PipeChat Digest #369 - Monday, May 11, 1998
 
Re: Bruce the hypocrite- NOT!- II
  by "MW ORGLBAU" <MWORGLBAU@aol.com>
Re: Guy Henderson and PIPORG-L
  by "Bob Conway" <conwayb@post.queensu.ca>
Internet Relay Chat tonight at 9.00 pm EDT
  by "Bob Conway" <conwayb@post.queensu.ca>
Re: Concert Announcement
  by "MW ORGLBAU" <MWORGLBAU@aol.com>
Re: Speaking of organ training...
  by "Myosotis51" <Myosotis51@aol.com>
Registration
  by "Rick Williams" <Rick@netlink.nlink.com>
Re: Registration
  by "bruce cornely" <cremona84000@webtv.net>
Vicki's Organ
  by "Shakehip" <Shakehip@aol.com>
Re: Speaking of organ training...
  by "Picander" <Picander@aol.com>
Wedding Potpourri
  by "Vernon Moeller" <vernonm@ccsi.com>
Re: Piano study poll - - was Wedding Potpourri
  by "GRS Co LVR" <GRSCoLVR@aol.com>
RE: Piano study vs. organ study
  by "Wildhirt, Richard" <Richard.Wildhirt@PSS.Boeing.com>
A Very Barton Day or Theatre Organ Lovers Field Day (Cross Posted)
  by "Jon C. Habermaas" <opus1100@theatreorgans.com>
R.I.P GEORGE WRIGHT!
  by "WILLSONR" <WILLSONR@aol.com>
The Legend--GEORGE WRIGHT--Thoughts--
  by <danbel@earthlink.net>
RE: Piano study vs. organ study
  by "SM Fitzgerald" <orgel@shianet.org>
Re: Vicki's Organ
  by "Jacob Nelson" <nelsonje@plu.edu>
We who started on the organ/Wedding Potpourri
  by "bruce cornely" <cremona84000@webtv.net>
Re: Piano study vs. organ study
  by "tom rishel" <trishel@hhs.net>
 


(back) Subject: Re: Bruce the hypocrite- NOT!- II From: MW ORGLBAU <MWORGLBAU@aol.com> Date: Mon, 11 May 1998 06:54:53 EDT   Dear Bruce, Bill and list,   "Bruce, *serious* now... is Guy Henderson really going off PIPORG-L??"   As of the last time that we spoke, yes!   "It would be a shame to lose him. What's going on, do you know? I couldn't tell if he was getting flak, maybe from private posts, or if maybe he had a drinking problem or some such."   I could go into great detail, but I don't think that this is my place. I can say that he has been extremely displease with the quality of the postings on Piporg-L, as well as people who he (and frankly I) do not hold much regard for, who's seeming soul purpose is to stand on their soapbox and tell the world how great and important they are. Gets to me sometimes as well.   Regarding Guy's drinking habits, no worse than mine ;-) Seriously, I don't think that you really have anything to worry about. He has an occassional drink or 2. We shared a couple of glasses of wine before a concert a couple of weeks ago, and a nightcap before going home; all in the span of 6 hours or so. Trust me, he does not make a habit of it.   "Would it help if you "talked" to him?"   Not really. I already have.     Michael R. Williamson Williamson-Warne & Associates Hollywood Ca.  
(back) Subject: Re: Guy Henderson and PIPORG-L From: Bob Conway <conwayb@post.queensu.ca> Date: Mon, 11 May 1998 07:19:54 -0400   At 06:54 AM 5/11/98 EDT, Michael R. Williamson wrote: >Dear Bruce, Bill and list, > > "Bruce, *serious* now... is Guy Henderson really going off PIPORG-L??" > > As of the last time that we spoke, yes!   Please!   Would some-one tell me why the retirement of Guy Henderson from another list has to be brought to PipeChat-L? It seems to me that this list is not the place for such a discussion.   Let's stick to matters organic.   Bob Conway <conwayb@post.queensu.ca> http://www.greenford.demon.co.uk/bob/   Classics Director CFRC-FM 101.9 MHz Radio Queen's University Kingston, Ontario, K7L 3N6 CANADA        
(back) Subject: Internet Relay Chat tonight at 9.00 pm EDT From: Bob Conway <conwayb@post.queensu.ca> Date: Mon, 11 May 1998 07:20:21 -0400   Once again!   Just to remind all our Pipechat-l members that we are on live this evening.   Come and join in the "chat" with the regulars and put in your "tuppence-worth".   Have a look in our Web page, http://www.pipechat.org if you are not too sure of what you do to join us. It is all explained how it works.   See you there, - any time after 9.00 EDT.         Bob Conway <conwayb@post.queensu.ca> http://www.greenford.demon.co.uk/bob/   Classics Director CFRC-FM 101.9 MHz Radio Queen's University Kingston, Ontario, K7L 3N6 CANADA        
(back) Subject: Re: Concert Announcement From: MW ORGLBAU <MWORGLBAU@aol.com> Date: Mon, 11 May 1998 07:34:52 EDT   Dear List members,   This Sunday May 17,1998 at 4:00 P.M., organist Jiyeon Kim will play a concert of works by Frank, Bach, Widor, Raynor Brown, Haydn, and Liszt at the Hollywood United Methodist Church, 6817 Franklin Ave. in Hollywood California. Suggested donation of $8.00. This will be the last of this years series, and the last public performance before the console is being re-done.     Michael R. Williamson Williamson-Warne & Associates Hollywood Ca.  
(back) Subject: Re: Speaking of organ training... From: Myosotis51 <Myosotis51@aol.com> Date: Mon, 11 May 1998 08:08:32 EDT   In a message dated 5/10/98 8:36:50 PM Eastern Daylight Time, Shakehip@aol.com writes:   << You need to check in the back for the model... most organs have a plate. If the thing has a lot of draw bars, only a few tabs here and there, and lot's of Jazz musicians are banging at the door offering to buy it... then its definitely a Hammond B3... >>   Going to have to check out the back. But yup, lots of draw bars and not too many tabs, alright........ but it's set up with the speakers contained in the cabinet, which is carved and "churchy" looking. It also SAYS Hammond on it :-)   Vicki  
(back) Subject: Registration From: "Rick Williams" <Rick@netlink.nlink.com> Date: Mon, 11 May 1998 09:03:29 -0500   Hi group!   Yesterday I tried a different (very different for me) registration on the = second verse of Beautiful Savior. Swell =3D Flute 8' + 2'; Great =3D = Principal 8'; Pedal =3D Soft 16'. I played soprano and alto on the great = and tenor on the swell. It was very interesting to hear the tenor sing = out over the other parts. I found that the tenor line had to be very = carefully articulated or the affect was a disaster. I also tried with an = 8' flute on the pedal and it gave a slightly tighter overall sound. Just = thought I'd share. =20   Have a great week! = = = = = = = = =20  
(back) Subject: Re: Registration From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Mon, 11 May 1998 10:03:36 -0400   It must have been one of those days! I solo'd the tenor line of "Sing of Mary" (Pleading Savior) on the Trompette & foundations with the box half closed, played against Great Principals 8 4 & flute 2. I learned this in a workshop by Gerre Hancock many years ago. It is amazing what nice descants tenor lines often make.   bruce o h s __________ a g o cornely o o __________ o o ........... cremona84000@webtv.net ...........    
(back) Subject: Vicki's Organ From: Shakehip <Shakehip@aol.com> Date: Mon, 11 May 1998 10:07:22 EDT   You may have just described an A-100...   Can someone please post the subscription address of the Organ mailing list that is mostly Hammond players and techs (Ham tech ?) for Vicki ?   -- Yours,   Ed  
(back) Subject: Re: Speaking of organ training... From: Picander <Picander@aol.com> Date: Mon, 11 May 1998 10:21:14 EDT   In a message dated 98-05-10 15:53:32 EDT, you write:   > > As I started my new church organist position today, I'm still learning about > the beast I'm supposed to tame. I gather from this post it's a B3. I know > it's about 12 years old, and so far seems to be pretty user-friendly. > >   B3? A-100? Only 12 years old? What year is this, 1972? Wow I feel young again!   Brent Peterson Phoenix, Arizona  
(back) Subject: Wedding Potpourri From: Vernon Moeller <vernonm@ccsi.com> Date: Mon, 11 May 1998 11:14:26 -0500   Howdy, Y'All!   Regarding Bruce's assessment of Stookey's Wedding Song, I have just two words for Bruce: "Pipe down!" ;-)   I was very much alive and kicking when that song first came out, and I think it served a purpose then. A lot of today's young brides are using that song because it reminds their parents of *their* weddings, when the song was probably sung in an attempt to have something "new" and "refreshing" added to the music selections. At *their* weddings, *their* parents probably insisted on having somebody get up and sing "Because" or "Oh Promise Me," for the same reasons that Stookey's song is being sung today. Weddings are a wonderful time for nostalgia.   But I completely agree with those of you who tire of having to play the 3-page sheet music version of this song. It is deadly boring, and I support new ways of accompanying it, which is why I think y'all should recall that in the original version, a guitar was used to provide accompaniment, not an organ. I don't believe that the organ is the best instrument for this piece. Believe it or not, there are some songs better left to other instruments.   I have found what I believe is the best arrangement of this song that I have ever heard or played. My wife, a fine soprano in her own right, and a woman of impeccable musical taste, will not sing this song for a wedding unless we use this version. It is in E-flat, and it has a piano accompaniment. This version *might* sound OK on organ, but I've never been desperate enough to try it. Even if there is no piano in a sanctuary, somebody will find a Roland-style electronic keyboard with a sustain pedal, and the piece will work. It is published by Maranatha, in a wedding book, I think. It has a wonderful piano accompaniment, not very difficult, with ample opportunity for a capable pianist to add occasional ornaments here and there. I think what makes the arrangement so nice is that the vocalist is not singing constantly: there are several moments where the piano takes the lead by repeating slightly changed motives here and there. In short, if you hear it, I bet you'll like it.   Re: FLESH OF MY FLESH - Last year, I had to accompany a woman who sang this song at a wedding (I think it's the same song - it has lyrics like "You are flesh of my flesh, bone of my bones..."). Unfortunately, it called to mind a copy of an old radio show that I have, where Bela Lugosi snarls the very same words, with somewhat different intentions on his mind. But anyway, the woman I accompanied could not read music, and even though she had a nice voice, she didn't have a microphone, so I did what any decent accompanist (who didn't want to get lost AGAIN, like happened so many times at practice) would do - I drowned her out, and when I ended the song, she knew it was finished. Those of you who see it coming - be ye warned: this is not a fun song to play. When the bride tells you, "My singer sounds just like Celine Dion," tell her to hire Celine Dion and you'll do the wedding for free, just for the experience of watching Celine get lost in that musical mire. Musically speaking, the song is trash, IMHO.   Re: Studying organ vs studying piano - Dream on, folks.   My organ teacher is one of those strange people who never played piano but went straight to the organ. Now, she is looking for a good piano teacher for her two teenage daughters. What does that tell you? Even she will admit that she has missed out on a lot of really fine musical literature, and that she can't play a piano pianistically. I've heard her play, and while she can make an organ stand up and do cartwheels, her piano playing leaves a lot to be desired. IMO, it's easier to explain differences in touch if you can readily discern those differences by playing a piano keyboard: hit it hard, and you get lots of sound; stroke it softly, and the sound changes correspondingly.   I would not (and do not) encourage parents to start their kids on organ until they have grasped the finer points of music reading and keyboard technique, tasks best accomplished through several years of competent piano study.   If you want to argue this point, let's take a poll: how many PipeChatters started on the organ and learned piano later, as opposed to vice-versa? What would they prefer for their own children, or recommend to somebody who knew neither instrument?   I also strongly encourage organists to play piano for parts of church services, occasionally. I do not play all the hymns on the organ. Just yesterday, I played #643 "When Love is Found" (GIFT OF LOVE) for the middle hymn on the piano, because I think that hymn is more pianistic and calls for a moving, guitar-like accompaniment during the long held notes at the end of each phrase.   Hope all you Moms out there had an enjoyable day yesterday. My belated best wishes for a happy day, and many more to follow.   \/\/\    
(back) Subject: Re: Piano study poll - - was Wedding Potpourri From: GRS Co LVR <GRSCoLVR@aol.com> Date: Mon, 11 May 1998 13:08:45 EDT   Hello Listers!   Regards the proposed poll as to piano study before organ study-----   I studied piano for 10 years before being *allowed* to begin organ study,,and for the next 3 years took 1 week piano and then 1 week organ and so forth. I can say that I never have regretted it in the least, however as a teenager I did regret that I could not get to the *king of instruments* fast enuf to suit me. Being out of my 20's heheh, I asked a teen organist the same question, and his reply was 10 years piano study and then began organ.   bottom line -- 2 votes for thorough grounding in piano before organ.   However,,,my first organ teach always said---*The pipe organ is the easiest instrument to play---but the hardest to play right*   Cheers,   Roc   (Vernon--I hope you will tabulate the results and keep us posted)  
(back) Subject: RE: Piano study vs. organ study From: "Wildhirt, Richard" <Richard.Wildhirt@PSS.Boeing.com> Date: Mon, 11 May 1998 10:32:52 -0700   > If you want to argue this point, let's take a poll: how many > PipeChatters > started on the organ and learned piano later, as opposed to > vice-versa? > What would they prefer for their own children, or recommend to > somebody who > knew neither instrument? > I took two years of piano before I started on the organ at age 11. For any young aspiring musician, I'd recommend the same. Get the basics on the piano, then branch off to the organ (or other keyboard instrument). At the same time, keep up on piano skills and technique while learning the organ.  
(back) Subject: A Very Barton Day or Theatre Organ Lovers Field Day (Cross Posted) From: "Jon C. Habermaas" <opus1100@theatreorgans.com> Date: Mon, 11 May 1998 13:04:52 -0500   Some much has hit these lists lately about strife and turmoil in the Chicago Theatre Organ Community..the following is posted as a contrast to show we can have a good time in spite of what a few would like you to think..   On May 9th a busload of CATOE members got an early start on what was to be a day of enjoying theatre organs and camaraderie. After a sumptuous breakfast buffet at the Ohare Mariott, our first stop was the Coronado Theatre in Rockford, Illinois. This theatre is a real surprise as the first impression from the exterior is not too imposing. Inside you discover an exquisite preserved 20's movie palace. Upon first entering the theatre we were greeted by wide selection of goodies provided by our host, the Land of Lincoln Theatre Organ Society. This was not to be a day to be enjoyed by conscientious calorie counters. According the Land of Lincoln: "This magnificent atmospheric theatre, replete with Moroccan village, chinese dragons, Spanish dancers and Egyptian frieze and star-studded sky has never been remodeled or renovated and stands today as it appeared at the grand opening on October 9, 1927." The mighty Grande Barton organ was superbly demonstrated by Barry Baker to the members of CATOE and Land of Lincoln members in attendance. We were informed that this may be the last chance to see the Coronado and the Barton for sometime as the theatre will go dark for about 18 months for a 32 million dollar renovation by the city of Rockford to improve the stage and staging support facilities, dressing rooms and other facilities to make this a foremost performing arts center. The main auditorium will not be disturbed by this massive project. It is reassuring with this type of commitment that the future of the theatre and the organ looks bright. Our next stop on the "CATOE Motor Coach and Electric Railway Tour" was the AL Ringling Theatre in Baraboo, Wisconsin. The roots of the Ringling Brothers is in Baraboo and the circus and the Ringlings are still represented by the "Circus World Museum" in Baraboo and the Al Ringling Theatre. Our visit was enhanced by a tour of the theatre which is a "miniature" replica of a Paris opera house. Completed in 1915 this theatre was possibly the first of the atmospheric theatres and is said to have influenced B&K in the theatres they built later in Chicago. The 3/9 Barton organ which fills the playhouse was first demonstrated by our guide from "The Al Ringling Theatre Friends" association and later by the versatile stylings of our fellow traveler from Champaign, Illinois, Warren York. Last stop on this tour was at the Trolley Museum at East Troy, Wisconsin. Here the last vestige of the vast Milwaukee Railway Interurban system survives as 7 mile electric freight line linking the village of East Troy to the railroad interchange at Mukwonago. The line is operated for the village by a trolley museum, The East Troy Electric Railroad, which operates vintage electric cars as a tourist line. The museum also operates a very successful dinner train, which was the reason for our visit. The train consists of a former Chicago South Shore and South Bend interurban coach which has been remodeled into a diner. The operation has been so successful that the museum has remodeled a second South Shore car for dining service. The car is very tastefully remodeled and the best description that can be used is "elegant". Crisp linens and sparkling dinner ware accent the sumptuous meal which is served as the car is underway on the short trip on the East Troy Railway. The dinner trip makes it worth visiting East Troy, but be advised that it is so popular that reservations are required. My organ tolerant wife asked what the correlation is between organs and trains. This has been hashed and rehashed extensively on the lists with no conclusions reached. I think our older daughter may have summed it up quite simply: "They both have whistles"   Jon C. Habermaas       w  
(back) Subject: R.I.P GEORGE WRIGHT! From: WILLSONR <WILLSONR@aol.com> Date: Mon, 11 May 1998 15:09:51 EDT   Dear Pipechat List Subscribers,   I received this message from the President of ATOS this morning.   "It has just come to my attention that George Wright passed away this Sunday, May 10. He died peacefully of congestive heart failure.   Any expressions of condolence should be sent to BANDA Records P O Box 1620 Agoura Hills, CA 91376-1620   or to   Banda@westworld.com   I'm sure we all will miss this inventive genius. Even those who do not particularly care for Theatre Organ but have heard George will understand.   The end of an era.   Harry Heth, President American Theatre Organ Society"   Indeed, the end of an era.   I will always have fond memories of George's midnight concerts at the San Francisco Fox Theatre.   Dick Willson   :  
(back) Subject: The Legend--GEORGE WRIGHT--Thoughts-- From: danbel@earthlink.net Date: Mon, 11 May 1998 16:57:50 -0400   Dear lists,   I feel like I must say a few things regarding the passing of The Living Legend--or maybe now just "the Legend"--George Wright.   I think back to the night I won the doorprize at the local Hammond Organ Society when I was 9 years old. It was a copy of an album called "The Wright Touch" by George Wright. I took the album home and played it several times straight through before turning off the stereo. I was mesmerized by that sound--the sound of a wonderfully done theatre pipe organ with an absolute master at the console. It was my first exposure to TO and I personally believe it to have been the major factor in my choosing the theatre organ as my ultimate form of musical expression.   Through these years I have managed to meet George--make friends with him--argue musical points with him--and consistantly be inspired by him. Although not close in the past few years, George was my friend and my mentor. Every time I spoke to him I hung up the phone and went straight to the organ----something in the conversation had sparked a new musical point.   George was a true original. Yes, he loved and made use of many "tricks" of the late Jesse Crawford---BUT, he never failed to make the musical presentation all his own before it was over with. He made you feel the emotion of the music. He used whatever instrument he was playing at the time to convey every last tear filled ballad----every last joy filled novelty tune--every last ounce of excitement of that broadway show medley--HIS way-- A "way" which was just another example of his love for the music and the instrument.   Just like most theatre organ artists of my generation, I went through my period of wanting to play note for note George Wright arrangements---and I didn't do a bad job of it--or so he told me one time in my hometown Hammond dealership. Years after that, he also told me that he was very proud of the fact that I had managed to discover my own style and use for the instrument rather than relying on anothers inventiveness. THAT was a turning point---for me and my music---again through the courtesy of George Wright.   George was continually a musical inspiration in many many ways and his recordings will allow him to continue that inspiration for not only myself but all other people who choose to open their minds and ears to this wonderful instrument that George introduced to so many. I would like to think that many of my present day collegues would be willing to also admit that their own music is probably better for the fact that they had the opportunity to listen to and know George. So many people in general seem to not be willing to admit what is so obviously true when you hear them play. I am proud to say that I loved the mans music and that it had it's lasting effect on my own work. I, along with many of my collegues, will continue to use those registrations that are so very familiar to TO folks---and one of these days we will ALL be able to thank George for allowing us to borrow bits and pieces of his genius to incorporate into our own style.   I owe George so very much---for his inspiration, friendship and belief in my own worth as a musician. As he said in an out-take, "the session is over, let's go home." George is home. He is at peace. He knows we are all thinking about him today---I just know it. He's probably also enjoying a libation of some sort with Jesse Crawford and Eddie Dunstedter and that thought makes me smile!   We shall forever remember you George----we shall forever be thankful for your enrichment of our lives----musically and personally.   Dan Bellomy    
(back) Subject: RE: Piano study vs. organ study From: "SM Fitzgerald" <orgel@shianet.org> Date: Mon, 11 May 1998 17:14:16 -0400   I taught myself piano and had only one lesson in proper technique prior to taking up the organ formally. I played piano 10 years, however, prior to my begging organ studies. What I found more difficult was after many years of formal classical guitar study, organ study meant having to translate fingers and learning not to attack the keys like strings! The most difficult area in organ study for me still is in trying not to loose the left hand tenor/alto parts in the midst of feet and right hand voices.   As a parish music director, I have seen many pianists who took up the organ with out ever studying the organ and its literature. Often these were in poorer Catholic parishes where they did not have a good instrument--often it is an older Allen or Hammond. They don't know how to even begin approaching the organ as an organ, let alone understand the differences in finger technique and the appropriate style.   Scott Fitzgerald Owosso, Michigan www.shianet.org/~orgel     >-----Original Message----- >From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org]On Behalf Of >Wildhirt, Richard >Sent: Monday, May 11, 1998 1:33 PM >To: 'PipeChat' >Subject: RE: Piano study vs. organ study > > >> If you want to argue this point, let's take a poll: how many >> PipeChatters >> started on the organ and learned piano later, as opposed to >> vice-versa? >> What would they prefer for their own children, or recommend to >> somebody who >> knew neither instrument? >> >I took two years of piano before I started on the organ at age 11. For >any young aspiring musician, I'd recommend the same. Get the basics on >the piano, then branch off to the organ (or other keyboard instrument). >At the same time, keep up on piano skills and technique while learning >the organ. > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >    
(back) Subject: Re: Vicki's Organ From: Jacob Nelson <nelsonje@plu.edu> Date: Mon, 11 May 1998 14:34:48 -0700 (PDT)       On Mon, 11 May 1998, Shakehip wrote:   > Can someone please post the subscription address of the Organ mailing list > that is mostly Hammond players and techs (Ham tech ?) for Vicki ?   I don't have the list address right at hand, but there is a wealth of information on Hammond organs at http://theatreorgans.com/hammond including pictures, the FAQ, and links to many other sites.   jake      
(back) Subject: We who started on the organ/Wedding Potpourri From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Mon, 11 May 1998 17:47:49 -0400   At the risk of being told to "Pipe Down" ;-( I will go out on the limb and admit/proclaim that I started on the organ, and when as a child of 11 was given a piano scholarship by the church I attended, dumped piano lessons because the teacher said I had to quit playing the organ until I learned piano (she was an organist, although not a very good one as I recall). I learned literature on my own with occasional help from our parish organist. I studied piano for a couple of years (around age 15) with a sympathetic teacher who introduced me to some really neat piano literature (Schubert being my favorite). I did not again play piano literature again until I began teaching piano. I figured that with a bunch of piano students i should be able to play literature. It was great fun and I think that playing the organ helped me to play piano because I knew about crossed voices and substitutions. In my present and past postion, I play(ed) organ and piano, and now I use the piano in almost all Masses when I think a piece will sound better on it. I also do improvisations on the piano during communion at the contemporary Mass. I've had no problem going back and forth (heh heh since pianos are mechanical action!!).   bruce o h s __________ a g o cornely o o __________ o o ........... cremona84000@webtv.net ...........    
(back) Subject: Re: Piano study vs. organ study From: tom rishel <trishel@hhs.net> Date: Mon, 11 May 1998 18:09:13 -0700   I guess I am one of the oddballs who started off on the organ at the tender age of 5. Actually, I started off on a small 2-octave keyboard that my grandmother bought me when I was 4 for christmas. I started coming home from church and playing some of the hymns by ear and so the next christmas my mother bought me a small electric organ. Now, I have a larger electric organ and am playing at a church that has a very large, mostly digital organ.   As for whether or not one 'should' take piano before organ, I really can't say. Speaking for myself, I don't think I would've wanted it any other way. Only now am I becoming interested in piano and good piano technique to broaden my horizons. I think it just depends on the individual whether or not to start on the organ.   Tom Rishel