PipeChat Digest #291 - Wednesday, March 11, 1998
 
An appeal for different Easter brass parts
  by E. Margo Dillard <emd0002@jove.acs.unt.edu>
Re: Sheetrock
  by bruce cornely <cremona84000@webtv.net>
Re: Sheetrock
  by bruce cornely <cremona84000@webtv.net>
Re: Sheetrock
  by DaveW10140 <DaveW10140@aol.com>
Fwd: Music Humor in Quotes
  by Myosotis51 <Myosotis51@aol.com>
Re: Lenten Postludes, etc.
  by <George.Greene@rossnutrition.com>
Re: Sheetrock
  by Rick Williams <Rick@netlink.nlink.com>
Praise choruses
  by Kenneth O. Woods <kow987@dice.crane.navy.mil>
Once in Royal David's City
  by karencl@worldnet.att.net <karencl@worldnet.att.net>
Re: Once in Royal David's City in TAO, March 1998
  by Mark Harris <M.Harris@Admin.lon.ac.uk>
Re: Once in Royal David's City in TAO, March 1998
  by ScottFop <ScottFop@aol.com>
Totally Off-Subject Question for British Listers
  by Vernon Moeller <vernonm@ccsi.com>
Re: Sheetrock
  by B. Morgan Martin <MORGANM@pacbell.net>
Re: Fwd: Music Humor in Quotes
  by Ken <mewzishn@spec.net>
Concert: Newark, NJ Sacred Heart Cathedral IV/154 Schantz 3/15 4pm
  by Adam Levin <alevin@advance.net>
Re: Once in Royal David's City in TAO, March 1998
  by karencl@worldnet.att.net <karencl@worldnet.att.net>
Re: Sheetrock
  by Kevin Cartwright <kevin1@alaweb.com>
Best Music theory  pc software? (mostly non-organic)
  by Patricia R. Maimone <patmai@juno.com>
 


(back) Subject: An appeal for different Easter brass parts From: "E. Margo Dillard" <emd0002@jove.acs.unt.edu> Date: Tue, 10 Mar 1998 06:31:19 -0600 (CST)   Does anyone happen to have the trumpet parts to Natalee Sleeth's "Joy in the Morning"? I know we had them; we have used them before. But we have reorganized the music filing since last year and thrown out a bunch of useless stuff. I have this awful feeling they got thrown out by accident. Can't find them anywhere... (By the way, if you happen to have copies of this anthem from the first printing, the trumpet parts were on the back page - since then, they have been printed separately.)   Thanks! Margo Dillard First United Methodist Church Lewisville, Texas   **************************************************************************** SURVEY OF MUSCULOSKELETAL PAIN OF ORGANISTS www.metronet.com/~organmed/ **************************************************************************** "There is nothing remarkable about it. All one has to do is hit the right notes at the right time, and the instrument plays itself." -- J. S. Bach "We suffer, we suffer, we suffer in silence." -- Fiddler on the Roof ****************************************************************************    
(back) Subject: Re: Sheetrock From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Tue, 10 Mar 1998 07:45:51 -0500   Good point, Kurt! I think building the room for the organ would be almost as much fun as building the organ itself; not to mention good experience in itself. And think of all the "spare time" trouble Kevin would be avoiding (uh, not that Kevin is trouble prone). That's a good one to lay on the parents: "But Mom and Dad, you'd always know where I am, and I wouldn't need the car to get there!!"   bruce cornely o o o __________ o o o ago (dean) ohs o o __________ o o  
(back) Subject: Re: Sheetrock From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Tue, 10 Mar 1998 07:49:43 -0500   Nice installation, Kurt. And those four stops (cubed, crushed, light, water) will be so much more useful since they are enclosed!! Later, of course, you can add the antiphonal at the wet bar! happy practicing...   bruce cornely o o o __________ o o o ago (dean) ohs o o __________ o o  
(back) Subject: Re: Sheetrock From: DaveW10140 <DaveW10140@aol.com> Date: Tue, 10 Mar 1998 08:20:28 EST   In a message dated 98-03-09 22:44:14 EST, you write:   << So, will the organ sound through one half-inch layer of sheetrock (and not sound like a bad radio)? I need something reasonable to tell them. >>   I think it would sound like an AM radio in a tin can. Your idea is best. It should not cost much to put a few pieces of sheet rock back in when you move out.   Dave W  
(back) Subject: Fwd: Music Humor in Quotes From: Myosotis51 <Myosotis51@aol.com> Date: Tue, 10 Mar 1998 08:36:01 EST       > Music humor quotes > >--------------------------------------------------------------- > > "He'd be better off shoveling snow." > > --Richard Strauss on Arnold Schoenberg. > > > > When told that a soloist would need six fingers to perform > > his concerto, Arnold Schoenberg replied, "I can wait." > > > > "I would like to hear Elliot Carter's Fourth String Quartet, if > > only to discover what a cranky prostate does to one's polyphony." > > --James Sellars > > > > "Exit in case of Brahms." > > --Philip Hale's proposed inscription over the doors of Boston > > Symphony Hall > > > > "Why is it that whenever I hear a piece of music I don't like, > > it's always by Villa-Lobos?" --Igor Stravinsky > > > > "His music used to be original. Now it's aboriginal." > > --Sir Ernest Newman on Igor Stravinsky > > > > "If he'd been making shell-cases during the war it might have been > > better for music." --Maurice Ravel on Camille Saint-Saens > > > > "He has an enormously wide repertory. He can conduct > > anything, provided it's by Beethoven, Brahms or Wagner. He > > tried Debussy's La Mer once. It came out as Das Merde." > > --Anonymous Orchestra Member on George Szell > > > > Someone commented to Rudolph Bing, manager of the > > Metropolitan Opera, that "George Szell is his own worst > > enemy." "Not while I'm alive, he isn't!" said Bing. > > > > "Madam, you have between your legs an instrument capable of > > giving pleasure to thousands and all you can do is scratch it." > > --Sir Thomas Beecham to a lady cellist. > > > > "After I die, I shall return to earth as a gatekeeper of a > > bordello and I won't let any of you enter." > > --Arturo Toscanini to the NBC Orchestra > > > > "We cannot expect you to be with us all the time, but perhaps you > > could be good enough to keep in touch now and again." --Sir Thomas > > Beecham to a musician during a rehearsal > > > > "Jack Benny played Mendelssohn last night. Mendelssohn lost." > > --Anonymous > > > > The great German conductor Hans von Buelow detested two > > members of an orchestra, who were named Schultz and > > Schmidt. Upon being told the Schmidt had died, von Buelow > > immediately asked, "Und Schultz?" > > > > "Her voice sounded like an eagle being goosed." > > --Ralph Novak on Yoko Ono > > > > "Parsifal - the kind of opera that starts at six o'clock and > > after it has been going three hours, you look at your watch > > and it says 6:20." --David Randolph > > > > "One can't judge Wagner's opera Lohengrin after a first > > hearing, and I certainly don't intend hearing it a second time." > > --Gioacchino Rossini > > > > "I liked the opera very much. Everything but the music." > > --Benjamin Britten on Stravinsky's The Rakes's Progress > > > > "Her singing reminds me of a cart coming downhill with the > > brake on." > > --Sir Thomas Beecham on an unidentified soprano in Die > > Walkyre  
(back) Subject: Re: Lenten Postludes, etc. From: George.Greene@rossnutrition.com Date: Tue, 10 Mar 1998 08:53:25 -0500   I was catching up on my Pipechat reading last night and I came across some of the elctronic crossfire regarding Randy T.'s dilemma where it appeared that he might be forced to play the Jeopardy! theme at the end of services during Lent. Please don't shoot me for resurrecting this thread, but a thought came to mind as I was reading: is the Jeopardy music really THAT much worse than the "praise choruses" that many of us are forced to play and/or endure every week? (One writer in TAO expressed my thoughts pretty well when they said something to the effect that most of them are about as uplifting as "Pop Goes the Weasel.")   Anyway, our pastor wanted to string together six of the little ditties, in three different keys, on a recent Sunday night, but we finally talked him into cutting it to five choruses in two keys. Of course, in the time it took to sing five choruses (with repetition ad nauseum, which seems to be a requirement for so-called "praise and worship music") we could have sung a couple of REAL hymns!   Preparing to "stop, drop and roll" when the flames hit,     2222222 2 2222222 2 George Greene __ ___o 2222222 Voice 614-624-3362, FAX 614-624-7270 _____ _`\ <._ GGGGGGGG George.Greene@RossNutrition.Com ___ (_)/ (_) G Analytical Chemist, Intrepid Bicyclist, G GGGG and Alleged Organist G G GGGGGGGG    
(back) Subject: Re: Sheetrock From: "Rick Williams" <Rick@netlink.nlink.com> Date: Tue, 10 Mar 1998 08:22:11 -0600   get ready to experience the =22bad radio=22 syndrome. sheetrock, although = not a great sound deadener, would be deadly to organ pipes.   >>> Kevin Cartwright <kevin1=40alaweb.com> 03/09/98 09:37PM >>> I just have to ask a stupid question. I am trying to get an organ into a house that does not have room for it. I want to place the expression shades behind a current wall. I wanted to removed the sheetrock and insulation, and brace the expression shades and the grills to the studs left behind. That way, I wouldn=27t have to remove the entire wall, but the organ could sound through it as well. My parents, instead of using the grills, want to leave one layer of sheetrock in order to lessen the repair work after we move out (whenever that is). So, will the organ sound through one half-inch layer of sheetrock (and not sound like a bad radio)? I need something reasonable to tell them.   THANKS=21=21   Kevin Cartwright Greenville, Alabama kevin1=40alaweb.com=20   =22Pipe Up and Be Heard=21=22 PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org=20 List: mailto:pipechat=40pipechat.org=20 Administration: mailto:admin=40pipechat.org=20 Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests=40pipechat.org=20   = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = =20  
(back) Subject: Praise choruses From: kow987@dice.crane.navy.mil (Kenneth O. Woods) Date: Tue, 10 Mar 98 9:33:17 EST   George writes: <snip> is the Jeopardy music really THAT much worse than the "praise choruses" that many of us are forced to play and/or endure every week? (One writer in TAO expressed my thoughts pretty well when they said something to the effect that most of them are about as uplifting as "Pop Goes the Weasel.") <snip> My thoughts exactly, and can't he see the doleful faces in the congregation during the "singing" of these choruses? In partial defense of the minister's insistence to keep the choruses in the service, he gets the idea that this is the way to go from his boss and his boss's boss etc etc. 5 choruses every Sunday in 3 worships services and only 2 hymns, the last one being sung maybe one Sunday per month because there's no time left.   -- Kenneth O. Woods kow987@dice.crane.navy.mil  
(back) Subject: Once in Royal David's City From: "karencl@worldnet.att.net" <karencl@worldnet.att.net> Date: Tue, 10 Mar 1998 11:02:24 -0800   We were discussing this lovely carol a week or so ago. In the March issue of The American Organist on page 16 you will find "A Carol For Church Musicians" written by Marcia Van Oyen for this tune which we can all identify with. If you missed it, look it up. It's a gem. Karen  
(back) Subject: Re: Once in Royal David's City in TAO, March 1998 From: "Mark Harris" <M.Harris@Admin.lon.ac.uk> Date: Tue, 10 Mar 1998 16:13:33 GMT   How can we see it who live on this side of the pond?   Mark Harris =========  
(back) Subject: Re: Once in Royal David's City in TAO, March 1998 From: ScottFop <ScottFop@aol.com> Date: Tue, 10 Mar 1998 11:24:57 EST   In a message dated 98-03-10 11:19:59 EST, you write:   << How can we see it who live on this side of the pond? Mark Harris >>   Join the AGO and get the magazine  
(back) Subject: Totally Off-Subject Question for British Listers From: Vernon Moeller <vernonm@ccsi.com> Date: Tue, 10 Mar 1998 11:12:12 -0600   Would one of you kind British listers please explain to me (privately, of course) how your residential telephone billing system works? I'm trying to help get some friends "over there" onto the InterNet.   Thanks mucho, \/\/\    
(back) Subject: Re: Sheetrock From: "B. Morgan Martin" <MORGANM@pacbell.net> Date: Tue, 10 Mar 1998 09:15:36 -0800   Hi Kevin! Re your sheetrock question - Sheetrock is used the world over as a means of stopping the sound getting from one room into another: every recording studio, every TV studio, etc. uses it for just this purpose. Ture they use three or four or five layes, the reason being that if they have a pipe organ in the studio, they don't want to hear it through the walls in the control room - they want to hear it only via the microphones that they put in the studio!   Here is a way to demonstrate how well even a little piece of plasic stops sound -- try to find an electrical outlet in one room that lines up with another in the adjoining room - in more modern houses, if you take the face plate off of one or the other, you'll see that they share a common mounting box, so one box holds the plugs for both rooms. Now that you have the cover off already get down by the plug without the cover on it and talk, with a helper listening in the other room. THen put back on the plastic cover and talk again. You will be surprised, perhpas, at how much that thin little plastic cover cuts down on the sound. Also note how it tends to cut down more on the high frequencies than the lower onews.   Sheetrock will act pretty much the same way. Even one layer will drastically reduce the overall volume, and will expecially be hard on the higher pitches.   Also, the sheetrock will significantly reduce any effect opening and closing the shades will have, so you would loose much of your control over dynamics.   Hope this helps!   B. Morgan Martin  
(back) Subject: Re: Fwd: Music Humor in Quotes From: Ken <mewzishn@spec.net> Date: Tue, 10 Mar 1998 12:22:10 +0000   Probably the best Beecham quote is the one where he'd been asked if he'd heard any Stockhausen.   "No, but I've trodden in a few."     Ken Sybesma        
(back) Subject: Concert: Newark, NJ Sacred Heart Cathedral IV/154 Schantz 3/15 4pm From: Adam Levin <alevin@advance.net> Date: Tue, 10 Mar 1998 14:27:04 -0500 (EST)     Here's more detail:   Posted by: Adam Levin(alevin@advance.net) Date: March 15, 1998 Time: 04:00PM Country: US State: NJ Region: City: Newark Zipcode: 07104 Performer: Christopher Lee, Violinist Venue: Cathedral Basilica of the Sacred Heart Cost: $10.00 suggested donation Comments: Music for the Heart -- World renowned perform and Concert Master of the New Jersey Symphony since 1982, Christopher Lee joins Organist David Fedor in a program featuring music for organ and violin by Rachmaninoff, Vaughan Williams, Bach, and ot hers. A truly special concert! For more information or directions, call (973)484-4600   This will be a very mellow, "not louder than mf" concert. Alas, I am unable to attend, but the organ is fabulous for gentle, subtle orchestral works, so I strongly recommend you attend if that's your interest. It promises to be a very special concert.   -Adam      
(back) Subject: Re: Once in Royal David's City in TAO, March 1998 From: "karencl@worldnet.att.net" <karencl@worldnet.att.net> Date: Tue, 10 Mar 1998 17:51:03 -0800   Mark Harris wrote: > > How can we see it who live on this side of the pond?   By reading on:   A CAROL FOR CHURCH MUSICIANS By Marcia Van Oyen Tune: Irby (Once in Royal David's City)   Once in north suburban Chicago, stood some churches grand and fair, Where musicians diligently labored, leading all in worship there. Playing hymns, directing choirs, to praise God did they aspire.   Through the Advent carols and lessons, to their duties they adhered. Onward to the Sunday School pageant, carol sing: they perservered. Their parish'ners gently guiding to the day of Christmas tidings.   In the pattern of December, day by day the challenges grew, Patience tested, psyches wilting, tears and smiles they daily knew. Though they labored ever harder, trials came, like these for starters:   Tantrums thrown by prima donnas, harpsichord way out of tune, Tenor ill with laryngitis, orchestra that played too soon, Congregation chatting loudly, zealous parents clapping proudly.   All of this, with great forbearance, these musicians did endure, Through each new success and mishap with their choirs amateur, All to fete the Incarnation, yet they longed for a vacation.   And their eyes at last did see it, long December past had sped, Though the month had seemed so endless, now was all accomplished, And received with great eclat, SOLI DEO GLORIA. (Composed for the December issue of "Overtones", the newsletter of the North Shore AGO Chapter)  
(back) Subject: Re: Sheetrock From: Kevin Cartwright <kevin1@alaweb.com> Date: Tue, 10 Mar 1998 18:18:59 -0600   > Good point, Kurt! > I think building the room for the organ would be almost as much fun as > building the organ itself; not to mention good experience in itself. > And think of all the "spare time" trouble Kevin would be avoiding (uh, > not that Kevin is trouble prone). That's a good one to lay on the > parents: "But Mom and Dad, you'd always know where I am, and I wouldn't > need the car to get there!!" > > bruce cornely o o o __________ o o o > ago (dean) ohs o o __________ o o   Did I mention a car in my previous post? Well, my mother is "driving" the point home that I need a car "before an organ." I told her that a $1,000 car is not going to get me anywhere for long...so why not an organ. We still have the 5, maybe 6 or 15 fights a week over organ vs. car. Actually, we do have a nice outbuilding that would need to be insulated, climate controlled, and not to mention adding power. It's 12x16' and has 8' rafters (of course 2' apart). The roof above the rafters varies from 8' to 12'. The organ I want is meant for about a 10'x6' and 10' tall space.   And yes, I'm trouble prone...of course not in the legal sense. I should say "I always have a lot of trouble getting the things I want to do done without interference."   <<No, if you are putting in an organ I would not leave the Sheetrock up, but it would be fairly simple to replace it once you take the organ out. Just rehang the wall board and putty & paint. You could install the swell shades right behind the studs, leaving them in place!   Randy>>   I told them that...according to them, it takes an act of God to replace sheetrock. The Moller grills come with the organ, so I figured I couls have a little expression shade/studs/grills 'sandwich' if you will.   << Specs: (cross-posted to Refrig-L) One rank (with minimal unification) Four stops: Cubed Crushed Light Water Pipework: one copper 16' 1/4" flexible pipe There are no plans for a combination action at this time.   Kurt Kehler>>   Yes. I thought our ice crusher would make a good thunder sim. stop for a theatre organ. :->   Anyway, thanks for the comments!!   Kevin C. mailto:kevin1@alaweb.com  
(back) Subject: Best Music theory pc software? (mostly non-organic) From: patmai@juno.com (Patricia R. Maimone) Date: Wed, 11 Mar 1998 00:31:14 -0500   Hello, Pipechatters,   Any recommendations for music theory/ear training pc software for high school students, some of whom might write a composition for the organ someday? (Necessary organic connection here ;-)   One colleague has checked out demos of MiBac Music Lessons and Auralia and prefers Auralia. He objects to MiBac's training students that in 6/8 time the eighth note gets the beat instead of the dotted quarter.   The subject matter seems to be ideally suited to individual computer tutorials. Looking for the best possible program.. Would appreciate any help from list members or nearby theorists/organ composers for obtaining the best possible program available now.   Pat Maimone yp6867@sunams.usma.army.mil patmai@juno.com     _____________________________________________________________________ You don't need to buy Internet access to use free Internet e-mail. Get completely free e-mail from Juno at http://www.juno.com Or call Juno at (800) 654-JUNO [654-5866]