PipeChat Digest #363 - Thursday, May 7, 1998
 
Re: The Silence of the Typing Hands.
  by "Kevin Cartwright" <kevin1@alaweb.com>
Re: Question on Gigout & his Toccata
  by "Marciac10" <Marciac10@aol.com>
Re: The Silence of the Typing Hands.
  by "bruce cornely" <cremona84000@webtv.net>
Re: Teenage Organists - My lecture (now very short)
  by "Vox Celeste" <voxceleste@mailexcite.com>
Re: Question on Gigout & his Toccata
  by "bruce cornely" <cremona84000@webtv.net>
Re: Accenting on the Organ
  by "Vernon Moeller" <vernonm@ccsi.com>
New position
  by "Myosotis51" <Myosotis51@aol.com>
Re: Florence Foster Jenkins
  by "Jacob Nelson" <nelsonje@plu.edu>
Florence Foster Bandwidth
  by <mewzishn@spec.net>
Bach's Little P&F
  by <rnickel@itol.com>
Re: R. Duerr, Organ Recital, Cadet Chapel, West Point, NY - 10  May
  by "Orlando Fiol" <fiol@bway.net>
Re: Question on Gigout & his Toccata
  by "Marciac10" <Marciac10@aol.com>
Re: Going With the System
  by "FireAlarmz" <FireAlarmz@aol.com>
Re: New position
  by "FireAlarmz" <FireAlarmz@aol.com>
Re: New position
  by "bruce cornely" <cremona84000@webtv.net>
Re: New position
  by "Bonnie Beth Derby" <orge@dreamscape.com>
Detaching Bach
  by "Sean Haley" <newgershwin@hotmail.com>
Re: Bach Little Prelude And Fugue In C Major ( a little long)
  by "SCoonrod" <SCoonrod@aol.com>
Re: Bach Little Prelude And Fugue In C Major ( a littl
  by "SCoonrod" <SCoonrod@aol.com>
The Contemporary American Organ
  by "Beau Surratt" <beaupiano@earthlink.net>
Re: The Contemporary American Organ
  by "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com>
Re: New position
  by "Picander" <Picander@aol.com>
Re: New position
  by "G Sandlawn" <GSandlawn@aol.com>
Re: Teenage Organists and "emotional adjusting"
  by "Shirley" <pnst@itw.com>
Re: New position
  by "bruce cornely" <cremona84000@webtv.net>
Re: Teenage Organists and "emotional adjusting"
  by "Bob Conway" <conwayb@post.queensu.ca>
Re: Question on Gigout & his Toccata
  by "Shirley" <pnst@itw.com>
Method to teach youngster
  by "Shirley" <pnst@itw.com>
Re: New position
  by "CoppBob" <CoppBob@aol.com>
 


(back) Subject: Re: The Silence of the Typing Hands. From: Kevin Cartwright <kevin1@alaweb.com> Date: Wed, 06 May 1998 21:57:29 -0500   bruce cornely wrote: > > Some use talents for EVIL! > Whatever do I mean?? > > You're only guilty if you think you are! I am SOOOOOO excited about > being renovated! ...as long as it doesn't include aluminum siding!   Well, I cant resist...I HAVE to say something. At "some use talents for EVIL!", I incriminatingly grin to myself, then laugh. I'll watch what my mouth (or should I say hands) say from now on.   Also, about the dog "pee" on the cornerstone, well, leave OUR church unlit at night, and we come back with cocaine spills on the terrace... And it's an upper-middle class neighborhood!!   Anyway,   Kevin C. kevin1@alaweb.com      
(back) Subject: Re: Question on Gigout & his Toccata From: Marciac10 <Marciac10@aol.com> Date: Thu, 7 May 1998 08:45:57 EDT   I'm playing the Gigout Toccata for my organ jury on Wed. I also played it for an offertory a couple of weeks ago on the small electronic organ at my church. I play for all three morning services and had a different page turner for each service. The first turner turned two pages the first time and didn't realize it. So I warned the second turner to be careful. Lo and behold, she turned two pages the first time, too. At least she realized it and fixed it quickly, unlike the first service!! Thank goodness the last turner did a great job. For my jury, I'll have a fellow organ student turning, so it should go well. I'll also be on a three manual pipe organ, so I can do all the registrations, etc that I couldn't do on the little Baldwin! Marcia Colonius  
(back) Subject: Re: The Silence of the Typing Hands. From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Thu, 7 May 1998 09:44:38 -0400   Ah Kevin, You have learned that there is a time and a place for everything, and the wry "cybergrin" tells me that "thou knowest when and how to be wonderfully EVIL L L L L". You're learning fast! Your church must be in an upper-middle class neighborhood. POOR people certainly could not afford to spill cocaine. Hmmm. I wonder how they would react to a mixture of cocaine and dog-pee??   bruce o h s __________ a g o cornely o o __________ o o ........... cremona84000@webtv.net ...........    
(back) Subject: Re: Teenage Organists - My lecture (now very short) From: "Vox Celeste" <voxceleste@mailexcite.com> Date: Thu, 07 May 1998 07:05:07 -0700   "It is the malady of our age that the young are so busy teaching us that they have no time left to learn."   - Eric Hoffer (1902-1983)     I am so glad that Mr. Hoffer remembered that because I taught him that when I was very young.   Vox Celeste       Free web-based email, Forever, From anywhere! http://www.mailexcite.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Question on Gigout & his Toccata From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Thu, 7 May 1998 10:07:15 -0400   Oh, Marcia; you bring back such memories (mem'ries, da da daaaaaaaa da da da etc). The first is a jury memory. I was playing the Franck E-major chorale. Fortunately (?) we did not need page turners because juries were played from memory (youuuuuuuu bet!). I had some difficult in one section and it set off a chain of blubs which had to be exorcised with an incantation of four letter words. After I got that out of my system, the remainder of the Franck, as well as the Prelude & Fugue in g-minor (Bach) went well. At lunch time in the Student Union cafeteria I was approached by one of my jurists who said, "Bruce, I really enjoyed your playing this morning." My response, "You've got to be kidding." "Ah," he said, "the Franck got off to a rough start, but after that little 'prayer' you did just fine!" Thought I would die right there on the spot. The other time was an Easter service in a Methodist Church which was being broadcast on the radio. The prelude was the Fanfare for Organ by John Cook which started at 11, so that it would be included in the broadcast. My sweet little page turner tore the next to last page out of the binding AND dropped it onto the pedal board, so that I was not only playing from memory but also doing octave pedal jumps with both feet on a pedal board with a sheet of paper shifting freely about. >I haven't used a page turner since!! (that was >in '71)   bruce o h s __________ a g o cornely o o __________ o o ........... cremona84000@webtv.net ...........    
(back) Subject: Re: Accenting on the Organ From: Vernon Moeller <vernonm@ccsi.com> Date: Thu, 07 May 1998 09:53:39 -0500   Keith said: >Pardon the silly question, but I've never had organ lessons.   There's no such thing as a silly question, in my book, if you really don't know something.   Unless it's asked by one of those impertinent teenage organists... (chortle! chortle! teehee! - not really!)   >How do you accent on the organ? Do you hold the note a fraction of a second >longer than usual?   The way I understand it, accented notes come in two categories: (1) those preceded by other notes, and (2) those which are not preceded by other notes (no duh, Sherlock!).   If you wish to accent a note from category 1, above, simply halve the preceding note and insert a rest of equal value before the note to be accented. When playing, make sure that the audience can hear the inserted rest. So, a quarter note followed by an accented half note is played: eighth note, eighth rest, half note. Make sure the rest is played - even tiny moments of silence bring out the importance of the notes that follow.   I have a similar problem in the Gigout Toccata, which has several instances of low B-high B octaves in the pedals, where the first note is an eighth, and the second one is a dotted quarter or longer. In order to avoid a mushy sound, like Marie-Claire Alain gets on her recording made at L'Eglise St-Sulpice in Paris, you have to insert a brief rest between the B's (I use a 16th rest). Also in this case, since the octaves are repeated several times, I have to shorten the longer note just a bit so the audience can hear the shorter one when it comes in.   To confound my problem, I noticed that the organ I practice on and play on for church, a 2-yr-old Allen MDS-60, is more forgiving of careless pedal technique because you don't have to press the pedal very far down before the combined pedal stops sound simultaneously, while the organ I get lessons on (a 20-yr-old (?) Hofmann PO) demands that I punch the pedals and make a really big deal out of playing accents on them. Guess which one my teacher says is preferable (sigh!).   In the second category, the one without preceding notes, I accent notes by using a strong attack. Registration helps, too. Because of the audience's ability to immediately compare accented and unaccented notes, the first category is easier to bring off, IMHO.   Hope this helps somebody.   \/\/\    
(back) Subject: New position From: Myosotis51 <Myosotis51@aol.com> Date: Thu, 7 May 1998 11:37:05 EDT   Hi all!   Wanted to share my news with you.   Last night, after much consideration, I accepted the position of Organist at the Center Moriches, NY UMC.   I had an organist position some time ago, which I lost due to church politics, and I've been very happy subbing for various churches for several years. It's been enough to keep me busy, but not so much as to constitute actual *work*. I'm also mom of two teenage daughters, and I have other work commitments - I'm manager of an office for about 30 hours/week, and I do a lot of volunteer work. AND I have been working on a possible piano recital, comprised of Mozart's Sonata in A and misc. keyboard works by Handel.   I've subbed for this church many times, and this was the fourth time in the past two years they offered me the job. They understand that I'm somewhat unwilling to commit myself, and they sweetened the deal beyond my ability to resist temptation. This church is only about 15 minutes from my house, and the people are great, especially the director of music. He has a terrific sense of humor, and I won't have to deal with the church board directly - he'll do that for me. The choir has some strong voices (at least one on each part), and they sing much of the service..... so my main job will be accompanying them.   I feel like I've just stepped off a cliff!   Vicki, now re-joining the ranks of the overemployed      
(back) Subject: Re: Florence Foster Jenkins From: Jacob Nelson <nelsonje@plu.edu> Date: Thu, 07 May 1998 09:14:48 -0700 (PDT)       On Wed, 6 May 1998, Peggy C. Bie wrote:   > Please inform me what this often mentioned "band width" is. We computer users > don't understand. I have an IBM, and all I worry about is having enough space > in my computer's memory.   Bandwidth is a term that describes the rate of information exchange. It's actually more applicable to something like a modem. For instance, the newest 56K modems have a receiving bandwidth of 56 kilobits per second.   Computer "geeks" (like me! :-) who started the Internet started using the term started using to describe other things, like this list. Most people can only handle so many messages per day (most people only *want* so many messages per day!). In the old days, the links between servers on the Internet were small, so there was a physical reason to worry about it. Now it's more of a personal preference thing.   Bandwidth is a good piece of Internet jargon. The more you use it, the more you'll sound like an Internet expert! ;-)   jake      
(back) Subject: Florence Foster Bandwidth From: mewzishn@spec.net Date: Thu, 07 May 1998 12:50:16 -0400   "Bandwidth" is the amount of data transfered over the internet. If one weighs in long and loud about a topic, generating a resultant (keeping us loosely on topic) file of substantial size, one is said to have used more bandwidth than if one keeps one's remarks to one or three or 5-1/3 (just in case you forgot that this actually is an organ list) lines. Thus is the spinet version of what "bandwidth" is.   Next, I learn how to use good English.   Ken Sybesma        
(back) Subject: Bach's Little P&F From: rnickel@itol.com Date: Thu, 7 May 1998 11:54:18 -0500 (CDT)   Oh, my God ... asking a question like tempo and articulation means *everyone* will now give his or her view on what is correct. Ugh.      
(back) Subject: Re: R. Duerr, Organ Recital, Cadet Chapel, West Point, NY - 10 May From: Orlando Fiol <fiol@bway.net> Date: Thu, 07 May 1998 13:04:22 -0500   As someone who speaks six languages, I know the pleasure of being able to communicate with people who don't speak Engglish and reading poetry and literature in the original. However, my pleasure in being able to communicate prompts me to remember that titles of pieces are meant to communicate an image or an idea to listeners. In most cases, it was assumed that the listeners could understand the language of the title, since titles for compositions from the seventeenth century to the present have tended to be written in the vernacular. so, on one hand, I encourage people to learn a bunch of languages to broaden their horizons, but also encourage folks who can translate titles to do so for those people who would rather stick to English and not miss out. I think we can coexist rather peacefully if both the original and the translation of a title were included on programs.   Orlando    
(back) Subject: Re: Question on Gigout & his Toccata From: Marciac10 <Marciac10@aol.com> Date: Thu, 7 May 1998 14:06:09 EDT   Bruce, I enjoyed your memories!! I feel fortunate that I don't have to play my jury from memory. I did that, in piano, back in the late '70's. Don't think I could memorize now, like I did back then! As to page turners: the best one so far at my church is my 11 year old son! He didn't turn for me that Sunday (with the Gigout), but turned the next Sunday for the Gloria from Vivaldi's Gloria. He was at the rehearsal, so I got him to turn then. The first time through, he got lost, but turned when I told him. The second time, he was keeping up very well with the music, and the third time, he began turning too soon! He loved following the music, and once he learned how to turn for me, (be ready to turn but wait till I nod), he did great! I'm going to train my soon to be 10 year old daughter next, and I'll have good page turners for the next seven years. Marcia  
(back) Subject: Re: Going With the System From: FireAlarmz <FireAlarmz@aol.com> Date: Thu, 7 May 1998 16:53:23 EDT   << because I played the music the way *I* thought it should be played, instead of going with the system. At my age, this lesson should have >>   Don't sell yourself short, Steve. Music is first of all self-expression and communication, is it not?   I have heard a *great* church/concert organist violate nearly *all* the rules of hymn playing--including stuffing celestes in the registration, "naughty" chords, etc. etc. It worked- supremely! I wonder if an 'average'-type musician could get a CAGO doing that!!   I say- don't let exam results be the barometer of one's musical worth.   Peace, Bill Miller  
(back) Subject: Re: New position From: FireAlarmz <FireAlarmz@aol.com> Date: Thu, 7 May 1998 17:03:05 EDT   << I feel like I've just stepped off a cliff! Vicki, now re-joining the ranks of the overemployed >>     Vicki, congrats on your new church job!! We all (lurkers AND posters) wish you much success in what sounds like a *great* position!   Peace, Bill Miller  
(back) Subject: Re: New position From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Thu, 7 May 1998 17:26:41 -0400   congratulations. talkatchalatah!   bruce o h s __________ a g o cornely o o __________ o o ........... cremona84000@webtv.net ...........    
(back) Subject: Re: New position From: "Bonnie Beth Derby" <orge@dreamscape.com> Date: Thu, 7 May 1998 18:42:01 -0400   Vicki,   Congrats on the job. Now you can put the churck politics aside and enjoy playing! It is a wonderful experience!   Regards,   Bonnie Beth Derby orge@dreamscape.com   ---------- > From: Myosotis51 <Myosotis51@aol.com> > To: Myosotis51@aol.com > Subject: New position > Date: Thursday, May 07, 1998 11:37 AM > > Hi all! > > Wanted to share my news with you. > > Last night, after much consideration, I accepted the position of Organist at > the Center Moriches, NY UMC. > > I had an organist position some time ago, which I lost due to church politics, > and I've been very happy subbing for various churches for several years. It's > been enough to keep me busy, but not so much as to constitute actual *work*. > I'm also mom of two teenage daughters, and I have other work commitments - I'm > manager of an office for about 30 hours/week, and I do a lot of volunteer > work. AND I have been working on a possible piano recital, comprised of > Mozart's Sonata in A and misc. keyboard works by Handel. > > I've subbed for this church many times, and this was the fourth time in the > past two years they offered me the job. They understand that I'm somewhat > unwilling to commit myself, and they sweetened the deal beyond my ability to > resist temptation. This church is only about 15 minutes from my house, and > the people are great, especially the director of music. He has a terrific > sense of humor, and I won't have to deal with the church board directly - > he'll do that for me. The choir has some strong voices (at least one on each > part), and they sing much of the service..... so my main job will be > accompanying them. > > I feel like I've just stepped off a cliff! > > Vicki, now re-joining the ranks of the overemployed > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: Detaching Bach From: "Sean Haley" <newgershwin@hotmail.com> Date: Thu, 07 May 1998 15:43:58 PDT   I know everyone has heard enough on this one already, but I just can't resist putting in my nickel's worth. All those that said to detach the 8th notes are very correct. This year I have done a very in depth study on the structure and articulations of Bach and his contemporaries (namely Telemann). Typically speaking 8th notes are semi detached (not staccato), where as an 8th note followed by 16ths would be connected (unless otherwise noted). My piano teacher had me think of how a string player would play the notes (short bow strokes as compared to long legato bow strokes). Most judges that I have worked with like this aproach and think it is very appropriate. That's all for now.   _____ | | Sean M. Haley / NWOrganer | | Organist,Pianist,Composer,Piano Tech. () ()......................................() () .............................................| | .............................................|___|     ______________________________________________________ Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Bach Little Prelude And Fugue In C Major ( a little long) From: SCoonrod <SCoonrod@aol.com> Date: Thu, 7 May 1998 18:58:22 EDT   Beau,   David N. Johnson has an excellent method book for beginners. Sandra Souderland (sp ??) has a good method for playing early music full of examples.....   RandyT  
(back) Subject: Re: Bach Little Prelude And Fugue In C Major ( a littl From: SCoonrod <SCoonrod@aol.com> Date: Thu, 7 May 1998 19:02:58 EDT   In a message dated 98-05-06 23:57:00 EDT, JEKroep@hrn.bradley.edu writes:   << When I learned Bach's(?) Little Prelude and Fugue in C, my teacher taught to detach. However, Also the first note of the repeated series should be ever so slightly accented, or the organist should hesitate a bit. This produces a very fine result. >>   A good rule of thumb would be to make a slight lift between note groupings. especially at strong beats as here, this will help achieve the accent on the strong beats.  
(back) Subject: The Contemporary American Organ From: Beau Surratt <beaupiano@earthlink.net> Date: Thu, 07 May 1998 18:23:53 -0500   Hi! Do you happen to know where I could obtain a copy of the book called "The Contemporary American Organ". If there is a website or address, or phone number you could give me, or you have a used copy I could purchase, I would really appreciate it, otherwise just give me the name of the publisher.   Thanks, Beau Beau Surratt beaupiano@earthlink.net Organist, Bemis United Methodist Church Student, South Side High School    
(back) Subject: Re: The Contemporary American Organ From: David Scribner <david@blackiris.com> Date: Thu, 7 May 1998 19:06:36 -0500   >Hi! > Do you happen to know where I could obtain a copy of the book >called "The >Contemporary American Organ". If there is a website or address, or phone >number you could give me, or you have a used copy I could purchase, I would >really appreciate it, otherwise just give me the name of the publisher. > Beau   Check with the Organ Historical Society http://www.organsociety.org I think that they carry a reprint of the 8th Edition.   David      
(back) Subject: Re: New position From: Picander <Picander@aol.com> Date: Thu, 7 May 1998 20:49:57 EDT   In a message dated 98-05-07 12:29:39 EDT, Myosotis51@aol.com writes:   > I've subbed for this church many times, and this was the fourth time in the > past two years they offered me the job. They understand that I'm somewhat > unwilling to commit myself, and they sweetened the deal beyond my ability to >   Hm, sounds like you've been doing a great job there rather than a crappy job. Anyway congratulations :)   Brent Peterson Organist & Director of Music First Congregational Church Tempe, Arizona  
(back) Subject: Re: New position From: G Sandlawn <GSandlawn@aol.com> Date: Thu, 7 May 1998 22:09:16 EDT   Guess I will de-lurk enough to talk about my new position. After twenty-five years of touring with B'dway shows and living out of a suitcase, returned to my home town to find a dream position. A small church with a fine liturgical program, the best music with a 22 voice choir, that can handle anything (including Taverner), a small 2/15 tracker organ.... and there are two of us to split the organ and choirmaster duties... also a third person to handle the children's choir. There! So there are still good positions available to those who wait and hope.   Sand Lawn  
(back) Subject: Re: Teenage Organists and "emotional adjusting" From: Shirley <pnst@itw.com> Date: Thu, 07 May 1998 21:08:10   At 08:01 05/06/98 -0400, Ruth wrote: > >As long as you are not a teenager "who plays better" with an attitude,   I had my first organist/choir director position at 17, all to myself. I did find in my career, looking back on it some 30 years later, that some adults seemed threatened by me. Not being conceited here, but I wonder if my playing was better than theirs, or if they were jealous of the attention I got because I was young.   Believe me, kiddos, youth wears off. Sooner or later, you have to stand solely on talent and training. Have a goal and never lose sight of it.   --Shirley    
(back) Subject: Re: New position From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Thu, 7 May 1998 22:28:18 -0400   Congratulations on your new spot! Can we talk you out of specs of your 2/15 tractor!   bruce o h s __________ a g o cornely o o __________ o o ........... cremona84000@webtv.net ...........    
(back) Subject: Re: Teenage Organists and "emotional adjusting" From: Bob Conway <conwayb@post.queensu.ca> Date: Thu, 07 May 1998 22:40:16 -0400   At 09:08 PM 5/7/98, you wrote:   > >Believe me, kiddos, youth wears off. Sooner or later, you have to stand >solely on talent and training. Have a goal and never lose sight of it. > > --Shirley   The physical youth wears off, - but one's natural "youthfulness" need never wear off. You are as young as you feel, and at an even more elevated age than Shirley, - I can only say "Go for it!"   Anny Domino is a hard lady to beat, but you can keep her at bay with a young outlook and experienced thinking!   What was it that Virgil used to say? "The world belongs to the Young" - or something along those lines!   Good luck to you all, Bob Conway <conwayb@post.queensu.ca> http://www.greenford.demon.co.uk/bob/   Classics Director CFRC-FM 101.9 MHz Radio Queen's University Kingston, Ontario, K7L 3N6 CANADA        
(back) Subject: Re: Question on Gigout & his Toccata From: Shirley <pnst@itw.com> Date: Thu, 07 May 1998 21:23:41   At 08:45 05/07/98 EDT, you wrote:   > For my jury, I'll have a fellow organ student turning, so it should go >well.   Marcia, it's always a wise idea to practice it once with the page turner. That way, the turner can see if there are repeated sections, loose pages, etc., and you get the extra security of knowing the turner's style. Just a thought.   --Shirley  
(back) Subject: Method to teach youngster From: Shirley <pnst@itw.com> Date: Thu, 07 May 1998 21:56:29   Hi, folks--   I noticed the other Sunday, once again, a young man about 11 years old watching Glenn play the postlude. He comes up every week to watch. After Glenn slid off the bench, this young man slid on, and just fooled around on soundless manuals and pedals. This particular day, his younger sister, about 9, was watching and patiently waiting her turn.   Remembering the threads both here and on piporg-l about the future of the church organ, I decided to ask the dad of these youngsters if he would like me to give them organ lessons. They already both play piano, and the boy is also very good on violin. They're thinking about it at this point.   However, I want to find a church-organ method that isn't dry, that is appropriate for a child of this age and will keep them interested.   Ideas?   TIA.   --Shirley  
(back) Subject: Re: New position From: CoppBob <CoppBob@aol.com> Date: Thu, 7 May 1998 23:57:14 EDT   Dear Sand -- So nice to know that you're happy, and to realize how lucky your congregation is to have you! Been busy, and off soon to Misssissippi for high school graduation of our grandson. Peace! Bob Ann Arbor 23:55 EDT Thu 7 May 98