PipeChat Digest #371 - Tuesday, May 12, 1998
 
RE: Piano study vs. organ study
  by "Cheryl C Hart" <info@copemanhart.co.uk>
Pipe organs in Greece? (cross posted)
  by "Cheryl C Hart" <info@copemanhart.co.uk>
Re: Pipe organs in Greece? (cross posted)
  by "Thomas Haubrich" <haubt000@goofy.zdv.Uni-Mainz.de>
Re: What is Happening at Coral Ridge?
  by "Dr. Darryl Miller" <OrganDok@safari.net>
Re: Piano/Organ
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com>
Re: Piano study vs. organ study
  by "Shakehip" <Shakehip@aol.com>
RE: organ lessons first
  by "SM Fitzgerald" <orgel@shianet.org>
RE: piano study vs. organ study
  by "Jeff Luttrell" <jpluttrell@mindspring.com>
Instrument Choice in liturgical setting (was Piano study vs. organ study)
  by "SM Fitzgerald" <orgel@shianet.org>
RE: Piano study vs. organ study
  by "SM Fitzgerald" <orgel@shianet.org>
George Wright
  by "Owen Jones" <owenj@dynamite.com.au>
Re: Piano study vs. organ study
  by "Robert Horton" <r-horton@nwu.edu>
Re: PipeChat Digest #370 - 05/12/98
  by "Y6717" <Y6717@aol.com>
Re: Piano/Organ
  by "Dr. Edward Peterson" <epeterso@madison.tdsnet.com>
New addition
  by "Wildhirt, Richard" <Richard.Wildhirt@PSS.Boeing.com>
Re: The Legend--GEORGE WRIGHT--Thoughts-
  by " JACK   MOELMANN" <RJGP84A@prodigy.com>
Re: The Legend--GEORGE WRIGHT--Thoughts-
  by "ScottFop" <ScottFop@aol.com>
 


(back) Subject: RE: Piano study vs. organ study From: Cheryl C Hart <info@copemanhart.co.uk> Date: Tue, 12 May 1998 10:20:41 +0100   I started with piano when I was 4, was introduced to harmonium at 7 (boy, was it tiring to pump that thing and play it!) and organ when 8 - my father, who was a good organist, was my first teacher. Thinking about it now, I would not have had it any other way.   Cheryl       COPEMAN HART & COMPANY LTD Church Organ Builders ENGLAND Tel 01933 652600 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ US CONSULTANCY: Copeman Hart - America Email Cpmnhartus@aol.com Tel 423 482 8600 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ AUSTRALIAN CONSULTANCY: Copeman Hart - Australia Email hamilton.stives@bigpond.com Tel 02 9983 9775 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~    
(back) Subject: Pipe organs in Greece? (cross posted) From: Cheryl C Hart <info@copemanhart.co.uk> Date: Tue, 12 May 1998 10:20:43 +0100   At the end of next week I'm away to spend a couple of weeks or so with my daughter who lives near Athens, Greece. I know there's a Kenneth Jones two-manual and pedal continuo organ in Athens Concert Hall - I haven't heard it yet - but does anyone know of any other pipe organs I should make a point of visiting?   Cheryl   COPEMAN HART & COMPANY LTD Church Organ Builders ENGLAND Tel 01933 652600 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ US CONSULTANCY: Copeman Hart - America Email Cpmnhartus@aol.com Tel 423 482 8600 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ AUSTRALIAN CONSULTANCY: Copeman Hart - Australia Email hamilton.stives@bigpond.com Tel 02 9983 9775 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~    
(back) Subject: Re: Pipe organs in Greece? (cross posted) From: "Thomas Haubrich" <haubt000@goofy.zdv.Uni-Mainz.de> Date: Tue, 12 May 1998 12:03:10 +0200   Dear Cheryl!   A new big Klais (4/70 I think) was inaugurated two or three years ago in Athens, I think it was in the Concert hall, but I'll look for it in my Ars Organi journals.   Til later!   Thomas        
(back) Subject: Re: What is Happening at Coral Ridge? From: "Dr. Darryl Miller" <OrganDok@safari.net> Date: Tue, 12 May 1998 07:07:41 -0400   JEKroep@hrn.bradley.edu wrote:   >=20 > I am very interested to find out the up-to-date details about the searc= h > at Coral Ridge.=20   The up-to-date details are that we are accepting applications for the position of Senior Organist. The job description and pictures and words about the organ are on the CRPC web site.=20   It was probaly already announced, but I did not see it. >=20 Nope, no reason to say anything until one has something to say. And=85we don't=85yet!   Yours,   Darryl Miller Coral Ridge Presbyterian Church Fort Lauderdale  
(back) Subject: Re: Piano/Organ From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com> Date: Tue, 12 May 1998 06:48:09 -0500 (CDT)   At 11:36 PM 5/11/98 -0400, Bruce Cornely wrote: >>one has enough trouble with the pedals >>without trying to learn too much at one time. > >Judy, >If one starts on the organ at age 9, the pedals would not be a problem, >and there is plenty of easy stuff to play ("from a wigwam" works great >on a choir clarinet!). By the time 11 or 12 is reached, so are the >second and third manuals, and maybe the pedals, also the 2' stops and >reeds if you have a drawknob console!   There is in my experience some practical truth to what Bruce says. I went to a school in England which had a three manual and pedal pipe organ in the school chapel and a two manual and pedal tracker in the music room. It was normal for students to do around 5 years on the piano before going on to the organ, though I came to it rather late and was allowed to get away with only two years of piano. I have never been one of the world's great organists, so perhaps 5 years of piano is important! Anyway, we had one student, a few years younger than me, who was a child prodigy. He was the descendent of a famous eighteenth-century English organist, so it must have been in the genes. He was already concertizing as a pianist by the age of ten and wanted to go onto the organ. He was quite a little fellow, however (though with an enormous head, hands and feet), and he was thirteen before he could reach the pedals. With a cushion he was always able to reach the top manual, but the pedals really were a problem until he grew larger. When he was able to start the organ he learnt fast. When he was fourteen I came into the chapel and found him effortlessly playing Franck's Piece Heroique from sight. He is now a professor of medicine, but still enjoys playing the piano and organ and gives the occasional concert. The moral is, though, that if we are going to let younger children learn the organ, we will need to build some special organs with smaller consoles.   John.    
(back) Subject: Re: Piano study vs. organ study From: Shakehip <Shakehip@aol.com> Date: Tue, 12 May 1998 07:48:19 EDT   I started out on piano (classical in the wee tender years, Jazz in the teens) and switched to organ after I got into the B3 sound.   I can only speak from a Jazz perspective on this, but I have conflicting thoughts.   First, when I play organ, I notice that I have to think more like an "arranger" than a mere performer. Learning how to voice for different instruments (even though this is a skill lacking in many Hammond players) I feel is a necessity for any theatre/Jazz organist with an improv. or even "spontaneous" style. Piano is the ultimate training ground for theory and composition since it encompasses the entire gamut of the orchestra. I also found that as a B3 player who takes advantage of the the percussion settings a lot, piano conditioned my hands for this, and also got me to think independently. Unfortunately, it never taught me how to use my feet.   What I did notice about organ though, is that the principal of K.I.S.S. (Keep it simple stupid) is generally more prevalent than in piano. Of course this is coming from the perspective that the piano is a "solo" instrument and the organ is often (though obviously not always) a synthetic orchestra. (Of course, in Hammond style, the reverse is often true.) But the fact is, time and time again, the organist confronts significantly difficult passages, licks, runs, lines (or whatever you wish to call them) - - as a chop builder, nothing beats the piano with its weighted keys. The piano however exists in the "two dimensional" world, the organ is 3D. . . The transition in thinking makes me wonder whether or not it is best to start on the piano or study piano alongside.   I can only conclude that despite the differences between the two instruments, any player would be at a loss not to take advantage of the similarities of both and study both together. Whether one should be a pre-requisite for the other, I'm not so sure about that.   Yours,   Ed  
(back) Subject: RE: organ lessons first From: "SM Fitzgerald" <orgel@shianet.org> Date: Tue, 12 May 1998 07:58:50 -0400   Bruce: please WRITE such a book!   >-----Original Message----- >From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org]On Behalf Of >bruce cornely >Sent: Monday, May 11, 1998 11:50 PM >To: PipeChat >Subject: Re: organ lessons first > > >>ear training, sight reading, scales, theory.... > >imagine how much more fun it would be to play contrary motion scales >with the left hand on a Cromorne and the right hand on a Cornet. Ear >training to include not only pitches and intervals but tone colors as >well. Theory to include intervals, stop pitches & the harmonic series. >Seems it would be much more interesting and fun on the organ; it was >for me! > >bruce o h s __________ a g o >cornely o o __________ o o > ........... cremona84000@webtv.net ........... > > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >  
(back) Subject: RE: piano study vs. organ study From: Jeff Luttrell <jpluttrell@mindspring.com> Date: Tue, 12 May 1998 08:00:48 -0400 (EDT)   Although some of my earliest and fondest musical memories as a small child are of sitting behind my church organist and watching in fascination as she "played with her feet," I studied piano first. I still advocate that. I studied piano from 3rd grade through high school. The summer after 10th grade, I took a few organ lessons during the summer from the church organist (a different lady by that point), and practiced diligently enough to become coordinated. I remember that the Doxology was the first hymn she gave me. The pedal line was a challenge, but after I mastered that, other things came easily. She was gracious enough to allow me to substitute for her on various occasions. Oh yes, the organ was a 4 manual Moller.   When high school graduation rolled around, it rained. So instead of being in the football stadium with the band playing Pomp and Circumstance, we were in the auditorium with yours truly cranking it out on what I believe was a Lowrey. My band director happened to be the min of mus at the First Christian Church in town, and he offered me a summer job as organist at his church before I left for college (a 2 manual Rodgers). So I went off to college in the fall as a piano pedagogy major with 3 months of church organist experience under my belt. During that freshman year I studied organ as a secondary instrument and played the Bach C Major Prelude and Fugue (with the opening pedal solo) on a student recital. I loved everything about organ study. At the beginning of my sophomore year, I changed to an organ performance major and already had more than enough piano hours to be finished with the secondary requirement ahead of time.   I went back home to my summer organist position again, and eventually received my master's degree in organ.   I'm very thankful for the piano background, because through the years I've needed to do so much accompanying on piano. I would not want to be any less proficient on piano at all.   BTW, the other organs I've played in church positions are a very nice 2 manual Reuter, a very large 4 manual Reuter in a room with horrible acoustics, an interesting hodgepodge of a pipe organ constructed from leftover and discarded parts, a 3 manual Rodgers from the Westminster series, and currently a 3 manual, 42 rank Reuter in a wonderful room. A little heavy on the Reuters, I know.   Sueda Luttrell Organist/Music Assoc. FBC, Marietta, GA    
(back) Subject: Instrument Choice in liturgical setting (was Piano study vs. organ study) From: "SM Fitzgerald" <orgel@shianet.org> Date: Tue, 12 May 1998 08:09:45 -0400   Actually, there is quite a different feel of each string--the texture and thickness. And even though the same pitch may be in several places on the neck, the timbre is different for each of them. Also where one places the right hand over the strings relative to the sound hole and bridge also affects the tone. But as an instructor of guitar, piano, organ, and voice, it is my opinion that guitar is the hardest from the standpoint of hand dexterity. Many many people play guitar simply if not badly (3 chord folks), but few play it well to the point of understanding the nuances of the instrument, let alone understanding what makes a given song "guitaristic".   As a parish music director in a Catholic church we have a very nice 55 "rank" Allen digital organ, a 7'6" Yamaha concert grand piano, 2 Kurzweiler synthesizers, and several guitar choices from my classical guitar, to steal strings, to a professional jazz guitarist who plays in my contemporary ensemble. So I have lots of freedom in choosing which song gets treated with which instrument.   I have found that some songs just work better on organ, and some are better on piano. Some of the early liturgy-reform pieces from Catholic musical literature (Saint Louis Jesuits, et al), just voice better on guitar because they were composed on the guitar and the simplicity of tonal structure lends itself to that medium.   Remember the Christmas hymn "Silent Night" was written and first performed on guitar because the parish organ was broke!   Peace.   Scott Fitzgerald Owosso, Michigan www.shianet.org/~orgel   >-----Original Message----- >From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org]On Behalf Of >Shirley >Sent: Monday, May 11, 1998 6:04 PM >To: PipeChat >Subject: RE: Piano study vs. organ study > > >At 17:14 05/11/98 -0400, Scott wrote: > >>What I found more difficult was after many years of >>formal classical guitar study, organ study meant having to >translate fingers >>and learning not to attack the keys like strings! > >Har! I have tried twice now, once for a course requirement, to play the >guitar. And I get lost! Every fret looks and feels alike... there's no >reference point like there is with the black keys on the keyboard! Also, >the same pitch can be in several different locations, depending on >fingering and what string is used. On piano, middle C, for example, or >A440, are only in *one* place. > > --Shirley > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >    
(back) Subject: RE: Piano study vs. organ study From: "SM Fitzgerald" <orgel@shianet.org> Date: Tue, 12 May 1998 08:11:57 -0400   Fascinating reply, thanks Ed.   >-----Original Message----- >From: pipechat@pipechat.org [mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org]On Behalf Of >Shakehip >Sent: Tuesday, May 12, 1998 7:48 AM >To: pipechat@pipechat.org >Subject: Re: Piano study vs. organ study > > >I started out on piano (classical in the wee tender years, Jazz >in the teens) >and switched to organ after I got into the B3 sound. > >I can only speak from a Jazz perspective on this, but I have conflicting >thoughts. > >First, when I play organ, I notice that I have to think more like an >"arranger" than a mere performer. Learning how to voice for different >instruments (even though this is a skill lacking in many Hammond >players) I >feel is a necessity for any theatre/Jazz organist with an improv. or even >"spontaneous" style. Piano is the ultimate training ground for >theory and >composition since it encompasses the entire gamut of the >orchestra. I >also found that as a B3 player who takes advantage of the percussion >settings a lot, piano conditioned my hands for this, and also got >me to think >independently. Unfortunately, it never taught me how to use my feet. > >What I did notice about organ though, is that the principal of >K.I.S.S. (Keep >it simple stupid) is generally more prevalent than in piano. >Of course >this is coming from the perspective that the piano is a "solo" >instrument and >the organ is often (though obviously not always) a synthetic orchestra. >(Of course, in Hammond style, the reverse is often true.) But >the fact is, >time and time again, the organist confronts significantly >difficult passages, >licks, runs, lines (or whatever you wish to call them) - - as a >chop builder, >nothing beats the piano with its weighted keys. The piano >however exists >in the "two dimensional" world, the organ is 3D. . . The transition in >thinking makes me wonder whether or not it is best to start on >the piano or >study piano alongside. > >I can only conclude that despite the differences between the two >instruments, >any player would be at a loss not to take advantage of the similarities of >both and study both together. Whether one should be a >pre-requisite for >the other, I'm not so sure about that. > >Yours, > >Ed > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >    
(back) Subject: George Wright From: Owen Jones <owenj@dynamite.com.au> Date: Tue, 12 May 1998 22:44:43 +1000   I rec'd the news of George's passing with a feeling of deep sadness. I bought my first GW lp in 1958 "Have Organ will Travel". I played it every day, my parents told me that if they heard Granada one more time, they would....   That didn't stop my love of his mastery and his music. I think bought all of his albums, maybe missed one or two. I played them so many times on my old garrard turntable, never tiring of the wonderful sounds emanating from the speaker, no stereo in my early days.   His recordings inspired me to learn music and the organ in my early teens.   George will be sadly missed by all those who loved him and loved his music.   Goodbye. GW    
(back) Subject: Re: Piano study vs. organ study From: Robert Horton <r-horton@nwu.edu> Date: Mon, 11 May 1998 18:55:22 -0500   At 05:46 PM 5/11/98 -0500, you wrote: >> If you want to argue this point, let's take a poll: how many >> PipeChatters >> started on the organ and learned piano later, as opposed to >> vice-versa? Believe it or don't, piano lessons were what drove me from the piano and into the organ loft. I decided to take formal piano lessons when I entered high school after getting as far as can be expected in "autotutorial". After one semester I had enough of the environment fostered in college vis a vis pianists..."I can play the Minute Waltz in 55 seconds, what about you?..." Couldn't hack it and didn't want to take the practice room heat, so I started organ lessons. (haven't looked back I'm very glad I made that choice, needless to say) In terms of actual playing time on piano, I guess I futzed around for three years, took lessons for four months, and then made a dash for the organ loft. Six months later I was buzzing through Bach P&F's.   >> What would they prefer for their own children, or recommend to >> somebody who >> knew neither instrument? Start on piano, no doubt there. Once you've reached the point where you're playing 2-part inventions and sinfonias, it's time to start on the organ.     Robert Horton, Millar Chapel Organ Scholar 825 Foster Street, Evanston, IL 60201 tel. 847.424.9368 http://pubweb.nwu.edu/~rch507/   Q. How many organists does it take to change a light bulb? A. Four...one to change the bulb and three to complain that the light switch needs combination pistons.  
(back) Subject: Re: PipeChat Digest #370 - 05/12/98 From: Y6717 <Y6717@aol.com> Date: Tue, 12 May 1998 09:08:10 EDT   From: LISTSERV@HOME.EASE.LSOFT.COM (Automatic digest processor) Sender: HAMTECH@HOME.EASE.LSOFT.COM (The Hammond List) Reply-to: HAMTECH@HOME.EASE.LSOFT.COM (The Hammond List) To: HAMTECH@HOME.EASE.LSOFT.COM (Recipients of HAMTECH digests)  
(back) Subject: Re: Piano/Organ From: epeterso@madison.tdsnet.com (Dr. Edward Peterson) Date: Tue, 12 May 1998 08:36:38 -0500   On Tue, 12 May 1998 06:48:09 -0500 (CDT), "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com> wrote:   [...] >The moral is, though, that >if we are going to let younger children learn the organ, we will need to >build some special organs with smaller consoles.     This just in:   The Wall Street Journal reports that organ stock prices have continued their precipitous tumble upon news that the federal government has issued a series of edicts to protect the rights of all persons who might wish to play the organ and those who *think* they might wish to play the organ. This is only one of an increasing number of problems the organ industry has encountered at the hands of the bureaucrats in recent years.   The EPA's order to eliminate lead and other hazardous substances from all future organs and the multi-billion dollar lead abatement program currently in effect for existing organs has produced little improvement in the quality of anyone's life, but the program continues unabated.   Representatives from the Persons with Disabilities League, in league with the 'Children Can Be Organists Too' Foundation, shouted down representatives of the A.G.O. who held a news conference recently to demonstrate that the "AGO Console" dimension standards adopted in 1932 and revised in 1961 had tried to meet the needs of organists and are user-friendly for enormous numbers of people. The naysayers quickly pointed to recent laws which mandate that *every* person must be accommodated no matter what the expense involved might be.   Meanwhile, Organ builders are hard at work on a console incorporating the organistic equivalent of the automotive tilting-telecoping steering wheel, but proponents held little hope that the process could be duplicated effectively in both keyboards and pedalboards.   An industry spokesman announced that after 300 years, only one organ in a hundred even had an adjustable bench. The spokesman declined comment on the government's requirement that all organs be "fully adjustable" by the Year 2000. He was seen, however, providing an Italian street gesture which the on-scene interpreter for the deaf rendered into verbal English - to the visible distress of the hearing unimpaired.   Meanwhile, organ firms continue to wrestle with the thorny problem of providing space on drawknobs to include the 165 Asian languages and dialects now required on all organs sold in California. Local broccoli growers were encouraged when it was discovered that the vegetable could be petrified and each element of the florets could be engraved with a variation of the stop name. The florets seemed admirably suited to this purpose and teen representatives of the splinter (and politically incorrect) group, Veggies Is Vile were seen to say: YESSSSS!!!   In their quest to solve the control problems for the proposed six basic console sizes, engineers at MS-IBM continued to struggle with the switching problems but determined that a "super-computer" like the highly successful Notre-Dame installation could be employed to route signal from console to pipes from one or any combination of consoles simultaneously. The "standard" console now has a hexagonal footprint and is built on a turntable which will allow organists to spin and choose a basic console size in accordance to their physical stature. Further refinements as mentioned above will be incorporated into all six console segments making the console's cost six times the present rate.   The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms is still undecided about their jurisdiction over "in-console drinks compartments", "smoke-free areas of the console", and whether organists should be allowed to keep fire-arms at the console. A recent university study has determined that 97.9% of organists have turned (or returned) to drinking and smoking. Equally alarming is the enormous increase in gun ownership, particularly amongst organists and builders who subscribe to the various internet "organ lists". Monitor sales have risen dramatically in recent months as disgruntled readers blast away at the 'offensive writings' appearing onscreen.   (Continued on A-37)   -----   See also the sidebar: "U.S. Scientists Alarmed at Frightening New Evidence Exposing Dangers of Electro-magnetic Fields Generated in Organ Console Wiring. Dementia Link Hinted."    
(back) Subject: New addition From: "Wildhirt, Richard" <Richard.Wildhirt@PSS.Boeing.com> Date: Tue, 12 May 1998 06:56:36 -0700   Hey, gang. I made it down to Vancouver (USA) this past Saturday to Uncle Milt's Pipe Organ Pizza Company for a 9:30 a.m. concert by Lew Williams.   Fantastic display of talent. This was the first time I had ever seen or heard Lew. He played the Widor Toccata, a nice Oklahoma! medley, and of course, Rhapsody in Blue.   He commented about the organ, saying it was always a pleasure to play this instrument, mainly because it does what it's supposed to do when one moves a stop tab or pushes a piston.   While I was there, I managed to snap some photos on a digital camera. You can see Uncle Milt's and the organ at http://theatreorgans.com/washington/vancouver/uncle_milts/. Thanks to Bob Rusczyk and Jerrell Kautz for their help in getting this web page established.   Here's to George! ____________________________________ Illiud Latine dici non potest. Rich Wildhirt Boeing Site Operations Project Management Renton, Washington (425) 234-8051  
(back) Subject: Re: The Legend--GEORGE WRIGHT--Thoughts- From: RJGP84A@prodigy.com ( JACK MOELMANN) Date: Tue, 12 May 1998 10:51:42, -0500   To Dan Bellomy and others on the list, I thought your expression of the impact that George Wright had on you was wonderful and your other thoughts posted on the list. I think I first heard George (and a theatre organ for that matter) when I was about 12 in Chicago Area. It was at a theatre, but it was the introduction of a new Gulbransen Theatre Organ (electronic). It was wonderful, he was wonderful. I had the opportunity to meet him on a couple of occasions and we had rooms across from each other at the Portland ATOS Convention in 1988. He would come over and we would chat (and yes, have a couple "Dr. Pepper's" as it were). I think I have almost all of his recordings and glad to hear that there are more on the way even after his passing. He will be missed, but never forgotten.   The world is no less of place since he is gone, but it is a much better place because he was here.   RIP   Jack Moelmann  
(back) Subject: Re: The Legend--GEORGE WRIGHT--Thoughts- From: ScottFop <ScottFop@aol.com> Date: Tue, 12 May 1998 12:23:45 EDT   It is because of the consummate musicianship George Wright (and others like Tom Hazleton and Virgil Fox) that I am an organist today. Needless to say- George did not affect my classical organ playing to any degree but, when I was in the 7th and 8th grade I got hold of my very first Organ Literature Foundation catalogs and ordered all the George Wright I could. I loved those records then and still love them now even though I've played them almost to the point of sheer unplayablilty. I even remember when "The Living Legend Plays the Chicago Theatre Organ" came out in a deluxe direct-to-disc package- I was in 9th grade and bought it at a little record shop in a mall in Hattiesburg, Mississippi while on a business trip with my dad. Upon the first hearing- I was hooked on theatre organ even more. Thank goodness for CDs that can now perpetuate these magnificent recordings!   About that same time I attended a performance of the Memphis Oratorio Society and the Memphis Symphony doing "The Messiah" by Handel at the Orpheum in downtown Memphis. Walking down that center aisle for the first time was also my first time seeing a movie palace, and what a grand one to see- an original 1928 Rapp and Rapp French Baroque house. Spectacular! Then, before hand the white Wurlitzer console rose out of the orchestra pit and I was hooked! I found the manager somehow and conned my way in the next morning to try this wonderful organ. That was all it took. Through recordings and study I learned the theatre pipe organ and much of its music and have never been sorry since.   I have heard Lyn Larsen, Tom Hazleton, Lew Williams and countless others tell these fascinating stories of Georgem his mannerisms, personality, musicianship and even other little details of his intriguing and endearing personality.   George Wright- thank you for sharing such an immense talent with the world and for providing such a high level of superb musicianship and encouragement to artists like myself and countless others. Rest in peace.   Scott Foppiano   PS- I have no doubt that, when George entered Heaven- the first thing he heard were Tibia Clausas with perfectly regulated trems that had been adjusted to within an inch of their lives!!!!