PipeChat Digest #366 - Saturday, May 9, 1998
 
Re: Page Turning - was Gigout's Toccata
  by "RSiegel920" <RSiegel920@aol.com>
Re: Bruce the hypocrite- NOT!
  by "bruce cornely" <cremona84000@webtv.net>
Hey teech- I'm thirty-five now, can I try the organ once?
  by "Ruth" <theraven@istar.ca>
Re: "Wedding Song"
  by "bruce cornely" <cremona84000@webtv.net>
Re: Pump Organ
  by "Paul Opel" <popel@sover.net>
Re :New Position
  by "gregory@mke.earthreach.com" <gregory@mke.earthreach.com>
Re: Hey teech- I'm thirty-five now, can I try the organ once?
  by "Stephen Ohmer" <sohmer@juno.com>
Speaking of organ training...
  by "Shakehip" <Shakehip@aol.com>
Re: "Wedding Song"
  by "Karl E. Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersv.edu>
Speaking of organ training...
  by "Judy A. Ollikkala" <71431.2534@compuserve.com>
Re: "Wedding Song"
  by "KZimme7737" <KZimme7737@aol.com>
Re: "Wedding Song"
  by "ScottFop" <ScottFop@aol.com>
Re: Wedding Song
  by "Trackerbkr" <Trackerbkr@aol.com>
Re: "Wedding Song"
  by "Stanley Lowkis" <nstarfil@mediaone.net>
Re: Page Turning - was Gigout's Toccata
  by "Ben Baldus" <bbaldus@voyager.net>
Re: People singing who either cannot or cannot any longer sing
  by "KZimme7737" <KZimme7737@aol.com>
RE: "Wedding Song"
  by "SM Fitzgerald" <orgel@shianet.org>
Re: "Wedding Song"
  by "bruce cornely" <cremona84000@webtv.net>
Re: "Wedding Song"
  by "FireAlarmz" <FireAlarmz@aol.com>
Re: Wedding Song
  by <mewzishn@spec.net>
Re: "Wedding Song"
  by "bruce cornely" <cremona84000@webtv.net>
Re: Hey teech- I'm thirty-five now, can I try the organ once?
  by "Sean Haley" <newgershwin@hotmail.com>
Re: Speaking of organ training...
  by "W. J. Morton" <wjm@pacbell.net>
Re: People singing who either cannot or cannot any longer sing
  by "Ruth" <theraven@istar.ca>
"Wedding Song"
  by "Ruth" <theraven@istar.ca>
 


(back) Subject: Re: Page Turning - was Gigout's Toccata From: RSiegel920 <RSiegel920@aol.com> Date: Sat, 9 May 1998 05:41:51 EDT   Where do you get the Gamble hinged tape? I thought that portion of their business went out of business? thanks in advance for the infor. R. Siegel  
(back) Subject: Re: Bruce the hypocrite- NOT! From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Sat, 9 May 1998 08:20:15 -0400   That's one of the problems. There is not much in the south that is "old" and redundant, and there are even fewer historic organs, unless they have been moved in. It's much easier to get a sunlamp and play inside!   bruce o h s __________ a g o cornely o o __________ o o ........... cremona84000@webtv.net ...........    
(back) Subject: Hey teech- I'm thirty-five now, can I try the organ once? From: Ruth <theraven@istar.ca> Date: Sat, 9 May 1998 08:28:10 -0400     I have an Idea,   Maybe we should make it mandatory for Piano Students to first learn the Organ. :) Sweet Justice that would be.   Ruth,    
(back) Subject: Re: "Wedding Song" From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Sat, 9 May 1998 08:59:41 -0400   ....a decent arrangement of Paul Stookey's Wedding Song....   HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA   HA   bruce o h s __________ a g o cornely o o __________ o o ........... cremona84000@webtv.net ...........    
(back) Subject: Re: Pump Organ From: Paul Opel <popel@sover.net> Date: Sat, 9 May 1998 09:19:33 -0400   Hello, Ruth.   If the organ is an Estey (from Brattleboro, by the way) in good shape, you can have a lot of fun playing music on it. I'd suggest looking at some of the Franck and Vierne pieces for harmonium, as they are good literature and work very well. Most music for manuals only will work, after a fashion. The typical keyboard range is 5 octaves, FF-f''', and most are split b/c', with separate stop controls. Typically, there are two sets of reeds, either at 8' or with the bass at 8+4', although there are many variations. There are often octave couplers, at 4' from middle c' up and 16' down, or through compass at 4'. Often, there is a subbass 16' for 13 notes, C-c- and they sound great. Many of the stopknobs open little baffles over the reeds for volume rather than tone control.   My Estey has the following knobs, from the left:   Subbass (16', C-c) Melodia (8', FF-b) Dolce (same reeds as Melodia, but softer) Viola (4', FF-b) Forte I (opens a baffle) Vox Humana (fan tremolo) Forte II (opens another baffle) Vox Jubilante (a louder reed, draws the Diapason also) Diapason (8', c'-f''') Dulciana (same reeds as Diapason) Harmonique (supercoupler, FF-f'')   For me, it took a little to get used to the speech of a reed organ- the notes sort of wooze into speech, with no discernable attack- but I figured out that you just keep playing in tempo, and everything works out. If the bellows are in good shape, you don't have to pump very fast. It's best to pump in tempo, but in a slow pulse- once or twice a measure, for most things. (I could never convince the woman who played it in "Threepenny Opera" last year that she was pumping it about four times faster than she needed to- she called it "the Stairmaster"). Pump the bellows full before you start playing. Alternate feet, and push the pedals their full travel- it's farther than you might guess.   Have fun!   Paul   >Hello, >I am going to be playing on a Pump Organ for a Wedding in August. > >I have never in my life played a pump organ, and have never even >seen one. > >This is a late 19th centure Estey, >Made in Battleboro(?) Vermont. > >Supposedly it sounds beautiful. Any info, advice, help would be more >then welcome. > >Thanks muchly, >Ruth > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org     http://www.sover.net/~popel      
(back) Subject: Re :New Position From: "gregory@mke.earthreach.com" <gregory@mke.earthreach.com> Date: Sat, 9 May 98 08:55:39 -0600   Greetings:   A few words of advise regarding new organist, organist/choir director positions.   LISTEN! There will always be politics in any church position. One faction will always be challenging another. DON"T TAKE SIDES!   DON"T BE OFFENDED when you hear "So&so did it this way". This is common, especially amoung older members of a congregation.   MAKE CHANGES GRADUALLY. Most congregations have been around for years. Don't upset the applecart the first service you play.   CHECK THE PISTONS. This will give you an idea of the sound the congregation is used to hearing. Don't change them all at once.   DON"T BE OVERLY CRITICAL OF THE CHOIR DIRECTOR, CHOIR, OR MUSIC CHOSEN. What to you may be a real chestnut anthem, may be the favorite anthem of the choir & congregation.   Every church choir has the ageing angel, over-the-hill, soprano with a major 3d vibrato who wishes to sing The Palms, Holy City, etc. for special occasions. When she (he) volunteers, suggest she (he) speak to the pastor. In other words, don't make immediate waves, PASS THE BUCK! Ministers make much more $$$ than organists. They are also trained to deal with situations such as this.   WORK WITH THE PASTOR (this can be difficult). Remember, they move around frequently. Although you may strongly disagree with them, be careful and don't talk behind their backs.   I could go on, but these common sense suggestions will help, both YOUNG & OLD beginning in a new position. I have been in the same position for nearly 30 years and am the third organist/choir director in this position in over 110 years!   Have a great weekend.     Tom Gregory First Baptist Church (An American Baptist Congregation) Waukesha, WI USA    
(back) Subject: Re: Hey teech- I'm thirty-five now, can I try the organ once? From: sohmer@juno.com (Stephen Ohmer) Date: Sat, 9 May 1998 10:00:01 -0400     On Sat, 9 May 1998 08:28:10 -0400 Ruth <theraven@istar.ca> writes: > >I have an Idea, > >Maybe we should make it mandatory for Piano Students >to first learn the Organ. :) Sweet Justice that would be. > >Ruth,     Ooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooh, LISTERS! Is Ruth mean or what? From what childhood experience would she ever, EVER, come up with such a awe-full idea?   Let's hear some serious dialogue on this ;-), we could increase ago membership fourfold.   Why this idea is deservant of some sort of prize. Ruth, you are something else! Yes, lets nominate Ruth for the S & M prize of the century!!!!!! hear hear ;-)       Reminds me of the joke - I'll make it organistic to help its relevance here.... Did you hear about the sadistic organist and the masochistic organist who had a great relationship? The masochistic organist kept saying, "Beat me, beat me." The sadistic organist kept say, "No."   _____________________________________________________________________ You don't need to buy Internet access to use free Internet e-mail. Get completely free e-mail from Juno at http://www.juno.com Or call Juno at (800) 654-JUNO [654-5866]  
(back) Subject: Speaking of organ training... From: Shakehip <Shakehip@aol.com> Date: Sat, 9 May 1998 10:28:51 EDT   I was just wondering (as I always am...) if any of the major organ companies sponsor programs for the public schools (as well as Pipe Organ societies) (i.e. donate electronic organs, subsidize a teacher to come in once a week) It would seem to me that such a program would prove profitable as parents who's children are taking organ lessons, would be more likely to purchase organs from their company, and schools and churches with pipe organs remaining (but not in use) would be less likely to tear them down and more likely to maintain them if they were being used. It would also bring in that extra income for the new mahagony colored Mercedes many people on this list have been wanting to buy. If program like this aren't out, think we should start bugging folks to get them started... ? ? ? Another point, is that I'm aware that a few years ago, organ shops took up a half a page in the yellow pages, didn't they... and now there are only one or two where I live... Wouldn't it be advisable for these shops as well to offer a free group class once a week ? It wouldn't cost the shops much, would be a simple and free sales and advertising ploy, and would also motivate parents to buy the organs in that not only does the organ come with a half a year of free lessons, but a place to dump the kids as well for an hour of peace and quiet...   - - The ever entertaining and enterprising, Ed   Pipe Organ societies might also consider Sunday historical tours of their local area to Churches, schools, department stores (etc.) that still have working pipe organs. (As a person who's focus is the superior Hammond, I've been working on a list of Churches, bars and other places in the world that still have up and running and played C3s and B3s.... anyone welcome to submit.)  
(back) Subject: Re: "Wedding Song" From: "Karl E. Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersv.edu> Date: Sat, 9 May 1998 12:17:59 -0400 (EDT)     Given what heresy this song text implies, might you get the singer to sing something else? Cordially,   Karl E. Moyer Lancaster PA   On Sat, 9 May 1998, Shirley wrote:   > Hi, folks-- > > I vaguely remember someone on this list (I think) mentioning they had a > decent arrangement of Paul Stookey's "Wedding Song". I'm to play this for > a singer on Memorial Day weekend, and I really really don't want to subject > the congregation (or myself!) to the boring, repetitive accompaniment > that's on the sheet music. > > Ideas? > > TIA. > --Shirley > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >    
(back) Subject: Speaking of organ training... From: "Judy A. Ollikkala" <71431.2534@compuserve.com> Date: Sat, 9 May 1998 12:12:32 -0400   For general information regarding church and organ visits to promote the organ, I have been running organ crawls, usually two or three times a year for the past 12 years, in Worcester MA and around the southern New England area. My last Columbus Day Fall Crawl for the Worcester Chapter AGO attracted 147 people with three buses needed. These regularly have over 100 attending. The Eastern New York AGO Chapter visited Worcester on April 25 for a day, visiting four large instruments, a long trip for them. These crawls, which include a 20 minute demo. by an accomplished volunteer player, the singing of a hymn, lunch, morning and afternoon snacks, bus, brochure with stoplists, bios. and historical information, promote the pipe organ not only to the participants, but to the churches we visit, some of whom have a new and positive viewpoint of their organ's imporatance, and have taken steps to preserve it. Also I involved younger organists and students as demonstrators when possible, and the camaraderie and exchange of organ talk among organists, organbulders, and new acquaintances made on these crawls, is an important part of the day.  
(back) Subject: Re: "Wedding Song" From: KZimme7737 <KZimme7737@aol.com> Date: Sat, 9 May 1998 13:22:24 EDT   I like Bruce's response to the question of a decent arrangement.   Is that the one that goes, "He is now to be among you ,,,,,"? I hate that song. Maybe it's because it was so overused. I'm wondering if "Household of Faith" and a few others will be next.   Keith  
(back) Subject: Re: "Wedding Song" From: ScottFop <ScottFop@aol.com> Date: Sat, 9 May 1998 11:23:44 EDT   In a message dated 98-05-09 09:00:56 EDT, you write:   << ..a decent arrangement of Paul Stookey's Wedding Song.... HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAH AHAHAHAHAHAHAHA HA >>     Uh- there is no such thing. In my churches I have always instituted very strong wedding music policies that have been published into a comprehensive booklet (backed by worship committees and pastors, I might add). The Stookey "Wedding Song" is NOT nor will it EVER be ALLOWED! (world without end...Amen!)   Scott Foppiano  
(back) Subject: Re: Wedding Song From: Trackerbkr <Trackerbkr@aol.com> Date: Sat, 9 May 1998 13:28:35 EDT   I've had to play this piece more often than I care to tell, but since weddings, funerals, and bar/t mitzvahs were my ticket to Europe and other wonderful places, I'm not too traumatized. Here is one solution on getting through the piece:   Beginning: Give the soloist the opening pitch, then let the soloist begin the piece in recitative style, a capella. Come in with the tonic pitch in the pedal at a point mutually decided upon, perhaps at the point where the soloist leaves that interminable dominant 5th to arrive at the tonic.   The interludes are way too long, so I change the chords just one measure apart, rather than the written 4- or 8- bar same-chord passages.   The beauty of this is, if you are working with an intelligent, classically trained singer, they are in total sympathy with this, yet if you are working with a clueless singer who can't read music, they don't know that you have trashed half the piece. If you need to make it clear to the soloist when to come in after the shortened interludes, you can always cadence and pause in order to beckon the soloist in.   Laurie Ryan, AAGO trackerbkr@aol.com  
(back) Subject: Re: "Wedding Song" From: Stanley Lowkis <nstarfil@mediaone.net> Date: Sat, 09 May 1998 13:37:27 -0400   Karl E. Moyer wrote: > > Given what heresy this song text implies, might you get the singer to sing > something else? > Cordially, > > Karl E. Moyer > Lancaster PA       Use violence if necessary. 'Fantasia on Let's Spend the Night Together' sounds better on the organ anyway.   Helpfully yours, Stan  
(back) Subject: Re: Page Turning - was Gigout's Toccata From: Ben Baldus <bbaldus@voyager.net> Date: Sat, 09 May 1998 13:44:22 -0400   Greetings:   Gamble Music is still a division of Carl Fischer. Their resources are available by catalog. I believe that you can still buy binding tape and other stuff at Fischer's store on Wabash. (At least I did last August).   Ben Baldus    
(back) Subject: Re: People singing who either cannot or cannot any longer sing From: KZimme7737 <KZimme7737@aol.com> Date: Sat, 9 May 1998 14:02:50 EDT   List,   Mr Gregory stated:   "Every church choir has the ageing angel, over-the-hill, soprano with a major 3d vibrato who wishes to sing The Palms, Holy City, etc. for special occasions. When she (he) volunteers, suggest she (he) speak to the pastor. In other words, don't make immediate waves, PASS THE BUCK! Ministers make much more $$$ than organists. They are also trained to deal with situations such as this."   Sometimes, the congregation gets a kick out of certain of these people. We had an 86 year old lady who was great in her day, I hear. She came in flat on "O Holy Night". After a line she stops, looks at the pianist (who, like me, can't transpose) and said, "you're playing that in the wrong key". I think they finalIy got through it. Everyone felt for the pianist, but enjoyed the commotion. I knew of a soprano in a church I attended during Medical School who had a beautiful voice except she had a problem with hitting individual notes. She was young, though. I remember one peice that had a lot of up-n- down runs for her against the voices of the choir. She did the runs, but it didn't sound like she was hitting the "individual" notes correctly. It wasn't a matter of not having the range. People in this stuffy church were actually snickering! Apparently, the music director liked using her.   Without meaning to sound at all judgemental to other trained musicians who have standards that they hold themselves to, please let me give another perspective on that as well as an analogy.   I've noticed in the small town churches around me, that most church people like music, but can't appreciate how well the piece is, or is not, being played many times. I've had so many people tell me when I complain that I had not done a great job that "I'm probably the only one that noticed". Thay MAY be true.   It appears to be more important, in these congregations, WHO is doing the performing rather than HOW it is being performed (within reason). Not meaning to sound self-righteous,... if one can accept the idea that these people (in church, that is, not on the public stage) are giving to God a song or piece of music that they are "offering" - as opposed to "performing" - with whatever level of ability they have been endowed, it might make the listening a little easier to stomach. I cringe when certain individuals in my church do solos. I can't stand to listen to some - or watch the mannerisms or others. I ask, "don't they know how bad they sound?"   There may be some truth, then, to the possiblity that we, who are trained in music, are the major ones who are so bothered by these musical offerings. While young Joe Blow is killing my ears with his solo, others may remember the rough time ole Joe had growing up and the things he's gone through which, coupled with the words being sung, have sufficient meaning to them, that they hear through the missed notes, irregular rhythm, etc., and are "moved".   I liken it to my difficulty appreciating some 20th century organ music. To ME, much of it sounds awful, has no melody, is mostly dissonant, and sounds as if it's being played with boxing gloves and snow shoes on. It's not easy for me to see through the "noise" in order to appreciate the 'structure' of the piece, the 'mathematical formula' or 'progression' of the chords, or the great 'technical difficulty' of the piece that all of y'all - who are more sensitive to these things - can appreciate. I'll try (and ask you to, also) to consider this analogy next time I/you wonder "why did the director let this guy/gal sing?"   End of sermon, y'all may go in peace and return next week.   Keith  
(back) Subject: RE: "Wedding Song" From: "SM Fitzgerald" <orgel@shianet.org> Date: Sat, 9 May 1998 16:08:15 -0400   I guess I'm reacting to the degree of conviction with which you spoke. I am music director of a large liturgical church. I used Stookey's Wedding Song a lot in the late 70's and early 80's, then if faded into disuse. It is coming back. But I prefer to perform it on our grand piano, or on the guitar. Not on the organ. But I've made my own arrangements over the years too--leave out a verse, do a duo vocal arrangement, etc. My only difficulty with the piece is its length rather than its theology per se.   I have much more difficulty with the Wagner Wedding March, which, in performing about 30 to 40 weddings a year I might do once or twice a year because a bride insists (or her mother does), despite my attempts at dissuading her from having it.   I have much more difficulty with the wedding "industry" and the bad liturgy that is done in the name of giving the bride "her" day.   I myself am getting married in six weeks. I've hired a very good liturgically sensitive organist. And I'm not sure of the music yet. But I know it won't be Pachelbel's "Canon" or "Trumpet Voluntary". The Responsorial psalm might be Rory Cooney's "The Lord Is Kind" (Psalm 127). As to a song to sing during the unity candle, it won't be the "Wedding Song," because I don't trust anyone to perform it as well as I do!" ;-)   Scott Fitzgerald Owosso, Michigan www.shianet.org/~orgel     >-----Original Message----- >From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org]On Behalf Of >ScottFop >Sent: Saturday, May 09, 1998 11:24 AM >To: pipechat@pipechat.org >Subject: Re: "Wedding Song" > > >In a message dated 98-05-09 09:00:56 EDT, you write: > ><< ..a decent arrangement of Paul Stookey's Wedding Song.... > > >HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA HAHAHAHAHAH >AHAHAHAHAHAHAHA > > HA >> > > >Uh- there is no such thing. In my churches I have always instituted very >strong wedding music policies that have been published into a >comprehensive >booklet (backed by worship committees and pastors, I might add). >The Stookey >"Wedding Song" is NOT nor will it EVER be ALLOWED! >(world without end...Amen!) > >Scott Foppiano > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >    
(back) Subject: Re: "Wedding Song" From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Sat, 9 May 1998 16:53:25 -0400   Yes, the Wedding Song; ah memories....   we called it the "telegraph song" because of the lovely opening melody: G G G G G G G G G G G G G A G !!   The opening accompaniment was: c g e G c g e G etc. in 16th or 8th notes I think; I was at the U o Houston on a 60's Reuter with a wonderful Singend Gedeckt onthe Positiv with wunnerful (real) chiff. The soloist always asked merrily, "Oh, Bruce, please play it on the 'hooves'!"   bruce o h s __________ a g o cornely o o __________ o o ........... cremona84000@webtv.net ...........    
(back) Subject: Re: "Wedding Song" From: FireAlarmz <FireAlarmz@aol.com> Date: Sat, 9 May 1998 16:56:09 EDT   << Singend Gedeckt on the Positiv with wunnerful (real) chiff. >>   One of those "1960's asthmatic coughing flutes" that Ian Bell spoke about????   :-)   Bill Miller  
(back) Subject: Re: Wedding Song From: mewzishn@spec.net Date: Sat, 09 May 1998 17:09:47 -0400   If I can't accompany on a piano, I try to find the most guitar/harp like stop (if the organ has a harp, super! or even a MIDI'd harp! wonderful!) and use sustained strings along with it in the left hand. I'm similarly in favor of cutting those long held notes -- "there is LUHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHvvv, oh there is LUHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHvvvvv" -- and usually get the singer to agree. The less-trained the singer, though, the more likely they are to want to show off their lung power (that is, their LACK of lung power) -- "LUHHHHHHH (gasp) UHHHHHHHHvvv" -- yucko!   It also has to mooooooooooooooooove! Like, around MM=110 or so for the quarter note. I've tried to do it much, much faster (the better to get it overwith, if you catch my drift), but brides tend to frown on a French-toccata perpetual-motion treatment to the piece.   Ken Sybesma        
(back) Subject: Re: "Wedding Song" From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Sat, 9 May 1998 17:11:04 -0400   No, UHouston did not have an asthmatic coughing flute. This one had very healthy, distinct, metallic articulation, more like Peter O'Toole in an angry scene. very firm and deliberate!! Lotsacajones!   bruce o h s __________ a g o cornely o o __________ o o ........... cremona84000@webtv.net ...........    
(back) Subject: Re: Hey teech- I'm thirty-five now, can I try the organ once? From: "Sean Haley" <newgershwin@hotmail.com> Date: Sat, 09 May 1998 14:42:34 PDT       What a GREAT idea, I am all for implementing this one into music education. I just wish someone would have thought it up and put it into action when I first started taking piano. This might just be the thing to save the field of organs.   _____ | | Sean M. Haley / NWOrganer | | Organist,Pianist,Composer,Piano Tech. () ()......................................() () .............................................| | .............................................|___|     ______________________________________________________ Get Your Private, Free Email at http://www.hotmail.com  
(back) Subject: Re: Speaking of organ training... From: "W. J. Morton" <wjm@pacbell.net> Date: Sat, 09 May 1998 14:44:36 -0700   At 10:28 AM 5/9/98 -0400, you wrote: (As a person who's focus is the superior Hammond, I've >been working on a list of Churches, bars and other places   I hope that purely in the interests of research you will share the list of bars and others places with the rest of us . . . . .    
(back) Subject: Re: People singing who either cannot or cannot any longer sing From: Ruth <theraven@istar.ca> Date: Sat, 9 May 1998 17:46:52 -0400   Re: Keith's Posting: I think you hit the nail on the hea, Keith,   Maybe that's why it says in the bible: Make a joyful NOISE unto the Lord,   Ruth :)    
(back) Subject: "Wedding Song" From: Ruth <theraven@istar.ca> Date: Sat, 9 May 1998 17:54:15 -0400   From: SM Fitzgerald [orgel@shianet.org] I myself am getting married in six weeks. I've hired a very good liturgically sensitive organist.   Ruth's Reply,   Isnt a sensitive organist one who plays what the Bride (not the organist) wishes , and then plays it in a most beautiful and musical manner??   Ruth