PipeChat Digest #578 - Wednesday, November 4, 1998
 
Carpal Tunnel Syndrome
  by "Bud" <budchris@earthlink.net>
RE: Carpal Tunnel Syndrome
  by "Dennis Goward" <dgoward@uswest.net>
RE: Carpal Tunnel Syndrome
  by "Susan Weaver" <weaversm@centum.utulsa.edu>
RE: Carpal Tunnel Syndrome
  by "Clarice Jane Snyder" <snyder@skyenet.net>
Re: Carpal Tunnel Syndrome
  by <Myosotis51@aol.com>
Looking for Mark Huth from Rodgers  (X-Posted)
  by "Richard Schneider" <arpncorn@davesworld.net>
Looking for Wurlitzer reed windchest. (X-posted)
  by "Ken Evans" <kevans1@rochester.rr.com>
Position Available
  by "Bud" <budchris@earthlink.net>
RE: Carpal Tunnel Syndrome
  by "William Coale" <wcoale@tir.com>
The Role of Organ Teachers
  by "Bud" <budchris@earthlink.net>
Bud?  Could you please re-post your French Classical reigistration guid?
  by "Charles Krug" <cdkrug@worldnet.att.net>
Re: The Role of Organ Teachers
  by <RMc7832619@aol.com>
Re: The Role of Organ Teachers
  by <GRSCoLVR@aol.com>
Re: Position Available
  by "Karl E. Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersv.edu>
Re: Position Available
  by <GRSCoLVR@aol.com>
Re: Position Available
  by "Mark Hopper" <mahopper@bellsouth.net>
Ringing the Changes!
  by <ManderUSA@aol.com>
 


(back) Subject: Carpal Tunnel Syndrome From: Bud <budchris@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 03 Nov 1998 07:25:04 -0800   Carpal Tunnel Syndrome is indeed a VERY real disease. I had surgery for it in November of 1992, went back to work in February of 1993, and became "permanently" disabled in June of 1993. It was THREE YEARS before I could use a computer or play the organ again. I do NOT recommend having the surgery unless one becomes TOTALLY incapacitated. Better to avoid it altogether in the first place by having ergonomically-correct computer stations and cultivating good practice habits. Remember, carpal tunnel is caused by repetitive motions ... take frequent breaks, be sure you have a wrist rest on your computer, etc. I DON'T think in my case it resulted primarly from playing the organ, but rather from poorly-designed fixed-keyboard computer stations at work; but the combination of the two (I was practicing 6-8 hours on Saturday, playing 3 services on Sunday, in addition to working 40 hours a week at a computer job) did me in. The MINUTE you experience symptoms (numbness in the fingers, pain in the forearm, tremors), find a GOOD orthopedist.   Cheers,   Bud    
(back) Subject: RE: Carpal Tunnel Syndrome From: "Dennis Goward" <dgoward@uswest.net> Date: Tue, 3 Nov 1998 10:22:54 -0700   > Carpal Tunnel Syndrome is indeed a VERY real disease.   At the risk of sounding like a "me, too", I'll have to second this.   I had trouble with CTS in both wrists. At the time I was under VA care, so the treatment was conservative (read "cheap") and surgery was not offered.   I took to wearing braces at night, but the biggest help was getting one of those "natural" keyboards for the PC. That's all I use now, and in spite of full time work as a programmer plus off-hours computer use, I have no problems now. Plus I type faster and more accuretln, er accurately. Less errers -- :-0   You can get a decent ortho keyboard for around $40 or so. It's the best piece of computer hardware I ever bought.   Dennis Goward    
(back) Subject: RE: Carpal Tunnel Syndrome From: Susan Weaver <weaversm@centum.utulsa.edu> Date: Tue, 03 Nov 1998 11:38:57 -0600   Generalizations, as a rule, are problematic, IMHO. I, too, have/had an ongoing problem with CTS. Several years ago I had surgery on one hand. They did the endoscopic surgery, and, while my recovery took considerably longer than I was led to believe (it was a full year before I felt fully back to normal) for me surgery was quite helpful. At the time, the doctor wanted to go ahead and do surgery on the other hand, but I wasn't convinced. It's been 6 years or so, and I haven't changed my lifestyle one bit. I type for a living and play piano and organ daily. About a year ago I started having CTS symptoms again and now sleep with both hands in braces and use an ergonomic keyboard for computer work and typing. Both the braces and the keyboard make a world of difference for me. I would hesitate to suggest to anyone that either having or not having the surgery was right for them. One must look at each individual circumstance differently. For me, surgery was the right thing to do on the one hand, and using non-invasive therapy the right thing for the other. If having surgery a second time on my right hand ended up necessary in order for me to maintain my lifestyle, I would not hesitate at all to do it. If you love to play the organ and you can't feel your fingers anymore, which is better--surgery with an extended limited recovery that makes your life more enjoyable in the long run, or go sit in the pews with the congregation? I CAN'T stop playing music. It's my life.  
(back) Subject: RE: Carpal Tunnel Syndrome From: Clarice Jane Snyder <snyder@skyenet.net> Date: Tue, 03 Nov 1998 12:47:43 -0600   An alternative treatment in chiropractic. I go to the ones who do the "activation" method which may be hard to find. They don't do any twisting, pulling etc. They use what I call a "punch" device and punch just the places that need adjustment. I've have shoulder, neck and arm and hand problems for a long time and know that I wouldn't be playing at all if it weren't for those treatments. When my fingers start getting numb or I can feel it in the wrist the chiropractor uses the punch on my fingertips and all the joints in my hand and at the wrist and elbow and I'm back to normal again. A couple of years ago I couldn't move my Right arm at all the morning of a choir concert that I was to accompany. A treatment at noon meant that I could play that night and it was pain free as well. At 10:22 AM 11/3/98 -0700, you wrote: >> Carpal Tunnel Syndrome is indeed a VERY real disease. > >At the risk of sounding like a "me, too", I'll have to second this. >   ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Clarice Jane Snyder mailto:snyder@skyenet.net Web pages: (Music) http://www.geocities.com/Vienna/2059 (Genealogy) http://www.familytreemaker.com/users/s/n/y/Clarice-J-Snyder Harrison County, Indiana http://www.rootsweb.com/~inharris/surname.html See the above for my Shenandoah Valley VA, Washington Co.TN-NC, Harrison, Floyd, Crawford Co. IN and Meade Co, KY surnames.  
(back) Subject: Re: Carpal Tunnel Syndrome From: Myosotis51@aol.com Date: Tue, 3 Nov 1998 12:42:17 EST   In a message dated 11/3/98 12:18:58 PM Eastern Standard Time, dgoward@uswest.net writes:   << Carpal Tunnel Syndrome is indeed a VERY real disease. At the risk of sounding like a "me, too", I'll have to second this. I had trouble with CTS in both wrists. At the time I was under VA care, so the treatment was conservative (read "cheap") and surgery was not offered. I took to wearing braces at night, but the biggest help was getting one of those "natural" keyboards for the PC. That's all I use now, and in spite of full time work as a programmer plus off-hours computer use, I have no problems now. Plus I type faster and more accuretln, er accurately. Less errers -- :-0 You can get a decent ortho keyboard for around $40 or so. It's the best piece of computer hardware I ever bought. Dennis Goward >>     I've found another gadget very helpful: a trackball instead of a mouse. And don't forget the neoprene wrist rests!!!   Vicki Ceruti  
(back) Subject: Looking for Mark Huth from Rodgers (X-Posted) From: Richard Schneider <arpncorn@davesworld.net> Date: Tue, 03 Nov 1998 12:03:42 -0600   Good morning, lists.   I need to get in touch with Mark Huth from Rodgers Instrument Corporation. I need to get some information in order to solve a technical problem with one of their instruments.   Could someone EMAIL me privately with his address, or, Mark, if you read this, please get in touch with me ASAP?   Thanks! Faithfully,   Richard Schneider, President SCHNEIDER PIPE ORGANS, Inc. Kenney, IL 61749-0137 (217) 944-2454 VOX (217) 944-2527 FAX mailto: arpncorn@davesworld.net EMAIL  
(back) Subject: Looking for Wurlitzer reed windchest. (X-posted) From: "Ken Evans" <kevans1@rochester.rr.com> Date: Tue, 3 Nov 1998 14:07:22 -0500   The Rochester Theater Organ Society is looking for a Wurlitzer 2-rank reed chest suitable for a vox and a brass saxophone ranks. We are about to replace the brass saxophone rank that was "liberated' from the instrument while it was still in the RKO Palace Theater but we need a suitable chest to make that possible. If you have (or know of one) that's available we would appreciate a private response.   Thank you, Ken Evans-RTOS Director    
(back) Subject: Position Available From: Bud <budchris@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 03 Nov 1998 15:23:01 -0800   An open position was just posted on one of the lists ... nice organ and facilities, desirable area. It contained the following:   "salary mid $20s, master's degree preferred (!!!)"   Hello! I respectfully suggest that the church posting that notice investigate what public school teachers are making these days, with or without a master's.   Regards,   Bud the Growly Old Organ Bear    
(back) Subject: RE: Carpal Tunnel Syndrome From: "William Coale" <wcoale@tir.com> Date: Tue, 3 Nov 1998 18:19:50 -0500   After years of keyboard/clarinet/computer work, I had trouble with CT in my left hand. I was fortunate enough to find an MD who was involved in a study of repetitive-motion disorders in assembly line workers at a local Michigan GM plant. The solution: LASER! I went to a commercial therapy facility (the only one in Michigan with the laser treatment), and after about 5 sessions, I was improved enough to require no additional treatment. Strength in my hand DOUBLED after only one treatment. It might be worth asking doctors in your area about this regiment, especially as a way to perhaps avoid surgery.   Bill near GM-town (Flint) MI    
(back) Subject: The Role of Organ Teachers From: Bud <budchris@earthlink.net> Date: Tue, 03 Nov 1998 18:21:12 -0800   A question was asked on one of the lists about the proper role of organ teachers. OK, here goes:   Live in the real world.   The only preparation that matters in the year of grace 1999 is for an eclectic church position requiring the "Compleat Musician" ... everything from praise choruses with electronic combos to major oratorios, and everything in between.   No one makes a living playing organ recitals; few make a living teaching organ; the vast majority of jobs are in churches, where they've always been.   Teach practical repertoire.   I didn't discover the smaller Reger pieces (the Chorale Preludes in particular) until I was out of school. The Bach chorale preludes (large and small) are infinitely more useful than most of the preludes and fugues. And in my day (1962-65), Oberlin skipped right from Franck to Messiaen. Hello! What about Widor, Vierne, Tournemire, Langlais, etc.? Well, they DID teach the Dupre Preludes and Fugues, but not Dupre's liturgical organ music, of which there's a great stack.   TEACH SERVICE PLAYING AND IMPROVISATION (bold italics underlined).   Time and again, I've sat to hear auditions as a member of the Archdiocesan Music Commission. When I've asked a candidate seeking certification to modulate to the key of G from wherever they are, I get blank stares. Ditto transposing hymns to lower keys. Ditto improvising free harmonizations for hymns. Ditto improvising accompaniments for melody lines. Ditto reading Gregorian notation (and yes, it still has its uses, as a basis for improvisation, if nothing else.)   Teach choral directing and voice techniques.   Most of us can barely eke out a living in a combined position. Having the choral credentials increase your chance of getting a half-way decent job.   Teach computer desktop music publishing, sequencing, etc.   The time is fast approaching when every musician is going to have to know the ins and outs of MIDI, and of Finale (or something similar).   TEACH LITURGY.   You can't do the new liturgy well unless you know where it came from.   And, oh, did I mention starting at Hymn #1 in whatever hymnal and going straight through it, putting the soprano on a separate manual, the tenor an octave higher as a descant, the soprano in the pedal, etc. etc. etc.?   And sight-reading, figured bass, rock-solid technique, good taste, a thorough knowledge of organ-building?   It's a life-long process.   Something else: when I changed schools to do a master's, I was SHOCKED, absolutely SHOCKED to find that my new school had a very aggressive job placement program. How many do?   Well, guess it's time to don my asbestos cassock and surplice (grin).   Regards,   Bud Clark St. Matthew's-in-the-Shopping-Center Newport Beach CA USA    
(back) Subject: Bud? Could you please re-post your French Classical reigistration guid? From: "Charles Krug" <cdkrug@worldnet.att.net> Date: Tue, 3 Nov 1998 21:20:31 -0500   I deleted mine before I thought to print it.   Thanx     Charles    
(back) Subject: Re: The Role of Organ Teachers From: RMc7832619@aol.com Date: Tue, 3 Nov 1998 21:25:59 EST   I am SHOCKED at your wonderful start to what I hope is a long running thread! Thanks for your effort. I feel I must move you to my list of over achievers! :)   Roger  
(back) Subject: Re: The Role of Organ Teachers From: GRSCoLVR@aol.com Date: Tue, 3 Nov 1998 21:52:27 EST   Bud-- Thanks for a wonderful start on what I hope , as well , is a long running thread.... (disregarding the no-no's on the Me-Too's )   Cheers, Roc  
(back) Subject: Re: Position Available From: "Karl E. Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersv.edu> Date: Tue, 3 Nov 1998 22:04:47 -0500 (EST)   The position lists 1248 hours per year. What with 4 weeks of vacation, those hours divide over 48 weeks into 26 hours pwer week. Is a mid-$20,000's out or range for such duties in a rural state like Vermont?   Karl E. Moyer Lancaster PA On Tue, 3 Nov 1998, Bud wrote:   > An open position was just posted on one of the lists ... nice organ and > facilities, desirable area. It contained the following: > > "salary mid $20s, master's degree preferred (!!!)" > > Hello! I respectfully suggest that the church posting that notice > investigate what public school teachers are making these days, with or > without a master's. > > Regards, > > Bud the Growly Old Organ Bear > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >    
(back) Subject: Re: Position Available From: GRSCoLVR@aol.com Date: Tue, 3 Nov 1998 22:14:51 EST   Hi List-- In response to K. Moyer's assessment of the hours versus the pay versus the organist versus the teacher,,,I observe the following-- most teachers that this ole man knows only work 180 days per year,,,,,thats 26 weeks,,,the required amount of school, at least in New Jersey where I hail from. So,,,, 1248 hours(organist time) divided into 26 weeks gives one the answer of 48 hours per week,,,,as a comparison on the "teaching" basis. I dont know of any teacher,,,not even those right out of school that makes the paltry sum of say 25K per year, which was stated for the organist position. The comment "masters preferred" adds insult to injury IMHO.   Cheers, Roc  
(back) Subject: Re: Position Available From: "Mark Hopper" <mahopper@bellsouth.net> Date: Tue, 3 Nov 1998 22:50:07 -0600   As a starting high school music teacher in the Public Schools of North Carolina, my salary was $20,100 annually. Now I'm working on a Master's Degree in church music and am planning to begin a full-time career in sacred music.   Imagine that--going into church music and actually being excited about the salary!!!   And yes--I am lamenting the plight of teachers. -----Original Message----- From: GRSCoLVR@aol.com <GRSCoLVR@aol.com> To: pipechat@pipechat.org <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: Tuesday, November 03, 1998 9:18 PM Subject: Re: Position Available     >Hi List-- >In response to K. Moyer's assessment of the hours versus the pay versus the >organist versus the teacher,,,I observe the following-- >most teachers that this ole man knows only work 180 days per year,,,,,thats 26 >weeks,,,the required amount of school, at least in New Jersey where I hail >from. >So,,,, 1248 hours(organist time) divided into 26 weeks gives one the answer >of 48 hours per week,,,,as a comparison on the "teaching" basis. I dont know >of any teacher,,,not even those right out of school that makes the paltry sum >of say 25K per year, which was stated for the organist position. The comment >"masters preferred" adds insult to injury IMHO. > >Cheers, >Roc > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >    
(back) Subject: Ringing the Changes! From: ManderUSA@aol.com Date: Wed, 4 Nov 1998 01:58:49 EST   Forwarded to the list by Judy Ollikkala, in reference to changes to the organ in St. George's School Chapel, Newport, RI   << Additions: Restored pipework: Tuba 8' [Skinner, from Grace Church, New York, 12" WP] Gt. First Diapason [Hinners] Sw. Vox Humana [Aeolian residence organ] Ch. Clarinet [old Wicks] New Pipework: Gt. Harmonic Flute Gt. Tierce (Principal) Swell Mixture III [Skinner C-14 style]   Deletions: Gt. Scharff Ch. Cromorne Gt. Hohlflote Sw Clairon 4 >>   In Microcosm, a fascinating look at at least one direction in which organ tastes are moving. Add a Tuba, remove a Scharff, add a Clarinet, remove a Cromorne, add a First Open Diapason, add an Harmonic Flute and Vox Humana. One of the virtues of living as long as I have is, I guess, having seen at least a couple of these mood swings, and I know for a fact that Grace Church, New York, would now love to have that Tuba back, and the whole incredible organ to go with it!   Cheers,   Malcolm Wechsler N. P. Mander, Ltd. - U. S. A. - we even built a NEW French Horn for Princeton!!