this piece for, but might just be what you are looking for! Good luck!   S.D.G.   J Nathan Patton  
(back) Subject: Re: My first service From: usd465@horizon.hit.net (Frank Johnson) Date: Sun, 1 Mar 1998 21:38:03 -0600   >Howdy List, > >Well, today was my first day at St. Thomas More, leading the >congregation. It was fantastic. The people really responded well to >the organ, and my playing was pretty good. I had a line of people after >the postlude to tell me how wonderful it was to hear the organ again. >In fact, some asked if the organ could get any louder. I assured them >that it would, but not until Easter! > >Thank you all for your encouragement and kind notes. It was wonderful >to have your support.   Kevin you can't imagine this but after having chatted with you on here, I feel quite close to your situation. For someone who has never met you I really was anxious to hear about your first service. I had about 40 notes to check through between my dixieland jazz list and the organ chat list. Yours was the second one I read after having looked through them all.   Congratulations young man. I AM proud of your first Sunday!   Frank   Frank R. Johnson (KA0API) Spirit of New Orleans - clarinet/leader http://www.hit.net/~usd465/ 1922 E. 14th Winfield, KS 67156      
(back) Subject: Re: My first service From: FireAlarmz <FireAlarmz@aol.com> Date: Sun, 1 Mar 1998 22:36:36 EST     << In fact, some asked if the organ could get any louder >>   WOW!!! What a delicious 'problem'........     Bill Miller  
(back) Subject: Fw: Organ Recital Review from Kansas City Star From: sheridan.mascall@visionet.com.au (Sheridan Mascall) Date: Mon, 2 Mar 1998 19:57:55 +1100   Anyone get to this? - Found it in the Sunday edition of the Kansas City Star newpaper.   Regards,~Sheridan~       >Organ extravaganza > >Lovers of organ music got a windfall last weekend at the RLDS Church >headquarters in Independence. John Obetz, wrapping up 31 years as the >church's principal organist, divided his official farewell recital >(reviewed Feb. 22) between the RLDS Auditorium and Temple. John Ditto (on >Feb. 20) and Martin Haselboeck (Feb. 22) stuck to the Temple. > >Ditto opened with appealing recent works by Pamela Decker (a pleasantly >piquant Toccata) and Libbey Larsen (a mostly gentle Fantasy on "Slane," the >hymn tune associated with the words "Lord of all hopefulness"). Flutist >Mary Posses was the fluent collaborator in the Larsen, and the composer >herself took a bow. > >Ditto brought an enfolding eloquence to Cesar Franck's "Priere" (ooh, those >sumptuous foundation stops) and grand rhetorical flair to Joseph Bonnet's >"Concert Variations." > >Just occasionally he sounded less than wholly comfortable in the vast >reaches of Julius Reubke's flamboyant Sonata "The 94th Psalm." But >vengeance was hailed down on the unrighteous in no uncertain terms -- the >ending was hair-raising -- and the widow and stranger were tenderly cared >for. > >Ditto's playing had a wonderfully physical quality to it, a visceral sense >of the music's stresses and releases. Haselboeck, by contrast, brought such >extremes of push-me-pull-me rubato that it often was impossible to guess >the music's meter. > >This was playing strictly for the moment, not for the overview. And too >many of the moments were either disruptive distentions or cheap rushes that >turned into incomprehensible blurs. The effect was like coming down stairs >of erratic heights, with the odd banana peel here and there. > >Jehan Alain's "Three Dances" are based on rhythms whose carefully >calculated irregularities must be crystal-clear. Haselboeck caught the >music's very real drama, but at the price of muddling, whether willfully or >carelessly, the rhythms. > >Both here and in Liszt's Fantasy and Fugue on "Ad nos," Haselboeck was too >enamored with thick manual and woofing pedal registrations. And there ought >to be a law against adding organs' horizontal trumpet stops -- meant for >solo use -- to full-organ registrations. > >Maybe Haselboeck had seen one too many of those bumper stickers that say >"Honk if you love Jesus." Whatever the cause, he gave us so many blasts of >the chamade trumpets that at least one audience member was ready to scream. >Make him stop. >