PipeChat Digest #582 - Friday, November 6, 1998
 
Re: Part-Time Position, Salaries, etc.
  by <RSiegel920@aol.com>
Re: Part-Time Position, Salaries, etc.
  by "Jim Leworthy" <jgl0@theatreorgans.com>
Re: Unions - Are Pipe builders unionized?
  by "robert.cowley" <robert.cowley@mci2000.com>
Re: Unions - Are Pipe builders unionized?
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@truelink.net>
Re: Unions - Are Pipe builders unionized?
  by "Jon C. Habermaas" <opus1100@ameritech.net>
National Saxophone Day today
  by <ComposerTX@aol.com>
Re: National Saxophone Day today
  by "Bud" <budchris@earthlink.net>
An Old Theatre Organ
  by "Richard Pinel" <rpinel@theatreorgans.com>
Re: National Saxophone Day today
  by "Robert  Eversman" <highnote@mhtc.net>
Contemporary worship, Taize
  by "Bud" <budchris@earthlink.net>
Time Travelling
  by "Dennis Goward" <dgoward@uswest.net>
Re: Time Travelling
  by "Bob Conway" <conwayb@post.queensu.ca>
Re: Time Travelling
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@truelink.net>
Organs made with non traditional materials
  by <jorge.gomez@nuclenor.es>
Re: Time Travelling
  by <GRSCoLVR@aol.com>
Re: Time Travelling
  by "Dennis Goward" <dgoward@uswest.net>
Re: Organs made with non traditional materials
  by "Michael Wong x4241" <michael@galaxy.nsc.com>
Re: Organs made with non traditional materials
  by "V. David Barton" <vdbarton@erols.com>
Re: Organs made with non traditional materials
  by <Afreed0904@aol.com>
Re: Organs made with non traditional materials
  by "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com>
Re: Organs made with non traditional materials
  by "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com>
Another Atlantic City broadcast - maybe
  by "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com>
Re: Organs made with non traditional materials
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@truelink.net>
ADMINISTRATIVE POSTING
  by "Administrator" <admin@pipechat.org>
Re: Organs made with non traditional materials
  by <Afreed0904@aol.com>
Part-Time Position, Salaries, etc.
  by <KriderSM@aol.com>
Re: Time Travelling
  by "Aida van de Brake" <Aida@cable.A2000.nl>
 


(back) Subject: Re: Part-Time Position, Salaries, etc. From: RSiegel920@aol.com Date: Fri, 6 Nov 1998 06:05:25 EST   In a message dated 11/5/98 3:53:34 PM Central Standard Time, desertbob@truelink.net writes:   << Ah..an attorney! Well, there we go! >> There we go where? R. J. Siegel, J.D., Ph. D.  
(back) Subject: Re: Part-Time Position, Salaries, etc. From: "Jim Leworthy" <jgl0@theatreorgans.com> Date: Fri, 06 Nov 1998 07:16:45 -0500   On 05/11/98, at 1:04 PM, Jim Swist wrote:   >Without taking sides on the issue of organized labor, I would point >out that there are cases where musicians are highly unionized >(Broadway pit orchestras are alomst 100% union). The musicians make >a living wage (believe it or not) and the "management' doesn't seem >to be about to replace them with recorded music.   ......except at Radio City Music Hall.....etc.   Jim      
(back) Subject: Re: Unions - Are Pipe builders unionized? From: "robert.cowley" <robert.cowley@mci2000.com> Date: Fri, 06 Nov 1998 09:03:03 -0500   Due to the Union, that is exactly why M.P. Moller went out of business!   Bob C.   ---------- > From: JKVDP@aol.com > To: pipechat@pipechat.org > Subject: Re: Unions - Are Pipe builders unionized? > Date: Thursday, November 05, 1998 6:57 PM > > I'm curious, which pipe organ builders are union shops? > Jerry in Seattle > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: Re: Unions - Are Pipe builders unionized? From: Bob Scarborough <desertbob@truelink.net> Date: Fri, 06 Nov 1998 07:10:38 -0800   At 09:03 AM 11/6/98 -0500, robert.cowley wrote:   >Due to the Union, that is exactly why M.P. Moller went out of business!   Oh, come ON! M.P. Moller went out of business for several reasons, and I'm quite sure, like in MOST cases in this country, unionized labor is falsely blamed....again! The big "barn" they operated in was horridly energy inefficient in winter...that post has already made ther rounds. The costs of heating it alone was as prohibitive then as now. Secondly, Moller made a TON of money literally "throwing in" organs of highly questionable quality during the '60s and '70s...and each case of that sullied their reputation, already in decline, to the point of killing off their repeat business to nil. It finally caught up with them during the '70s, as their orders fell to almost zero in comparison to the "glory days". We've learned that the same exact fate met Kilgen in 1960...too much junk, too often, and the potential for sales was killed by bad reputation. You'll remember that Kilgen was a veritable General Motors of organbuilding during the Depression until WWII. After the War, things got kind of dicey for them. By the '50s, Kilgen was doing hardly anything...again, reputation.   I take offense at attempts by those to the right of Genghis Khan to portray working people as the villians in many cases of American business failures. Most times, it IS management! Witness Eastern Airlines....   DeserTBoB    
(back) Subject: Re: Unions - Are Pipe builders unionized? From: "Jon C. Habermaas" <opus1100@ameritech.net> Date: Fri, 06 Nov 1998 09:51:48 -0600   Bob Scarborough wrote: > > At 09:03 AM 11/6/98 -0500, robert.cowley wrote: > > >Due to the Union, that is exactly why M.P. Moller went out of business! > > Oh, come ON! M.P. Moller went out of business for several reasons, and I'm > quite sure, like in MOST cases in this country, unionized labor is falsely > blamed....again!   I totally agree with the response above. It is easy to blame unions and not bad management for failure of companies. I've bitt'n my tongue for two days as to not respond to the union bashing which I believe should never have been addressed on here. I joined this forum to get away from some of the other problems and enjoy discussions about organ related topics. I have been a member of a union for 17 years and had to join it as a condition of employment. I was not pro-union as the time but have since been shown by the actions of the company why a union is important. At present I am not working due to a labor problem after 19 months of meaningless negotiations. The company wrote a new contract and said here it is...at present we are locked out by the company and do not know whether we are ever going back. When you tune into ABC just remember there is some scab technician working behind the scenes to bring you that program. Please drop the Union topics and lets get back to talking about organs and organ related topics.   sincerely,   Jon C. Habermaas  
(back) Subject: National Saxophone Day today From: ComposerTX@aol.com Date: Fri, 6 Nov 1998 10:52:10 EST   Are any of you aware of saxophone stops being included in non-theatre organs? Just curious. Thanks. Danny Ray ComposerTX@AOL.com  
(back) Subject: Re: National Saxophone Day today From: Bud <budchris@earthlink.net> Date: Fri, 06 Nov 1998 08:08:15 -0800   Hi, Danny!   There was a saxophone stop on the Choir organ of the old Lewis and Hitchcock at St. Paul's, K Street in DC (now replaced by a huge Schoenstein ... I don't know WHERE they put all that organ in that little church!). I seem to recall a couple of Esteys with a (reedless?) saxophone stop. The big Skinner in Woolsey Hall at Yale has practically ever reed stop known to man ... do any of you Yalies recall if it has one? I didn't play it long enough to memorize the stop-list ... was only there one summer.   Seems to me that the saxophone stop might have its uses in a medium to medium-large size romantic church or concert hall organ ... I do remember liking the one at St. Paul's ... kind of a woody, hooty sound.   Regards,   Bud Clark   ComposerTX@aol.com wrote:   > Are any of you aware of saxophone stops being included in non-theatre organs? > Just curious. Thanks. > Danny Ray > ComposerTX@AOL.com > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org        
(back) Subject: An Old Theatre Organ From: "Richard Pinel" <rpinel@theatreorgans.com> Date: Thu, 5 Nov 1998 18:19:00 -0000   This is a multi-part message in MIME format.   ------=_NextPart_000_0015_01BE08E8.C2D92C40 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   Hi,   I'm a 14 year old student at an upper school in Northampton, England, = and in our hall is a disintegrating old 3 manual, 7 rank (I think) Peter = Conacher theatre organ (one of 2 in the world I'm told). The head = teacher wants rid of it. I like playing it (despite the bouncy pedal = board, grossly out of tune stops, non-working solo, and accomp manuals) = and don't want to see it go. If anyone knows of a way to have it = restored, and moved somewhere, please could they tell me (I think that = the head teacher will give it away if the "buyer" pays for = transportation) because it would be a shame to see this could-be-fine = instrument go to the dump when the hall is knocked down in several years = time,   Thanks,   Richard Pinel     ------=_NextPart_000_0015_01BE08E8.C2D92C40 Content-Type: text/html; charset="iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable   <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD W3 HTML//EN"> <HTML> <HEAD>   <META content=3Dtext/html;charset=3Diso-8859-1 = http-equiv=3DContent-Type> <META content=3D'"MSHTML 4.72.3110.7"' name=3DGENERATOR> </HEAD> <BODY bgColor=3D#ffffff> <DIV> <P>Hi,</P> <P>I'm a 14 year old student at an upper school in Northampton, England, = and in=20 our hall is a disintegrating old 3 manual, 7 rank (I think) Peter = Conacher=20 theatre organ (one of 2 in the world I'm told). The head teacher wants = rid of=20 it. I like playing it (despite the bouncy pedal board, grossly out of = tune=20 stops, non-working solo, and accomp manuals) and don't want to see it = go. If=20 anyone knows of a way to have it restored, and moved somewhere, please = could=20 they tell me (I think that the head teacher will give it away if the=20 &quot;buyer&quot; pays for transportation) because it would be a shame = to see=20 this could-be-fine instrument go to the dump when the hall is knocked = down in=20 several years time,</P> <P align=3Dcenter>Thanks,</P> <P align=3Dcenter>Richard Pinel</P></DIV></BODY></HTML>   ------=_NextPart_000_0015_01BE08E8.C2D92C40--    
(back) Subject: Re: National Saxophone Day today From: "Robert Eversman" <highnote@mhtc.net> Date: Fri, 6 Nov 1998 10:28:51 -0600   The original E.M. Skinner at the Cathedral of St. John the Divine I believe had a saxophone, imagine how that must have sounded in that vast acoustic! Esp. accompanied by lush Skinner strings.   Here's a new string, if in fact you could be transported in a time machine where would you go? To whom would you want to listen? Why?   I would love to hear Thomas Matthews at St Luke's Evanston IL in the 1950s perform one of his magnificent improves during the offertory. Of course hearing C. Franck is a given.   ---------- > From: ComposerTX@aol.com > To: pipechat@pipechat.org; PIPORG-L@CNSIBM.ALBANY.EDU; theatreorgans-l@theatreorgans.com > Subject: National Saxophone Day today > Date: Friday, November 06, 1998 9:52 AM > > Are any of you aware of saxophone stops being included in non-theatre organs? > Just curious. Thanks. > Danny Ray > ComposerTX@AOL.com > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >  
(back) Subject: Contemporary worship, Taize From: Bud <budchris@earthlink.net> Date: Fri, 06 Nov 1998 08:47:08 -0800   I forget who asked what question where, so I'll combine the two topics ....   I have said before that if liturgy is defined as "the work of the people of God", then let the PEOPLE define the work! And that cuts two ways.   Case in point: St. Michael and All Angels Episcopal Church, Cincinnati, OH ... when I visited there in the '60s, the church was full; there was a large choir, directed by a member of the Conservatory faculty who was also a communicant ... she donated her services; the singers were mostly from the Conservatory ... volunteers. All was in pontifical order in the Sanctuary. The congregation sang "Missa Marialis" with great devotion (it happened I was there on the Feast of the Purification); the choir sang the Gregorian Propers, appropriate motets, and a rousing rendition of "Ye Who Own The Faith of Jesus" during the procession with the candles. There was a lovely supper afterwards in the parish hall. The people were friendly, and they loved their church.   When I returned ten years later to live in Cincinnati, I was stunned. The church was empty; everything was dirty and in disrepair. The choir director and choir were gone; most of the people were gone. What happened?   The rector had turned the altar around, leaving a gaping hole in the lovely and historic carved reredos; he had introduced what at that time was known as the "Green Book" liturgy (which became the basis for the new Book of Common Prayer); he fired the choir director and choir ("too triumphalistic"), all in the name of making the Faith "relevant".   Now, this had been an Anglo-Catholic church for over a hundred years. The people were faithful Christians. Unlike many old Anglo-Catholic parishes who found themselves in changing neighborhoods, St. Michael's had gone out and embraced the neighborhood ... there were Head Start classes, well baby clinics, the Deacon's Pantry, etc. etc. etc. in the '60s ... by the '70s, all that was gone too. There was nobody left to do them.   But the rector had his "relevant" liturgy ... no matter that he had destroyed a thriving parish in the process. Some of his flock transferred to St. Stephen's, Mount Healthy (the other Anglo-Catholic parish in the Cincinnati area), where the rector had the good sense to leave well enough alone; but, sadly, some were so disgusted that they left the church altogether.   Now ... was what the rector of St. Michael's did in the best interest of the souls under his cure? I think not.   When the Anglo-Catholic movement came out of the universities in England, the first place it went was the slums of London. And they went with the full Faith ... no apologies, no dumbing down. To this day, those are some of the (few) flourishing parishes in the Church of England.   When I served at Old St. Mary's RC Church in Cincinnati, there were about 300 people left in the territorial parish ... the church was downtown, in a depressed area. Yet we regularly had over a thousand people at the Latin High Mass, until the Archdiocese suppressed it and imposed the Novus Ordo Missae.   In both the cases cited, nobody asked the PEOPLE what THEY wanted.   Now, having said THAT, IF the desire for contemporary music and worship styles arises from the valid cultural experience of the PEOPLE, then it SHOULD be done. St. Mary's also had an English Mass ... the neighborhood was a mixture of appalachian folks and African-Americans; the music was a mix of Sacred Harp and gospel. But they regularly migrated to the Latin Mass on feast days.   It seems to me there's a lesson to be learned here ...   Taize is probably the best of what's going on in RC church music today .... a good mix of traditional and contemporary styles. But Taize (the place) has a lot going for it ... a gorgeous, reverberant church, crowds of young people, and a large group of very talented instrumentalists. And the crowds of young people are there to experience the VERY traditional contemplative life of the Taize monastic community. That doesn't easily translate to the typical RC parish church.   The first time I ever heard guitars in the Liturgy, it was at the contemplative Benedictine Abbey of Mount Saviour outside Elmyra, New York. The guitars were played softly and very skillfully to accompany the Gregorian chants at Compline (the church had no organ). The monks sang like cloistered Benedictine monks sing; the guitars were quite beautiful ... they improvised instrumental versets in renaissance style between verses of the Office Hymn, etc.   Those of us in mainline churches DO need to look at the phenomenon of the more-or-less non-denominational "super-churches"; but at least in some cases it is just that ... a phenomenon. Los Angeles is dotted with big churches, now empty, that were the centers of various religious movements that swept through the country at various times in this century. To their credit, most of the super-churches share a strong commitment to families, and in most cases to rather traditional theology, if not worship styles. What can we learn from them?   Regards,   Bud Clark    
(back) Subject: Time Travelling From: "Dennis Goward" <dgoward@uswest.net> Date: Fri, 6 Nov 1998 10:14:15 -0700   >Here's a new string, if in fact you could be transported in a time machine >where would you go? To whom would you want to listen? Why?   Put me in the loft next to J. S. Bach. I would love to hear him perform his own works, and to have him explain to me what his reasons were or the meaning of some of his works.   Dennis Goward      
(back) Subject: Re: Time Travelling From: Bob Conway <conwayb@post.queensu.ca> Date: Fri, 06 Nov 1998 12:17:11 -0500   At 10:14 AM 11/6/98 -0700, Dennis Goward wrote: > >Put me in the loft next to J. S. Bach. I would love to hear him perform his >own works, and to have him explain to me what his reasons were or the >meaning of some of his works.   I normally do not send "Me Too" replies, but in this case I will do so! Just imagine, "Johann, do you write music to suit the organ that you are playing"?   "My son, I write music for God!" might be the answer he would give.   So, Dennis, when you book your trip back in time, make that for two of us!   Bob Conway Architecture, in general, is frozen music. Fredrich von Schelling, 1775 1854        
(back) Subject: Re: Time Travelling From: Bob Scarborough <desertbob@truelink.net> Date: Fri, 06 Nov 1998 10:13:19 -0800   At 10:14 AM 11/6/98 -0700, Dennis Goward wrote: >>Here's a new string, if in fact you could be transported in a time machine >>where would you go? To whom would you want to listen? Why? > >Put me in the loft next to J. S. Bach.<snip>   I'm there, too!   DeserTBoB    
(back) Subject: Organs made with non traditional materials From: <jorge.gomez@nuclenor.es> Date: Fri, 06 Nov 98 19:11:44 +0100     I=B4d like to know about organs whoose pipes are made with non traditio= nal materials.     Jorge Gomez =      
(back) Subject: Re: Time Travelling From: GRSCoLVR@aol.com Date: Fri, 6 Nov 1998 13:21:59 EST   Hi list--- I wouldnt go so far back for myself...I would just like to be in the Wanamaker store in the early 60's when Virgil Fox was there playing "Come Sweet Death" mostly on the string organ,,,,100+ ranks of strings shimmering,,and billowing,,,and rolling around the Grand Court was a sound to behold. Needless to say,,the recording didnt do it justice,,,you had to be there,,and I sure would like to be again!. But--as we said in the 60's--"You can't go back"   Regards,   Roc  
(back) Subject: Re: Time Travelling From: "Dennis Goward" <dgoward@uswest.net> Date: Fri, 6 Nov 1998 11:43:17 -0700   >> >>Put me in the loft next to J. S. Bach.<snip> > >I'm there, too! >   Looks like the maestro Bach needs to schedule a master class.   Dennis      
(back) Subject: Re: Organs made with non traditional materials From: michael@galaxy.nsc.com (Michael Wong x4241) Date: Fri, 6 Nov 1998 10:43:21 -0800   Hi Jorge:   > I4d like to know about organs whoose pipes are made with non traditional > materials. > I know that there is an organ in the Phillipines that has pipes made from bamboo. I have never heard it played though. > > Jorge Gomez > Michael > > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org  
(back) Subject: Re: Organs made with non traditional materials From: "V. David Barton" <vdbarton@erols.com> Date: Fri, 6 Nov 1998 13:41:30 -0500   I, too, have not heard it, but a CD recording is available. Check out the current OHS catalogue.   -----Original Message----- From: Michael Wong x4241 <michael@galaxy.nsc.com> To: pipechat@pipechat.org <pipechat@pipechat.org> Date: Friday, November 06, 1998 1:44 PM Subject: Re: Organs made with non traditional materials     >Hi Jorge: > >> I4d like to know about organs whoose pipes are made with non traditional >> materials. >> >I know that there is an organ in the Phillipines that has pipes made from >bamboo. I have never heard it played though. >> >> Jorge Gomez >> >Michael >> >> >> "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >> PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >> HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >> List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >> Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >> Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >    
(back) Subject: Re: Organs made with non traditional materials From: Afreed0904@aol.com Date: Fri, 6 Nov 1998 14:16:19 EST     In a message dated 11.6.98 1:46:16 PM, michael@galaxy.nsc.com writes:   <<pipes are made with non traditional materials.>>   And of course there's the Flexhaust (16'? 32'?) at Riverside Church.   Alan Freed  
(back) Subject: Re: Organs made with non traditional materials From: David Scribner <david@blackiris.com> Date: Fri, 6 Nov 1998 13:19:09 -0600   >Hi Jorge: > >> I4d like to know about organs whoose pipes are made with non traditional >> materials. >> >I know that there is an organ in the Phillipines that has pipes made from >bamboo. I have never heard it played though. >> >> Jorge Gomez >> >Michael >>   There has been, at least as I understand it, an experiment with making pipes out of stone somewhere in either Spain or Portugal. Supposedly, the whole organ is to be made out of stone.   In the Atlantic City Convention Hall organ by Midmer-Losh there is a set of pipes in the Echo division - the Bassoon 16', that have paper-mache resonators - they are free- reed pipes instead of beating reeds.   David  
(back) Subject: Re: Organs made with non traditional materials From: David Scribner <david@blackiris.com> Date: Fri, 6 Nov 1998 13:20:28 -0600   >In a message dated 11.6.98 1:46:16 PM, michael@galaxy.nsc.com writes: > ><<pipes are made with non traditional materials.>> > >And of course there's the Flexhaust (16'? 32'?) at Riverside Church. > >Alan Freed > I think this is better known as the Contra Gamba at 32'   David  
(back) Subject: Another Atlantic City broadcast - maybe From: David Scribner <david@blackiris.com> Date: Fri, 6 Nov 1998 13:28:52 -0600   Folks   I have just received word that hopefully on the "News with Jim Ledher" broadcast on PBS this evening there will be part of the footage shot on Tuesday morning during the Press Conference in the Convention Hall just prior to our recording sesssion.   I have received word from someone that checked with PBS so hopefully if politics don't interfere you can see and hear the Midmer-Losh on TV.   David ********************** David Scribner Director of Communications Atlantic City Convention Hall Organ Society http://www.acchos.org/ info@acchos.org  
(back) Subject: Re: Organs made with non traditional materials From: Bob Scarborough <desertbob@truelink.net> Date: Fri, 06 Nov 1998 12:12:13 -0800   At 10:43 AM 11/6/98 -0800, Michael Wong x4241 wrote:   >I know that there is an organ in the Phillipines that has pipes made from >bamboo. I have never heard it played though.   TADA! I have a recording of said organ! My folks were touring Asia in 1964, and happened upon the church, who luckily had an EP of the organ being played for sale. It's...uh....well, let's say their ears in the Phillipines aren't too critical in terms of tuning, it seems. Other than that, I recall it sounding VERY fluty in just about every stop. This organ was built by a Jesuit missionary, if I recall properly, who had no previous experience in organ building.   I shall dig into my archives to research this further, if anyone is interested.   DeserTBoB   PS: Wouldn't the chamber be a GREAT place for a luau? heheheh    
(back) Subject: ADMINISTRATIVE POSTING From: Administrator <admin@pipechat.org> Date: Fri, 6 Nov 1998 14:23:25 -0600   Hi everyone,   Just a gentle reminder that the topics for PipeChat are clearly defined on the webpage at http://www.pipechat.org. Please don't post things that have nothing at all to do with pipe/digital/electronic organs or related topics, such as chain letters, or solicitations of support for non-organ related ventures.   In addition, I have noticed, since I returned from my Sabbatical, a tendency to pounce on others. This is not defined to just one person. Please remember our primary guideline: "Be kind to one another."   Thanks to all of you for your paricipation in this valuable chat forum for organists and their friends.   Take care,   Pete!   Dr. Peter Pocock, Administrator and Co-Owner, PipeChat.  
(back) Subject: Re: Organs made with non traditional materials From: Afreed0904@aol.com Date: Fri, 6 Nov 1998 15:26:48 EST     In a message dated 11.6.98 2:22:51 PM, david@blackiris.com writes:   <<better known as the Contra Gamba at 32'>>   David: Thank you. I knew SOMEbody would know just what it was.   Alan  
(back) Subject: Part-Time Position, Salaries, etc. From: KriderSM@aol.com Date: Fri, 6 Nov 1998 16:30:41 EST   Subject: Re: Part-Time Position, Salaries, etc. Bob Scarborough <desertbob@truelink.net> wrote:   >Do they treat that with Prozac and Buspar, also? I must consult with my >band of head shrinkers....heheh! They're due to be "coming to take me away, >ha ha, he he!" >DeserTBoB   Sounds like DeserTBoB must have hit the Tutti ... ;-) nyuk, nyuk, nyuk!   Stan    
(back) Subject: Re: Time Travelling From: Aida van de Brake <Aida@cable.A2000.nl> Date: Fri, 06 Nov 1998 22:36:51 +0100   Dennis Goward wrote: > > >>Put me in the loft next to J. S. Bach.<snip> > > > >I'm there, too! > > Looks like the maestro Bach needs to schedule a master class. >   Could you guys please add my name to the list? And please add I'll be bringing my diskman with a recording of Virgil Fox's Coda of the Adagio from Master Johann's Toccata, Adagio & Fugue, just to show all of you and the rest of the world how Master J.S. will burst out in tears when I play it to him. I bet the Maestro will beg us to let him join us on our way back through the 5th dimension and let him try one of those incredible futuristic instruments.   Roc wrote: > I would just like to be in the Wanamaker store in the early 60's when Virgil > Fox was there playing "Come Sweet Death".   May we join you, Roc, and bring the Master along? I'm sure we'll give him the day of life. Or after-life, for that matter: can you imagine a sweeter death??       Aida.       ################################################################## ## An organ without strings is like a violin without a bow, ## ## An orchestra without conductor, a symphony without themes. ## ##################################################################