PipeChat Digest #361 - Wednesday, May 6, 1998
 
Ten favorite recordings
  by "gregory@mke.earthreach.com" <gregory@mke.earthreach.com>
APOLOGY
  by "Ian B. McLean" <solotibia@enternet.com.au>
Teenage Organists and "emotional adjusting"
  by "Ruth" <theraven@istar.ca>
Chiff
  by <rnickel@itol.com>
Re: Chiff
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com>
Re: Teenage Organists - My lecture (very long, sorry)
  by "KZimme7737" <KZimme7737@aol.com>
Re: 10 CDs
  by "bruce cornely" <cremona84000@webtv.net>
Re:  My First Recital
  by "Ken and Chris Potter" <tracker@j51.com>
Re: Teenage Organists - My lecture (very long, sorry)
  by "Kevin M. Simons" <Kevin.M.Simons-1@ou.edu>
Re: Chiff
  by "bruce cornely" <cremona84000@webtv.net>
Re: Ten favorite recordings
  by "Dr Edward Peterson" <epeterso@madison.tdsnet.com>
Re: Teenage Organists - My lecture
  by "Bill 6827" <Bill6827@aol.com>
Re: Teenage Organists - My lecture (very long, sorry)
  by "bruce cornely" <cremona84000@webtv.net>
Re: Teenage Organists - My lecture (very long, sorry)
  by "Stephen Ohmer" <sohmer@juno.com>
Question on Gigout & his Toccata
  by "Vernon Moeller" <vernonm@ccsi.com>
Re: 10 CDs
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com>
Re: 10 CDs
  by "Stephen Ohmer" <sohmer@juno.com>
Re: Chiff
  by "Prestant16" <Prestant16@aol.com>
Bach Little Prelude And Fugue In C Major ( a little long)
  by "Beau Surratt" <beaupiano@earthlink.net>
Re: Teenage Organists - My lecture (very long, sorry)
  by "Frank Johnson" <usd465@horizon.hit.net>
 


(back) Subject: Ten favorite recordings From: "gregory@mke.earthreach.com" <gregory@mke.earthreach.com> Date: Wed, 6 May 98 06:42:11 -0600   Good morning:   It is interesting to read all the notes regarding favorite recordings. I must admit that I often turn on the radio to NPR instead of putting on a CD!   But...I did come across one outstanding recording recently titled:   Saint-Saens/Frank/Widor Die duos for Harmonium und Klavier Signum SIG X87.00   The playing is wonderful. The harmonium is a two manual Mustel (Paris) in excellent tune and repair. The piano is a Kawaii which sounds fine. The performers Johannes Mattias Michel, harmonium and Ernst Breidenbach, Klavier, are great musicians and technicians.   If you come across this recording, get it! (I found my copy at the Exclusive)   Tom Gregory Waukesha, WI USA  
(back) Subject: APOLOGY From: "Ian B. McLean" <solotibia@enternet.com.au> Date: Wed, 06 May 1998 21:51:08 +1000   In my TOSA Convention comments on this List, I made an error in fact. Even when what occurred right in front of me strongly evidenced what I wrote.   Lew Williams has pointed out to me that the MC for his Adelaide Concert, Malcolm Patterson, did NOT call him back and back for the four encores that occurred. This may have been how it looked, but, in fact, Lew has told me that Malcolm was actually telling him (Lew), to take a "bow" and then call it quits, or words to that effect.   So, my sincere apologies to Malcolm for this mistake.     Ian McLean  
(back) Subject: Teenage Organists and "emotional adjusting" From: Ruth <theraven@istar.ca> Date: Wed, 6 May 1998 08:01:37 -0400     As long as you are not a teenager "who plays better" with an attitude, there is no reason for anyone to think you of as being in a "lower" position. I would think you are an assistant, right?? At the same time, you have to admit, that all teenagers who play better then the "oldies" cannot always replace these oldies. Teenagers grow up, (sometimes) and move on to different places. Besides, playing better is not always the most advantageous consideration. On the other hand, it is also absolutely horrible having a "superior" with an attitude. I hope you hang in graciously, I am sure you will enjoy your music the rest of your life, and one day treat your "assistant" better and with more respect.   Ruth  
(back) Subject: Chiff From: rnickel@itol.com Date: Wed, 6 May 1998 07:39:12 -0500 (CDT)   I'll admit ... I haven't been reading a lot of the posts lately, but I did read some of today's (last night's) with the chiff comments.   I remember way back (well, I'm not *that* old) in high school when I played a Wicks at our Catholic church. After one Sunday morning, my mom said, "Isn't there something you can do to make the organ stop making that 'noise' when the pipes sound?" LOL The Wicks there (2m/13r) had great chiff.   On the other hand, my wife (who previously knew nothing about organs and now knows a little more than I do thanks to "hanging out" with me) will occasionally make the comment at a recital, "Nice chiff."   On the third hand (hmm), do any of you remember Allen organs with the Chiff stop? LOL I played one of those in h.s., too.   Bob Nickel (who plays a Jaeckel 2m/23r with very nice chiff)      
(back) Subject: Re: Chiff From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com> Date: Wed, 6 May 1998 08:04:55 -0500 (CDT)   I recall some years ago improving the shining hour with a coworker at a country church playing around on the old electronic while we waited for the pastor to arrive to show us over the old tracker organ in the church which we were to bid on restoring. We found there was one tab marked "C", and when you turned it on you got a gentle "ping". What could this be? Some kind of electronic harp/celesta? Finally we figured out that it was meant top be the electronic chiff function!   Thomas Hardy's novel *The Trumpet Major* begins by describing how the mill at Overbury operated making a sound like the Stopped Diapason on an old organ. Chiff once more.   Generally speaking those people are right who say that chiff is a defect of pipe speech. A pipe speaks too rapidly, and momentarily jumps up an octave before settling on the correct fundamental note. It and other transient effects such as "sizzle" can be corrected by various voicing techniques such as nicking the languids, reducing the wind flow, raising the languids and increasing the cut-ups of the pipes.   Within certain very carefully defined limits, however, a certain degree of articulation or a very small amount of chiff can be a desirable feature. This can especially be the case with certain flute stops. Some of the old baroque organbuilders of the past used nicking in most of their pipework, but very little in the flutes. Some of the best modern organbuilders imitate them. What is important is that the chiff should be very carefully controlled and even throughout a rank and should not be overdone.   In the 1960s people reacted against the wooliness of many organs of the early part of the century, where nicking, cut-ups, toe-control, etc. were taken to extremes. This led to an over-reaction in which people went mad about chiff and produced organs that did pretty much nothing else. Today people have reacted against that, and organs are now sensibly being produced with very little if any chiff. Where chiff is present it is treated in an artistic manner.   It is sometimes possible to remove the chiff from organs of the 1960s and 1970s by nicking the languids, etc. In some cases, however, the pipework of organs of this era was so badly made and scaled that when you do this there is nothing left!   John.    
(back) Subject: Re: Teenage Organists - My lecture (very long, sorry) From: KZimme7737 <KZimme7737@aol.com> Date: Wed, 6 May 1998 09:19:24 EDT   In response to Kevin's dilemma, let me offer some free advice/comfort/whatever from an about-to-be-over-the-hill man who's experienced similar situations. Please forgive the length of this epistle. Once I get started talking, I have trouble shutting up. I decided to post this to the list since Kevin's posting was general and there might be other young people who find themselves in similar situations. Unfortunately, most young people might be tired of lectures from parents and elders that this will go unread.   Kevin writes,   "Being a teenage organist, I think it compares to my situation. MY situation as a teenage organist places me in a "lower" position. Even though I am better than some older organists who have been at it longer, they still find it comforting to "put me in my place." "   Some people have a gift and love for teaching - others don't. Perhaps your organist likes to share his/her gift with others. I'm excited when I have a young medical student in my office. I enjoy teaching. He/she will be caring for other people some day, and I want them to learn to do it right. Other MDs just love to give students a hard time by ridiculing their innocent basic questions.   Unfortunately most professions seem to have a ladder one has to climb in order to be recognized. This rungs on this "ladder" do not necessarily equate with increasing skill in exercising the profession. There seem to be many undefined factors that come into play. This is called "doing your time". In my first note to Kevin, I whined that I was obsessed with the organ as a young boy. I leaned over the choir rail to observe the organist playing the postlude. But, since the organ was an adult instrument, I couldn't even touch it. It was padlocked at all times. By the time I was 10, I had had 3 years of piano; I could barely reach an octave; I could site read almost anything that would then be played in a church, but I only got to play the piano (for the kids choir) one time during the 9 years at that church. Since I was not a pupil of the organist or choir director, my gift was unused.   You will notice even the olympics is not judged only on raw ability, especially the subjective events such as ice dancing, skating, and gymnastics. This was evident two years ago. Many years ago M. Ito blew the tutu off Katerina Witt and the other girl in the ice skating in ability, jumps, etc. But the judges had to save their highest marks for the two that, it seemed, had been predetermined to receive the gold and silver.   In Medical School and Internship one thinks that the "higher-ups" would be encouraging us in our chosen profession. Most of the time we got criticism. Perfection seemed to be the minimum requirement. Occasionally, an older MD would give some very encouraging words. The general attitude was "we had to do our time, you have to do yours". Don't anyone try to change things.   Kevin is looking forward to college....   "I'm about sick of it all, and just keep saying to myself, "I'll be off to college soon and not have to put up with their crap." "   Kevin, there will always be crap - and it never goes uphill. Academia is very bad about hierarchy, too. My wife found this out in grad school. I'm sure there are exceptions. You will find that ability alone won't always get you the recognition you deserve. There will be those who will be allowed certain privileges and opportunities ahead of you even though you might be able to play circles around them. There's a lot of politics and "brown-nosing" that goes on. It's not fair, but it's the nature of the beast - it's life.   One last bit of personal advice from someone whose mouth has gotten him into trouble several times. I was a 19 year old young man playing the organ and directing the choir at a small church. I had grown up in large churches with great music programs. I KNEW what to do. I took advice from no one. I played MY kind of music. I didn't know much about managing people. When I came to Commerce, I was the only residency trained and board certified family physician in town. I practiced "modern" medicine. I criticized the care that a few of the older general practitionners delivered. I was correct in my assessment, but wrong in the way I handled the situations. Others loved and revered these GPs and took offense to some young upstart MD criticizing them.   Practice your organ, be eager to learn from your elders - you can even learn something from the experiences of those whose abilities have weakened with age. Keep a gentle spirit and quietly improve your abilities - both technical and artistic. You will be passed over occasionally for opportunities that you will be qualified for, but your abilities will win you the approval eventually. Sometimes our attitudes and speech will cause us to lose our audience (meaning those who are in positions of authority over us), and it's often difficult to win back their favor. I have had to learn this the hard way, in music, in my relationships with others, and in my profession.   That's all folks. It's free and worth every penny of it.   Keith  
(back) Subject: Re: 10 CDs From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Wed, 6 May 1998 09:30:15 -0400   Glenda, dontcha love those recordings with mistakes in them. You can sit around with friends listening to it and . . . "wait, wait, listen... here it comes, here it comes . . . oh, oh, THERE" hahahahaha, "ooooooooooooooooh, can't believe he did that!" It's almost as much fun as watching a TV western (without sound) while listening to opera! (gasp) Also, have recently discovered that it works almost as well with TV Evangelists and Opera! chortle!   bruce o h s __________ a g o cornely o o __________ o o ........... cremona84000@webtv.net ...........    
(back) Subject: Re: My First Recital From: tracker@j51.com (Ken and Chris Potter) Date: Wed, 6 May 1998 10:05:13 -0500   My first recital happened back during lent in 1983 or so. It was a noontime recital followed by soup lunch at Grace Church, Nyack, NY on their wonderful 34 rank Casavant. The unnerving thing was that after I was introduced and seated myself at the organ (weary and ill at ease) I heard something going on below. I turned and looked down from the balcony to see a small child going up the aisle holding onto the end of a rope. Soon another child appeared holding onto this rope - followed by another, and another etc. Eventually the whole length of the aisle was filled with children on this rope and finally an adult appeared holding the end. They all sat in the front and then I began the program. Talk about unnerving. Later I found out that it was the local Montessori school which used this method to keep the kids together as they took little trips around town. They were treated to the T & F in d, some Clerambault, the Francis Jackson Fanfare and a bunch o other pieces. The soup was great.   I couldn't decide what to play for a prelude next Sunday, so guess what? "Ich ruf zu dir" gets a playing. So this list is good for something.   Ken   ============================================================================ Kenneth G. Potter, Minister of Music St. Peter's Episcopal Church, Westchester Square 914/358-2528 2500 Westchester Avenue, Bronx, NY 10461 tracker@j51.com ============================================================================                  
(back) Subject: Re: Teenage Organists - My lecture (very long, sorry) From: "Kevin M. Simons" <Kevin.M.Simons-1@ou.edu> Date: Wed, 06 May 1998 08:51:29 -0500   KZimme7737 wrote: > > In response to Kevin's dilemma, let me offer some free advice/comfort/whatever > from an about-to-be-over-the-hill man who's experienced similar situations. > Please forgive the length of this epistle. Once I get started talking, I have > trouble shutting up. I decided to post this to the list since Kevin's posting > was general and there might be other young people who find themselves in > similar situations. Unfortunately, most young people might be tired of > lectures from parents and elders that this will go unread. >     Oh, I don't think so. Speaking as a young person (19), I have always found that I can learn a lot from other people's past experience. When I got to college, I thought that I too would be free of the hierarchy that was in my hometown as well as in Ann Arbor. What I found was that it was here, and to a greater degree (times ten!). I don't necessarily think that its a bad thing, just a fact of musical life. Within the music and organ world, there is always going to be someone who can play better and worse than you. The thing that you can do is bring your artistry to the instrument and piece, that is the unique thing. When I sing an aria, one that has been sung for hundreds of years, I know that I'm not going to sing it technically better than many of those singers. However, I will bring a different twist to that piece that may have never been brought before. The same can happen at the organ.   Don't get all wrapped up in competition with fellow area organists. There will be plenty of times where you're required to do that. Instead, look at what you can learn from them.   This'll be my last post to pipechat for the school year. Thank you all for your help and support through this transition year! I'll see you all in August.   Kevin M. Simons Organist, St. Thomas More Catholic Church Norman, Oklahoma  
(back) Subject: Re: Chiff From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Wed, 6 May 1998 10:08:34 -0400   The only time I enjoy chiff is when it can be controlled. I have a Bourdon on the Great which has unbelievably annoying chiff; I can't wait until the finishing is done in late summer! The organ is EP so the chiff is exactly the same every time the note plays. It's fun to plactice on a sensitive mechanical action which allows control (subtle as it is), to the point that it actually becomes a game for me. Granted, I do have difficult with chiffing celeste (which I also got one of!)   bruce o h s __________ a g o cornely o o __________ o o ........... cremona84000@webtv.net ...........    
(back) Subject: Re: Ten favorite recordings From: epeterso@madison.tdsnet.com (Dr Edward Peterson) Date: Wed, 06 May 1998 09:15:40 -0500   On Wed, 6 May 98 06:42:11 -0600, "gregory@mke.earthreach.com" <gregory@mke.earthreach.com> wrote:   >But...I did come across one outstanding recording recently titled: > >Saint-Saens/Frank/Widor >Die duos for Harmonium und Klavier >Signum SIG X87.00   Equally as exciting is the Karg-Elert, 'Die Duos f=FCr Harmonium und Klavier' featuring the same cast of characters. [Signum X77-00]   >The playing is wonderful. The harmonium is a two manual Mustel (Paris)=20 >in excellent tune and repair. The piano is a Kawaii which sounds fine. = =20 >The performers Johannes Mattias Michel, harmonium and Ernst Breidenbach,= =20 >Klavier, are great musicians and technicians. =20   And truer words were never written.   >If you come across this recording, get it! (I found my copy at the=20 >Exclusive)   I would agree! =20   Dr.Ed (who gets 'review copies' and doesn't have to hunt for them)  
(back) Subject: Re: Teenage Organists - My lecture From: Bill 6827 <Bill6827@aol.com> Date: Wed, 6 May 1998 10:18:02 EDT   Greetings all:   In response to Kevin's frustration, I too as a young teenager went through exactly that to which he makes reference. I basically was told that the organ was not a toy and I "might" break it. (Our organist never took a lesson and she rarely played the pedals). I knew that if I went on into a musical carreer, I would have an uphill battle for ever. So, I also went into the medical area and became a dentist. I also turned my musical career over to the Lord. And you know what, He will use anyone who is committed to Him. Of course, the studying goes on and on. Not only in medicine and dentistry but in the music fields as well. I have been playing the organ for over 50 years and I still have to work on technique. (I had a lesson last Thurs with Mary Preston who is the curator of the Meyerson Organ in Dallas) We all must remember that the day we think we know it all is when pride kicks in and we have a great fall. Stay Humble; bite that lip; don't say any retorts; you can catch a whole lot more flies with honey that you can with vinegar. And remember, IF IT DOES'T MATTER FIVE YEARS FROM NOW, IT DOES'N'T MATTER!!! (Incidently, I will be playing the Meyerson Organ in Dallas for the Baylor Dental School Graduation on June 7th. You see, being faithful in the small things and the Lord gives you some wonderful things down the line.)   William R. Hanson, DDS Bill6827@aol.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Teenage Organists - My lecture (very long, sorry) From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Wed, 6 May 1998 10:20:56 -0400   By the way, Keith, you posted your epistle at 9 in the morning. Is there some poor sick person sitting naked on your examining room table while you kick around with organists??? I always wondered what you guys were doing?   hehehe   bruce o h s __________ a g o cornely o o __________ o o ........... cremona84000@webtv.net ...........    
(back) Subject: Re: Teenage Organists - My lecture (very long, sorry) From: sohmer@juno.com (Stephen Ohmer) Date: Wed, 6 May 1998 09:53:11 -0400     On Wed, 6 May 1998 09:19:24 EDT KZimme7737 <KZimme7737@aol.com> writes: >In response to Kevin's dilemma, let me offer some free >advice/comfort/whatever >from an about-to-be-over-the-hill man who's experienced similar >snipsnipsnipsnipsnipsnipsnip... > >Practice your organ, be eager to learn from your elders - you can even >learn >something from the experiences of those whose abilities have weakened >with >age. >Keep a gentle spirit and quietly improve your abilities - both >technical and >artistic. You will be passed over occasionally for opportunities that >you >will be qualified for, but your abilities will win you the approval >eventually. Sometimes our attitudes and speech will cause us to lose >our >audience (meaning those who are in positions of authority over us), >and it's >often difficult to win back their favor. I have had to learn this the >hard >way, in music, in my relationships with others, and in my profession. > >That's all folks. It's free and worth every penny of it. > >Keith >   Keith has given everyone on the list words of wisdom, not just to the youngest of the young.... We all have been there, done that, when it comes to making our mistakes in our profession, whether it's church music or theatre (come on, guys/gals, which spelling is correct here?). It's really not unlike that far gone time when we were teen agers, rebelling against a system of some sort, that we couldn't see or even imagine.   snipsnipsnipsnip...... be eager to learn from your elders - you can even >learn >something from the experiences of those whose abilities have weakened >with >age.   >From my work in the Christian churches, I seem to recall one of the commandments - ten, I think, there were/are, which cover so many bases which Kevin has touched on: Honor your parents......... Honor those who are older than you, perhaps wiser than you, and who hold power and authority over you.... someday you will be in their position and want to be treated that way, and you, too, will want to share all the wisdom of your years.   Looking back, even the roughest of times were worth it for me to be where I am, what I am, and who I am, in my profession.   Steve Ohmer Charlottesville, VA   Now... get back to practicing and get off the computer for a few minutes.....   _____________________________________________________________________ You don't need to buy Internet access to use free Internet e-mail. Get completely free e-mail from Juno at http://www.juno.com Or call Juno at (800) 654-JUNO [654-5866]  
(back) Subject: Question on Gigout & his Toccata From: Vernon Moeller <vernonm@ccsi.com> Date: Wed, 06 May 1998 08:39:04 -0500   I'm playing Gigout's Toccata in B-minor this coming Sunday, Mother's Day, for offertory. If I was playing it for my Prelude or Postlude, I wouldn't be very nervous about it, but at the offertory, I have a captive (and quiet) audience, so they might really be listening!   Anyway, I was wondering if any of you had any good stories about Gigout or his Toccata.   TIA, \/\/\    
(back) Subject: Re: 10 CDs From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com> Date: Wed, 6 May 1998 12:51:50 -0500   > dontcha love those recordings with mistakes in them. You can sit > around with friends listening to it and . . . "wait, wait, listen... > here it comes, here it comes . . . oh, oh, THERE" hahahahaha, > "ooooooooooooooooh, can't believe he did that!" . . . .   I know you're just funning, Bruce, but on a serious note I don't agree - I actually heard a human organist, one that wasn't too good to be true. And the beauty of his playing made up for the mistakes.   This note was longer (with some drivel about the mind's idealizing the music one is actually hearing during a performance with that "spark", blah, blah) but I have just accomplished some self-censorship - snip, snip!   Glenda      
(back) Subject: Re: 10 CDs From: sohmer@juno.com (Stephen Ohmer) Date: Wed, 6 May 1998 14:19:11 -0400       I'm curious if we have in our profession a persona such as vocal music's Florence Foster Jenkins?   My friend Mark Dunn and I used to do such little funnies occasionally at organ class at TCU, and more often at our respective (hah!) churches when we'd listen to each other practice.   Surely we have someone like that, don't we. Ye gawds, I must think of incorporating such an event into my next concert.! The idea is now copyrighted and trademarked, no stealing ;-)     steve On Wed, 6 May 1998 12:51:50 -0500 "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com> writes: >> dontcha love those recordings with mistakes in them. You can sit >> around with friends listening to it and . . . "wait, wait, >listen... >> here it comes, here it comes . . . oh, oh, THERE" hahahahaha, >> "ooooooooooooooooh, can't believe he did that!" . . . . > >I know you're just funning, Bruce, but on a serious note I don't agree >- I >actually heard a human organist, one that wasn't too good to be true. >And >the beauty of his playing made up for the mistakes. > >This note was longer (with some drivel about the mind's idealizing the >music one is actually hearing during a performance with that "spark", >blah, >blah) but I have just accomplished some self-censorship - snip, snip! > >Glenda > > > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >   _____________________________________________________________________ You don't need to buy Internet access to use free Internet e-mail. Get completely free e-mail from Juno at http://www.juno.com Or call Juno at (800) 654-JUNO [654-5866]  
(back) Subject: Re: Chiff From: Prestant16 <Prestant16@aol.com> Date: Wed, 6 May 1998 16:32:50 EDT   In a message dated 98-05-06 09:09:29 EDT, you write:   << On the third hand (hmm), do any of you remember Allen organs with the Chiff stop? LOL I played one of those in h.s., too. >>   That reminds me of a story I heard from organbuilder, Bob Roche.   There was an organ he built, I think it is a 2 manual, anyway a friend of his went to the dedication recital with him and noticed how the diapason chiffed. Later, he went to see the organ, tried the diapason and it did not chiff at all. Bob pulled out the Great 4' Flute (I'm not sure what kind it was, but it chiffed like crazy) and it sounded like there was a chiffy diapason in the great. Bob said ".... and like on the Allen organs this is MY chiff on/off!"   -William C.  
(back) Subject: Bach Little Prelude And Fugue In C Major ( a little long) From: Beau Surratt <beaupiano@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 05 May 1998 21:22:56 -0500   Hi! I learned the Bach Little Prelude And Fugue In C Major a while back (my first organ piece), and decided to play it in my piano/organ teacher's piano recital instead of playing another piano piece. I have a few questions regarding interpretation. 1.) What is a good tempo for this piece (M.M.) 2.) Early in the piece, in the pedal part, there are 4 note repeated eighth note patterns (dddd,gggg). My organ teacher says that I should pay the notes detached, but CONNECT the last note of one group to the first note in the next. I disagree, and so does Harold Gleason (method of organ playing). What do y'all think. If he IS wrong, what should I tell him?)   Also, do any of you happen to know of any other "method" type books that might be of use to me? I am an intermediate organist. I have looked at the Flor Peeters "Little Organ Book", but it is for beginning organists, and I don't know if it would be of any use to me. What do you think? Any help would be appreciated. Oh, by the way, I decided to play the "Ich Ruf Zu Dir" on Trinity Sunday.   Beau Beau Surratt beaupiano@earthlink.net Organist, Bemis United Methodist Church Student, South Side High School    
(back) Subject: Re: Teenage Organists - My lecture (very long, sorry) From: usd465@horizon.hit.net (Frank Johnson) Date: Wed, 6 May 1998 16:26:10 -0500   Kevin I hope you have a great summer. Are you staying in Ok City to play at the church or going home? At any rate. Have wonderful summer.   Frank   Frank R. Johnson (KA0API) Spirit of New Orleans - clarinet/leader http://www.hit.net/~usd465/ 1922 E. 14th Winfield, KS 67156