PipeChat Digest #382 - Friday, May 22, 1998
 
Re: Stijnkens Pipe makers
  by "bruce cornely" <cremona84000@webtv.net>
L'Organiste Question
  by <JEKroep@hrn.bradley.edu>
RE: "METAL" CHURCH MUSIC
  by "Wildhirt, Richard" <Richard.Wildhirt@PSS.Boeing.com>
Re: "METAL" CHURCH MUSIC
  by "Stanley E Yoder" <syoder+@andrew.cmu.edu>
Tuning again!
  by "Jenny Moon" <bfus7@central.susx.ac.uk>
"the mind idealizing the music"
  by "Bob Loesch" <rrloesch@jps.net>
Re: Entreat me not to leave thee
  by "Shirley" <pnst@itw.com>
Re: Ahlborn Module Question
  by "Shirley" <pnst@itw.com>
Re: Stijnkens Pipe makers
  by "Bob Loesch" <rrloesch@jps.net>
Wedding preludes/processionals and postludes/recessionals
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com>
July 4 music
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com>
Re: July 4 music
  by "Stephen F P Karr" <karrlist@scescape.net>
Re: July 4 music
  by "Shirley" <pnst@itw.com>
Re: July 4 music
  by "Bonnie Beth Derby" <orge@dreamscape.com>
Re: July 4 music
  by "Bonnie Beth Derby" <orge@dreamscape.com>
Re: July 4 music
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com>
Stanley
  by "Jenny Moon" <bfus7@central.susx.ac.uk>
Re: July 4 music
  by "Stanley Lowkis" <nstarfil@mediaone.net>
Re: July 4 music
  by "Stephen F P Karr" <karrlist@scescape.net>
Re: Ahlborn Module Question
  by "RSiegel920" <RSiegel920@aol.com>
Re: July 4 music
  by <sohmer@juno.com>
Re: The Silence of the Typing Hands.
  by "Kevin Cartwright" <kevin1@alaweb.com>
Re: July 4 music
  by "Bob Loesch" <rrloesch@jps.net>
Re: Entreat me not to leave thee
  by "Karl E. Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersv.edu>
Re: July 4 music
  by "KARL W KELLER" <kwkeller@juno.com>
Re: July 4 music
  by "Karl E. Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersv.edu>
How does an organ get me across town? (X-posted and more)
  by "Kevin Cartwright" <kevin1@alaweb.com>
Re: How does an organ get me across town? (X-posted and more)
  by "bruce cornely" <cremona84000@webtv.net>
 


(back) Subject: Re: Stijnkens Pipe makers From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Thu, 21 May 1998 07:47:59 -0400   >Principals??? I don' got to show you no >Stinkin' Principals!   Yo quero Taco Bells!   bruce o h s __________ a g o cornely o o __________ o o ........... cremona84000@webtv.net ...........    
(back) Subject: L'Organiste Question From: JEKroep@hrn.bradley.edu Date: 21 May 1998 07:46:34 CST/CDT   PI>Question on Franck's L'Organiste. ngs like PI>a 4' reed or a 16' string. Am I free to interpret as I wish?   PI>As a side note, I also have a little four-octave reed organ, one manual, two PI>ranks of reeds ... Boy do those L'Organiste pieces sound great on there!   Dear Bob,   o very diverse musicians.Nevertheless, the quality of the legoto state must never be broken, andplay expressively.   Jonathan Kroepel      
(back) Subject: RE: "METAL" CHURCH MUSIC From: "Wildhirt, Richard" <Richard.Wildhirt@PSS.Boeing.com> Date: Thu, 21 May 1998 07:00:20 -0700   > Let's hope that these new-found requests are only limited to wedding > music and > don't spill over into service music! :-( > > Bill Miller > It's happening as we speak!  
(back) Subject: Re: "METAL" CHURCH MUSIC From: Stanley E Yoder <syoder+@andrew.cmu.edu> Date: Thu, 21 May 1998 10:10:14 -0400 (EDT)   Excerpts from mail: 21-May-98 RE: "METAL" CHURCH MUSIC by "Wildhirt, Richard"@PSS. > Let's hope that these new-found requests are only limited to wedding > > music and > > don't spill over into service music! :-(   It IS a service, so it's already spilled. Stan Yoder Pittsburgh  
(back) Subject: Tuning again! From: Jenny Moon <bfus7@central.susx.ac.uk> Date: Thu, 21 May 1998 19:30:54 BST     Hi all   I have a reasonable amount of experience in tuning, and have found the most difficult part of the process to be laying the bearings.   Again, I have spent much of today researching this and professional organ tuners seem to share my opinion. Much of the time the bearings only require touching up and this is not to difficult assuming you know how the beats should be btween the forths and fifths and are competent when it comes to shading the pipes to check your work. The main problem comes when tuning an organ from scratch when the tuning is all over the place. Once you have set the middle C to concert pitch,which in my experince is set in the facory and is a slidless pipe, the problem really begins. It can take a whole mornings work just to set those few pipes, depending on temperature and the stubborness of the slides. (and the ability of the note holder). Can anybody give me any advice on this process and correct me on any of the points I have made. Thanks. Jen. bfus7@central.sussex.ac.uk          
(back) Subject: "the mind idealizing the music" From: Bob Loesch <rrloesch@jps.net> Date: Thu, 21 May 1998 13:42:25 -0700   Hi, List! Sorry for the delay in commenting on this, but I've been away...   >Glenda's retained comments about "the mind idealizing the music >one is actually hearing during a performance" reminded me of some >advice offered by Alfred Brendel, who tells pianists attempting >to play a certain work of Liszt to omit some of the notes because >the audience's ears would autamatically supply them.   This idea was known also by theatre organist Jesse Crawford, who used to skip notes in his famous 'glides' or 'glissandos' knowing that the ears of the listeners would make the sound continuous. I can also say from personal experience that it works. Thanks, Jesse!     Regards,   Bob        
(back) Subject: Re: Entreat me not to leave thee From: Shirley <pnst@itw.com> Date: Thu, 21 May 1998 17:02:54   Karl wrote, in a well-thought-out response:   >5. Love songs belong at the reception, not in a church wedding. A >wedding in a rose garden et al would not have this consideration, of >course.   So, Karl, so much of wedding music is from opera and "popular" culture... what do *you* use in your repertoire, in order to keep the wedding service of worship just that, worship? What do you suggest to vocalists?   --Shirley   PS - sorry for the delay in response to this... have been offline since Sunday.    
(back) Subject: Re: Ahlborn Module Question From: Shirley <pnst@itw.com> Date: Thu, 21 May 1998 17:10:00   How does one find a salesman?   Tnx.   --Shirley  
(back) Subject: Re: Stijnkens Pipe makers From: Bob Loesch <rrloesch@jps.net> Date: Thu, 21 May 1998 14:40:45 -0700   At 07:47 5/21/98 -0400, you wrote: >>Principals??? I don' got to show you no >>Stinkin' Principals! > >Yo quero Taco Bells!   For the edification of the undereducated, Taco Bells are used, played from the console, for renditions of the Cannon (in Bronze, with Black Powder) written by the famous composer Juan Pablo Tacobell.     Regards,   Bob        
(back) Subject: Wedding preludes/processionals and postludes/recessionals From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com> Date: Thu, 21 May 1998 19:36:13 -0500   This is a topic of interest to me - trying to get ideas for "new" things to do at weddings, which I worm my way out of as much as possible. Here are some things I've done, heard or heard of:   Processional:   Bridal Chorus from Lohengrin - used to do that years ago, before politically incorrect (and I agree it is inappropriate, but I marched in to it myself); I had an old piano version that possessed a nice short beginning interlude long enough to get groom and minister in place and bridesmaid started (in a small wedding)   Overture to "Royal Fireworks" - done that - good and majestic for bride to sweep in   David Johnson's Trumpet Tune in D - have a friend who uses this regularly   Beginning (or ending) of Mendelssohn's Sonata in A - sounds like a good idea, although I've never done this   Recessional:   Mendelssohn - of course   Dubois' Toccata in G - nice and lively   Widor - of course   Marcello's "Let the Heavens Declare" - had a request for this from a priest once   Beethoven's Hymn to Joy   I know I've done and heard other things, but these are what come to mind right now (short of "Send in the Clowns" for the seating of the mothers (in-law)).   Other suggestions, anyone? Along with Shirley, I too am interested in Dr. Moyer's suggestions.   Regards,     Glenda Sutton    
(back) Subject: July 4 music From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com> Date: Thu, 21 May 1998 20:16:39 -0500   I'm trying to compile a list of some suitable music for July 4 service preludes/postludes/other.   A few ideas:   Stars and Stripes Forever - I know Biggs did an arrangement of this, which I have   Star-Spangled Banner, theme and variations - I believe this is by John Bull (I have this also)   Eugene Thayer's Fugue from the Sonata #2 - take off on "America" (have to buy this one); apparently he also wrote a theme and variations for "The Star-Spangled Banner" in this sonata also(?)   Any other suggestions?   Glenda Sutton      
(back) Subject: Re: July 4 music From: Stephen F P Karr <karrlist@scescape.net> Date: Thu, 21 May 1998 22:38:54 -0300 (EST)   Hi-   Got to put my $.02 in, so here goes.   Ives: Variations on "America" Buck: Variations on "The Star Spangled Banner" Paine: Concert Variations on "The Star Spangled Banner" Paine: Doppel Fugue ober "Heil dir im Siegeskranz" (excuse my German, but I speak French)   or if you want to switch texts,   Reger: Variations and Fugue on "God Save the Queen"   On last July 4th, the choir of St. Paul's Episcopal, Augusta, GA gave a concert (interspersed with patriotic numbers on the organ) with many patriotic songs and such. My teacher (Keith Shafer, Director of Music there) played the first two, after the audience had sung the tunes. There was one more piece that he played, by some man whose name escapes me at the moment, that was "The Battle of Trenton." This composer was one of the many who claimed Yankee Doodle as his own, and was also the organist at this very St. Paul's where the concert took place. I believe that the arrangement of this (for it was originally for piano and poster-changer) was by Biggs. I'd appreciate it if someone could supply the name.   Also, I imagine any Sousa march would be well received (or any American march, for that matter).   -Stephen    
(back) Subject: Re: July 4 music From: Shirley <pnst@itw.com> Date: Thu, 21 May 1998 20:25:08   At 20:16 05/21/98 -0500, you wrote:   > >Star-Spangled Banner, theme and variations - I believe this is by John Bull >(I have this also)   The Fox arrangement of this is in a collection I have.   > >Eugene Thayer's Fugue from the Sonata #2 - take off on "America" (have to >buy this one);   And then there's the Ives..... :)   Can always adapt the Wilhousky "Battle Hymn"....   I used to play every year on July 4th weekend.... haven't in a while, though. When I did, I'd improvise on "America the Beautiful" for the prelude.   -Shirley  
(back) Subject: Re: July 4 music From: "Bonnie Beth Derby" <orge@dreamscape.com> Date: Thu, 21 May 1998 21:51:25 -0400   Hi Glenda,   One selection that I have used on the 4th of July is the Prelude on ``America'' by Flor Peeters. It is very short - one page in length and not difficult to play. I usually play it twice: first `mp' and second `f'. It is contained in the ``Thirty short preludes on well-known hymns for organ'', Op. 95 -- edition Peters No. 6195.   Regards,   Bonnie Beth Derby orge@dreamscape.com   ---------- > From: Glenda <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com> > To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> > Subject: July 4 music > Date: Thursday, May 21, 1998 9:16 PM > > I'm trying to compile a list of some suitable music for July 4 service > preludes/postludes/other. > > A few ideas: > > Stars and Stripes Forever - I know Biggs did an arrangement of this, which > I have > > Star-Spangled Banner, theme and variations - I believe this is by John Bull > (I have this also) > > Eugene Thayer's Fugue from the Sonata #2 - take off on "America" (have to > buy this one); apparently he also wrote a theme and variations for "The > Star-Spangled Banner" in this sonata also(?) > > Any other suggestions? > > Glenda Sutton > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: Re: July 4 music From: "Bonnie Beth Derby" <orge@dreamscape.com> Date: Thu, 21 May 1998 21:52:52 -0400   Hi Stephen   The composer is James hewitt.   Bonnie Beth Derby orge@dreamscape.com   ---------- > From: Stephen F P Karr <karrlist@scescape.net> > To: PipeChat <pipechat@pipechat.org> > Subject: Re: July 4 music > Date: Thursday, May 21, 1998 9:38 PM > > Hi- > > Got to put my $.02 in, so here goes. > > Ives: Variations on "America" > Buck: Variations on "The Star Spangled Banner" > Paine: Concert Variations on "The Star Spangled Banner" > Paine: Doppel Fugue ober "Heil dir im Siegeskranz" (excuse my German, but I > speak French) > > or if you want to switch texts, > > Reger: Variations and Fugue on "God Save the Queen" > > On last July 4th, the choir of St. Paul's Episcopal, Augusta, GA gave a > concert (interspersed with patriotic numbers on the organ) with many > patriotic songs and such. My teacher (Keith Shafer, Director of Music > there) played the first two, after the audience had sung the tunes. There > was one more piece that he played, by some man whose name escapes me at the > moment, that was "The Battle of Trenton." This composer was one of the many > who claimed Yankee Doodle as his own, and was also the organist at this very > St. Paul's where the concert took place. I believe that the arrangement of > this (for it was originally for piano and poster-changer) was by Biggs. I'd > appreciate it if someone could supply the name. > > Also, I imagine any Sousa march would be well received (or any American > march, for that matter). > > -Stephen > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: Re: July 4 music From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com> Date: Thu, 21 May 1998 20:56:28 -0500   Stephen Karr suggested:   > Ives: Variations on "America" > Buck: Variations on "The Star Spangled Banner" > Paine: Concert Variations on "The Star Spangled Banner" > Paine: Doppel Fugue ober "Heil dir im Siegeskranz" (excuse my German, but I > speak French) > > or if you want to switch texts, > > Reger: Variations and Fugue on "God Save the Queen"   One reason I asked for this info is that I got the crazy idea to maybe do a short concert before the town's fireworks that night. I don't know that I will do it, but I am interested in everyone's suggestions. Besides, the editor of the AGO chapter newsletter has now asked if I might list the responses. Who knows, if you suggest something, you might become famous!   Thanks,   Glenda Sutton    
(back) Subject: Stanley From: Jenny Moon <bfus7@central.susx.ac.uk> Date: Fri, 22 May 1998 03:21:46 BST     Hi   Is there a book/s containing the full organ works by John Stanley. I'm particularly looking for the trumpet volantary.   Jen.      
(back) Subject: Re: July 4 music From: Stanley Lowkis <nstarfil@mediaone.net> Date: Thu, 21 May 1998 22:37:28 -0400   Glenda wrote:   > One reason I asked for this info is that I got the crazy idea to maybe do a > short concert before the town's fireworks that night. I don't know that I > will do it, but I am interested in everyone's suggestions. Besides, the > editor of the AGO chapter newsletter has now asked if I might list the > responses. Who knows, if you suggest something, you might become famous! > > Thanks, > > Glenda Sutton >   James Hewitt (1770-1827) wrote a number of concert pieces.   One that I enjoy listening to is titled: The Fourth of July ("A Grand Military Sonata")   It runs about 9 minutes I own a Richard Ellsasser LP titled "Yankee Organ Music" with this as well as some other pieces.   E.P. Biggs recorded some interesting, seldom performed works from the Colonial period on an LP titled "The Organ in America"   I hope that this is of help,   Stan Lowkis Ipswich, MA  
(back) Subject: Re: July 4 music From: Stephen F P Karr <karrlist@scescape.net> Date: Thu, 21 May 1998 23:37:46 -0300 (EST)   Hi-   Thanks a bunch for sending me that. That composer's name was driving me further insane than I already am :)   Thanks again,   -Stephen    
(back) Subject: Re: Ahlborn Module Question From: RSiegel920 <RSiegel920@aol.com> Date: Thu, 21 May 1998 22:44:50 EDT   Have seen prices ranging all the way between $2000.00 and $2800.00  
(back) Subject: Re: July 4 music From: sohmer@juno.com Date: Thu, 21 May 1998 22:59:45 -0400   All these mahv'lus 'gestions on farth o jooolie meyousick.   Here's a charmer for y'all but not to be played south of the mason dixon line:   Charles W. Ore's setting of "Mine Eyes Have Seen the Glory"   If you play it in the south, simply entitle: "John Brown's Body Lies A Mouldrin' in the Grave"     Firecracks to y'all.   Steve Ohmer   _____________________________________________________________________ You don't need to buy Internet access to use free Internet e-mail. Get completely free e-mail from Juno at http://www.juno.com Or call Juno at (800) 654-JUNO [654-5866]  
(back) Subject: Re: The Silence of the Typing Hands. From: Kevin Cartwright <kevin1@alaweb.com> Date: Thu, 21 May 1998 22:08:02 -0500   bruce cornely wrote: > > Ah Kevin, > You have learned that there is a time and a place for everything, and > the wry "cybergrin" tells me that "thou knowest when and how to be > wonderfully EVIL L L L L". You're learning fast! > Your church must be in an upper-middle class neighborhood. POOR people > certainly could not afford to spill cocaine. Hmmm. I wonder how they > would react to a mixture of cocaine and dog-pee??   (tee-hee-hee) I was at church the other night and my mother was eventually 30 minutes late to pick me up. I wanted to wait outside so she wouldn't think she had already left...but it was after 9:00 p.m. I stayed outside for about two minutes until the "people" gathered on the church terrace again. I then went back inside (locking the door behind myself) and hoped my mother was late enough to miss "the act." I thought playing the organ would run them off, but I heard them yelling at each other from outside for a while after I finished the piece.   So, about 5 minutes before my mother got there, they seemed to have finished and left. BTW, it is an upper-middle class area. BUT, the "Methodist Hill" area is a LOW class area (mostly condemned housing that is still being used) that surrounds the "good part" in the shape of an L. Those people don't want to make their neighborhood look worse (or have their parents catch them dealing in the front yard), so they come to the nice part and ruin it's after-hours reputation. I guess the buyers come from somewhere else. There weren't any familiar voices asking the questions that night (but there were some familiar voices naming the price).   Anyway,   Kevin C. kevin1@alaweb.com    
(back) Subject: Re: July 4 music From: Bob Loesch <rrloesch@jps.net> Date: Thu, 21 May 1998 20:16:45 -0700   At 20:16 5/21/98 -0500, you wrote: >I'm trying to compile a list of some suitable music for July 4 service >preludes/postludes/other.   What about Charles Ives' "Variations on America"? That would wake up the congregation. (and the dead!)     Regards,   Bob        
(back) Subject: Re: Entreat me not to leave thee From: "Karl E. Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersv.edu> Date: Thu, 21 May 1998 23:27:18 -0400 (EDT)     One needs to be careful when making claims about the background of a given piece of music as a factor in its worthiness. Lots os music intended for use in one context has found valuable use in another. That a given work comes from opera or popular culture has little bearing on its value within the life of the Church. What's more, people do not agree on just how "narrow" is the range of acceptable expression, and I can't define any such range here to everyone's satisfaction!!   But, case in point: the chorale melody for "O Welt, ich muss dich lassen" came from a secular piece by Isaak "Innsbruck, ich muss dich lassen" in a day when chorale tunes were needed and thus taken from any source. What's more, the division between "sacred" and "secular" was not as pronounce then as now. So, it's not the same as the practice some 40 - 45 years ago when "Now Is the Hour" was made into a sacred song, "_______ Me, O Lord." We no longer have the need that existed when Isaak's tune was taken into sacred use, but we DO sense a greater division between the sacred and thje secular--and thus greater trouble in taking secular tunes and underlaying sacred texts to them as _contrafacta_.   I think so much of the issue rests on #1 understanding the function of the Church as God's work, not ours; #2 texts and asssociated music that both focuses toward God as its own expression and helps people to focus similarly, as opposed to music that "entertains" people or texts that actually discuss human relations et al. God is interested in our relationships with each other, of course, but that's not a reason to carry on love songs in worship settigns. #3 more careful consideration as to how any given text or tune actually is perceived by the people as per my earlier comment that the biblical basis of "Entreat thee not to leave me" is no guarantee whatsoever of its worthiness in weddings. To put this together: it's entirely likely that tunes from opera or secular sources can be more useful *in today's culture* in focusing toward God than are certain biblical texts. The music from a Handel opera set to the text "Thanks Be To Thee" that someone assigned to it will give today's "average" worshiper no sense of secular or inappropriate background or connotation and thus *at least on that account* can be used as fully appropriate.   Thanks for your kindly introductory comment on my earlier message.   Cordially,   Karl   On Thu, 21 May 1998, Shirley wrote:   > Karl wrote, in a well-thought-out response: > > >5. Love songs belong at the reception, not in a church wedding. A > >wedding in a rose garden et al would not have this consideration, of > >course. > > So, Karl, so much of wedding music is from opera and "popular" culture... > what do *you* use in your repertoire, in order to keep the wedding service > of worship just that, worship? What do you suggest to vocalists? > > --Shirley > > PS - sorry for the delay in response to this... have been offline since > Sunday. > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >    
(back) Subject: Re: July 4 music From: kwkeller@juno.com (KARL W KELLER) Date: Thu, 21 May 1998 23:23:31 -0400   I am much interested on how Glenda (and maybe others) will pull off an organ concert on July 4th just before the fireworks. The 4th is on Saturday this year and I just can't picture an organ concert which would attract a large audience.   Karl Musica est Dei donum optimi     Glenda wrote:   One reason I asked for this info is that I got the crazy idea to maybe do a short concert before the town's fireworks that night. I don't know that I will do it, but I am interested in everyone's suggestions. Besides, the editor of the AGO chapter newsletter has now asked if I might list the responses. Who knows, if you suggest something, you might become famous! Thanks, Glenda Sutton   _____________________________________________________________________ You don't need to buy Internet access to use free Internet e-mail. Get completely free e-mail from Juno at http://www.juno.com Or call Juno at (800) 654-JUNO [654-5866]  
(back) Subject: Re: July 4 music From: "Karl E. Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersv.edu> Date: Thu, 21 May 1998 23:37:03 -0400 (EDT)     Churches who observe a theological sense often called the doctrine of the two kingdoms will thoroughly disapprove of any such music or such patriotic songs by the congregation. It's worth a careful check with the pastor to get a sense of the theological underpining of the church in question.   Lutherans and perhaps Roman Catholics might be chief among those who maintain this two-kingdoms doctrine. Thus it is, for example, that _Lutheran Book of Worship_ consigns "God Of Our Fathers," "My Country, 'Tis of Thee," "God Bless Our Native Land" and the British --or perhaps more specificlaly Canadian?--national anthem is a section at the back of the hymnal, clearly separate from "hymns" and marked "National Songs." The United State national anthem is not in the book at all.   Cordially,   Dr. Karl E. Moyer Lancaster PA   On Thu, 21 May 1998, Glenda wrote:   > I'm trying to compile a list of some suitable music for July 4 service > preludes/postludes/other. > > A few ideas: > > Stars and Stripes Forever - I know Biggs did an arrangement of this, which > I have > > Star-Spangled Banner, theme and variations - I believe this is by John Bull > (I have this also) > > Eugene Thayer's Fugue from the Sonata #2 - take off on "America" (have to > buy this one); apparently he also wrote a theme and variations for "The > Star-Spangled Banner" in this sonata also(?) > > Any other suggestions? > > Glenda Sutton > > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >    
(back) Subject: How does an organ get me across town? (X-posted and more) From: Kevin Cartwright <kevin1@alaweb.com> Date: Thu, 21 May 1998 22:32:31 -0500   The above subject (How does an organ get me across town?) refers to my mother's question of pipe organ vs. automobile. So, I went to the state auction and came home in a 1993 Chevrolet Lumina (Euro model) with just over 40k miles. PERFECT condition, must have been assigned to someone who knew how to take care of their state vehicle. Mostly highway miles on it anyway.   So, I spent $3,500 on the car, and I need a tire balanced. That leaves me with a nice sum (or should I say 'difference') to pay for auto insurance and my 2/3 Wicks, and my mother has to find another excuse to keep an organ out of the house. I seem to be getting lucky: a 2/3 Wicks for $1,500, an Estey reed organ (mint condition) for $250, a car for $3,500, 12 Bourdons w/chest for $300, and a wonderful electronic theatre organ for $800 has appeared on the financial and/or wish list. What's next??   Anyway, finished boasting for now...   Kevin Cartwright kevin1@alaweb.com    
(back) Subject: Re: How does an organ get me across town? (X-posted and more) From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Fri, 22 May 1998 01:28:58 -0400   Kevin asks...   >What's next?   A couple of weeks in the islands would be nice. There are some wonderful organs in the Bahamas!   bruce o h s __________ a g o cornely o o __________ o o ........... cremona84000@webtv.net ...........