PipeChat Digest #583 - Saturday, November 7, 1998
 
Re: Organs made with non traditional materials
  by "Adrianne Schutt" <maybe@pipcom.com>
Transported in Tme
  by "Judy A. Ollikkala" <71431.2534@compuserve.com>
Re: Time Travelling
  by "Aida van de Brake" <Aida@cable.A2000.nl>
Re: National Saxophone Day today
  by "Aida van de Brake" <Aida@cable.A2000.nl>
Re: Transported in Time
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com>
Stalagtites, Stalagmites, Paper pipes, etc.
  by "Bud" <budchris@earthlink.net>
Re: Time Travelling
  by <ORGANUT@aol.com>
Re: Time Travelling
  by "Aida van de Brake" <Aida@cable.A2000.nl>
Re: Organs made with non traditional materials
  by <ORGANUT@aol.com>
Re: Time Travelling
  by "Michael Wong x4241" <michael@galaxy.nsc.com>
Re: Organs made with non traditional materials
  by "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com>
a Bach story
  by <KriderSM@aol.com>
Re: Time Travelling
  by <Afreed0904@aol.com>
Re: Organs made with non traditional materials  (reply to reply)
  by <ORGANUT@aol.com>
time travel to organist
  by <KriderSM@aol.com>
Re: a Bach story
  by <Afreed0904@aol.com>
Re: time travel to organist
  by "Bob Conway" <conwayb@post.queensu.ca>
Re: time travel to organist
  by <Afreed0904@aol.com>
Lutheran Propers (music search goes on)
  by "Bud" <budchris@earthlink.net>
Re: Stalagtites, Stalagmites, Paper pipes, etc.
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@truelink.net>
Re: Organs made with non traditional materials
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@truelink.net>
Re: Organs made with non traditional materials
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@truelink.net>
Re: time travel to organist
  by "V. David Barton" <vdbarton@erols.com>
Re: National Saxophone Day today
  by <RSiegel920@aol.com>
time travel und Herr Schweitzer
  by "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net>
Re: time travel
  by <RMc7832619@aol.com>
Re: Time Travelling
  by "bruce cornely" <cremona84000@webtv.net>
Old J.S.
  by "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net>
Re: a Bach story
  by "Mark W. McClellan" <omicron@netins.net>
Re: Organs made with non traditional materials ( 256' Fundation)
  by <ORGANUT@aol.com>
Re: time travel
  by "bruce cornely" <cremona84000@webtv.net>
Re: time travel--35 years
  by <Afreed0904@aol.com>
Re: a Bach story
  by "Bonnie Beth Derby" <orge@dreamscape.com>
 


(back) Subject: Re: Organs made with non traditional materials From: Adrianne Schutt <maybe@pipcom.com> Date: Fri, 06 Nov 1998 16:34:29 -0800   At 01:19 PM 11/6/98 -0600, David Scribner wrote: >There has been, at least as I understand it, an experiment with making >pipes out of stone somewhere in either Spain or Portugal. Supposedly, the >whole organ is to be made out of stone. Pictures, stoplist, & misc other info can be found at http://138.100.41.4/organ/iof9.htm   Have fun! Adrianne ;-> http://khyrstye.home.ml.org    
(back) Subject: Transported in Tme From: "Judy A. Ollikkala" <71431.2534@compuserve.com> Date: Fri, 6 Nov 1998 16:38:59 -0500   Agree with J. S. Bach MasterClass/Demonstration, that would be the ultimate trip.   There is a pipe organ inside the Luray Caverns in Virginia, I have a cassette recording of it, and have heard it live, very muted sound from ?stone?stalagmites/stalactites.  
(back) Subject: Re: Time Travelling From: Aida van de Brake <Aida@cable.A2000.nl> Date: Fri, 06 Nov 1998 22:43:37 +0100   Sorry Guys,     I wrote: > I'm sure we'll give him the day of life. > I meant: the day of his life.     Aida.     ################################################################## ## An organ without strings is like a violin without a bow, ## ## An orchestra without conductor, a symphony without themes. ## ##################################################################  
(back) Subject: Re: National Saxophone Day today From: Aida van de Brake <Aida@cable.A2000.nl> Date: Fri, 06 Nov 1998 23:20:59 +0100       Bud wrote: > > The big Skinner in Woolsey Hall at Yale has practically ever reed stop known > to man ... do any of you Yalies recall if it has one? [a saxophone] >     I checked the Woolsey stoplist but alas! I did find some saxophones though: the Atlantic City Convention Hall Organ has a 16' Saxophone (with 8' and 4' extensions) and an 8' Orchestral Sax on the Great-Solo, a 16' Contra-Sax with extensions on the Gallery Organ IV as well as a few on the Pedal.   The Wanamaker Organ has a 16' Bass Saxophone and an 8' Sax on the Orchestral as well as the Choir.       Aida.       ################################################################## ## An organ without strings is like a violin without a bow, ## ## An orchestra without conductor, a symphony without themes. ## ##################################################################  
(back) Subject: Re: Transported in Time From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com> Date: Fri, 6 Nov 1998 17:02:07 -0600 (CST)   At 04:38 PM 11/6/98 -0500, Judy Ollikkala wrote: >Agree with J. S. Bach MasterClass/Demonstration, that would be the ultimate >trip. > >There is a pipe organ inside the Luray Caverns in Virginia, I have a >cassette recording of it, and have heard it live, very muted sound from >?stone?stalagmites/stalactites.   It is not actually a pipe organ, though it has a pipe organ style console and an electric action fairly similar to a Wicks direct electric. In fact, however, there are no pipes, but the sound is made by stagmites and stalactites which are struck by little rubber hammers. There is a repeating mechanism for long held chords, a bit like some Wurly traps. The instrument is tuned by grinding a bit off the stalagmites or stalactites every now and then. It has been there quite a long time now, around half a century I would think. Don't forget: the mites go up and the tites come down :-)   John.    
(back) Subject: Stalagtites, Stalagmites, Paper pipes, etc. From: Bud <budchris@earthlink.net> Date: Fri, 06 Nov 1998 15:33:10 -0800   If I'm not mistaken, the "organ" in Luray Caverns makes its sounds by gently tapping the stones ... they hunted around for the various pitches, I believe. Now, there may be some ranks of pipes added to it, but I believe the main feature was the sound of the stones being tapped. It's been many years since I heard it ...   "The Amateur Organ-Builder" by Wicks (no relation to the company, and I may have the title wrong, but it's available from OHS) gives directions on how to make paper pipes.   Tom Cunningham (past president of OHS) had a small chamber organ with paper pipes in his shop, but I don't think he ever got around to restoring it ... the pipes I tooted on were fluty, obviously. Perhaps this organ went to Alan Laufman ... I know some of Tom's other stuff did when he went back to teaching.   Here's a question: has anyone ever heard really successful ALUMINUM pipes? I know some builders are using them instead of zinc basses for lighter weight (and economy?), but has anyone heard a successful complete aluminum rank of strings, principals, etc.? Does the difference in the metal substantially alter the harmonic development, etc.?   And a final question: it seems that OSHA has taken an interest in the use of LEAD in organ pipes ... anybody know the outcome, or has there been one yet?   Regards,   Bud   P.S. - See, I CAN write about organ topics TOO (grin)!    
(back) Subject: Re: Time Travelling From: ORGANUT@aol.com Date: Fri, 6 Nov 1998 18:35:08 EST   Re: If you could travel in time, where would you like to go? What would you like to see?   I would like to visit Jerusalem during the time of Christ. So many questions would be answered,with finality.   Later Phil L.  
(back) Subject: Re: Time Travelling From: Aida van de Brake <Aida@cable.A2000.nl> Date: Sat, 07 Nov 1998 00:46:45 +0100       ORGANUT@aol.com wrote: > > Re: If you could travel in time, where would you like to go? What would you > like to see? > > I would like to visit Jerusalem during the time of Christ. So many questions > would be answered,with finality. >     When you return from there, bring me a recording of a waterorgan!   Aida.  
(back) Subject: Re: Organs made with non traditional materials From: ORGANUT@aol.com Date: Fri, 6 Nov 1998 18:44:31 EST   What about the 128' and the 256' Fundation stop made from a sewer line, that was described on piporg-l several months ago!   Later, Phil L.  
(back) Subject: Re: Time Travelling From: michael@galaxy.nsc.com (Michael Wong x4241) Date: Fri, 6 Nov 1998 15:50:45 -0800   Hm... this isn't too organ related.   > Re: If you could travel in time, where would you like to go? What would you > like to see? > > I would like to visit Jerusalem during the time of Christ. So many questions > would be answered,with finality.   Garden of Eden at the time of Adam and Eve will probably answer more of your questions as you get to chat with the judeo christian God yourself, I am assuming that you are a christian, while the muslims probably want to visit Mohammed...   I would like to visit Bach to stop him from having the eye operation that eventually killed him!! Can you imagine what lovely music 4 or 5 extra years would have brought forth? Hearing him play and talking with him about his music would be a bonus too. I'd also like to hear what he thinks of the Romantic and Modern organ works.   > Later Phil L.   Michael  
(back) Subject: Re: Organs made with non traditional materials From: David Scribner <david@blackiris.com> Date: Fri, 6 Nov 1998 17:58:24 -0600   >What about the 128' and the 256' Fundation stop made from a sewer line, that >was described on piporg-l several months ago! > That story was just that a story - there is no such beast as either a 128' or a 256' pipe! Some of us were able to read thru the lines to get the meaning of the author.  
(back) Subject: a Bach story From: KriderSM@aol.com Date: Fri, 6 Nov 1998 19:23:13 EST   >Subject: Re: Time Travelling   >From: Bob Conway <conwayb@post.queensu.ca>     >"My son, I write music for God!" might be the answer (Bach) would give.   I guess this is the time to verify or shoot down a Bach story that I heard during my university music studies:   Briefly stated: Bach was living in a town which was under the control of a bad mayor. The mayor was finally defeated in an election (or otherwise thrown out of office). To celebrate this joyous occasion, Bach wrote "Now Thank We God".   Is this a true story?   Stan  
(back) Subject: Re: Time Travelling From: Afreed0904@aol.com Date: Fri, 6 Nov 1998 19:25:18 EST     In a message dated 11.6.98 6:43:13 PM, ORGANUT@aol.com writes:   << So many questions would be answered,with finality.>>   Phil epitomizes optimism.   Alan Freed  
(back) Subject: Re: Organs made with non traditional materials (reply to reply) From: ORGANUT@aol.com Date: Fri, 6 Nov 1998 19:28:04 EST   Actually I was able to read through the lines too. The story was funnier than a road runner cartoon, in my guesstimation.   Later, Phil L.  
(back) Subject: time travel to organist From: KriderSM@aol.com Date: Fri, 6 Nov 1998 19:33:34 EST   Personally, I'd like to follow Father Willis, the great organ builder, for a year or so.   Organist? Albert Schweitzer at the organ in Africa. I'll bet he could make the small instrument he used on the mission really sing!   Stan  
(back) Subject: Re: a Bach story From: Afreed0904@aol.com Date: Fri, 6 Nov 1998 19:46:43 EST     In a message dated 11.6.98 7:25:09 PM, KriderSM@aol.com writes:   <<Briefly stated: Bach was living in a town which was under the control of= a bad mayor. The mayor was finally defeated in an election (or otherwise thrown = out of office). To celebrate this joyous occasion, Bach wrote "Now Thank We Go= d".   Is this a true story?>>   Sounds pretty fishy to me; you can shoot it down. Martin Rinkart (or Rinckart) is credited with the text. He was pastor in Eilenberg for 32 ye= ars, much amidst the horrors of the Thirty Years' War; in 1637 the superintende= nt left, and two other pastors died, and Martin alone was left to minister to= the city; sometimes he had 40 to 50 burials per DAY! His text is believed to = have been published in his "Jesu Heartz-B=FCchlein" of 1636, before the Master'= s parents were born.   The tune, Nun danket alle Gott, ascribed to Johann Cr=FCger, appeared with Rinkart's text in the former's "Praxis Pietatis Melica," in 1647, a full generation before Bach's birth. Bach used the melody in his Cantatas 79 a= nd 192, and also as a wedding chorale in his "Choralges=E4nge," as well as in= an organ setting in his Eighteen Chorales.   So I doubt the story you've heard.   Alan Freed, St. Luke's Church, Manhattan    
(back) Subject: Re: time travel to organist From: Bob Conway <conwayb@post.queensu.ca> Date: Fri, 06 Nov 1998 19:52:14 -0500   Are you sure that Schweitzer had an organ at Lamborene? I understood that he had a piano with pedal attachment that was given to him by his well-wishers at the University of Strasbourg when he left there to go to Lamborene.   Bob Conway     At 07:33 PM 11/6/98 EST, you wrote: >Personally, I'd like to follow Father Willis, the great organ builder, for a >year or so. > >Organist? Albert Schweitzer at the organ in Africa. I'll bet he could make >the small instrument he used on the mission really sing! > >Stan >  
(back) Subject: Re: time travel to organist From: Afreed0904@aol.com Date: Fri, 6 Nov 1998 19:49:34 EST     In a message dated 11.6.98 7:38:35 PM, KriderSM@aol.com writes:   <<Albert Schweitzer at the organ in Africa. I'll bet he could make the small instrument he used on the mission really sing!>>   Am I wrong in remembering that it was not an organ, but a (one-manual) piano with a pedal-klavier attached?   Alan Freed, St. Luke's Church, Manhattan  
(back) Subject: Lutheran Propers (music search goes on) From: Bud <budchris@earthlink.net> Date: Fri, 06 Nov 1998 17:06:04 -0800   Does anyone have copies of the settings by modern composers of the Lutheran Introits and Graduals (this would be for the old books now, I guess)? Augsberg published some; they're out of print, and I'm missing a couple of volumes. There were also some folios by a composer whose name that started with "W", but I can't remember it right now ... don't have a complete set of those either. Finally, did Dr. Willan ever write Introits and Graduals for the Minor Festivals to go with the green book? If so, does anybody have 'em? We can use 'em in the Anglican service. I've tried the Bunjes formulary tones ... might as well learn the Gregorian (grin).   Regards,   Bud    
(back) Subject: Re: Stalagtites, Stalagmites, Paper pipes, etc. From: Bob Scarborough <desertbob@truelink.net> Date: Fri, 06 Nov 1998 17:13:30 -0800   At 03:33 PM 11/6/98 -0800, Bud wrote:   >And a final question: it seems that OSHA has taken an interest in the >use of LEAD in organ pipes ... anybody know the outcome, or has there >been one yet?<snip>   I used to be an OSHA compliance monitor back when I was still working, and lead was a much-discussed topic in many areas. You can bet that spotted metal, or ANY lead-based alloy will soon be going bye bye for new contruction. Not to worry...recent research has shown that the type of alloy hasn't that much to do with harmonic development as was previously thought. Knowing the surface characteristics of mill rolled aluminum, I would think aluminum would be an fair choice for experimentation for string family pipes, the catch being to find a proper thickness to scale ratio. Corrosion due to electrolysis would be a bummer, however, should ferrous metals be also used in their construction. Also, recycled aluminum prices are fairly cheap. We shall see....think of the fun with beer cans! hehehehe!   DeserTBoB    
(back) Subject: Re: Organs made with non traditional materials From: Bob Scarborough <desertbob@truelink.net> Date: Fri, 06 Nov 1998 17:13:34 -0800   At 06:44 PM 11/6/98 EST, ORGANUT@aol.com wrote: >What about the 128' and the 256' Fundation stop made from a sewer line, that >was described on piporg-l several months ago!   Ummmm....lemmie see here....<scribble scribble> AH! Yes! the 128' CCCCCC pipe would speak AT:   /sound tada.wav   4.0879063 Hertz....referenced to a'=440, equal temperment, of course. That would sound very much like an idling EMD diesel engine, methinks.   DeserTBoB   Bruce Cornely: Please halve the above for the 256' CCCCCCC pipe.    
(back) Subject: Re: Organs made with non traditional materials From: Bob Scarborough <desertbob@truelink.net> Date: Fri, 06 Nov 1998 17:13:35 -0800   At 05:58 PM 11/6/98 -0600, David Scribner wrote:   >That story was just that a story - there is no such beast as either a 128' >or a 256' pipe! Some of us were able to read thru the lines to get the >meaning of the author.<snip!>   Party pooper!   hehehe!    
(back) Subject: Re: time travel to organist From: "V. David Barton" <vdbarton@erols.com> Date: Fri, 6 Nov 1998 20:17:25 -0500   If I'm not mistaken (and, if I am, I'm sure somebody will be kind enough to correct me), the "small instrument" Schweitzer played in Africa was a pedal piano. I am not aware that he ever had access to an organ while in Africa. Any other takes on the situation?   -----Original Message----- From: KriderSM@aol.com <KriderSM@aol.com> To: PIPECHAT@pipechat.org <PIPECHAT@pipechat.org> Date: Friday, November 06, 1998 7:36 PM Subject: time travel to organist     >Personally, I'd like to follow Father Willis, the great organ builder, for a >year or so. > >Organist? Albert Schweitzer at the organ in Africa. I'll bet he could make >the small instrument he used on the mission really sing! > >Stan > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >    
(back) Subject: Re: National Saxophone Day today From: RSiegel920@aol.com Date: Fri, 6 Nov 1998 21:38:12 EST   I believe thereis also a saxophone stop on the 4/50+ rank Kimball at St. Mary of the Angels Church in Chicago. Regards R. J. Siegel  
(back) Subject: time travel und Herr Schweitzer From: "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net> Date: Fri, 6 Nov 1998 21:50:13 -0500   Hi all: Back on this time-travel thing, if I could sit on the bench and watch and listen as Al Melgard played that HUGE Barton beast in the Chicago Stadium. Also, sit in with Jesse Crawford and George Wright----taking notes. Rick dutchorgan@svs.net    
(back) Subject: Re: time travel From: RMc7832619@aol.com Date: Fri, 6 Nov 1998 22:07:00 EST   << Back on this time-travel thing >> Imagine that you are J.S.Bach, it is about 1715. You have the fame equal to that of a 20th century Micheal Jordan. And you have been asked to play a new organ that you have never seen nor heard and then to give your assessment of it. What would be the first thing you would play?   (Remember, that at this time, you are never alone with an organ. And your reputation will be affected by your playing.)  
(back) Subject: Re: Time Travelling From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Fri, 6 Nov 1998 22:27:56 -0500 (EST)     >If you could travel in time, where would you > like to go? What would you like to see?   I'm ready to retire folks! If I could time travel, I would go forward in time 100 years. I would certainly be a memory by then. I want to see heaven, where there is only tracker action, unequal temperament, flexible wind, bottomless cup of coffee, and you don't have to interrupt practicing to go to the bathroom! ;-)   And I'll get to play in verdant pastures with all my dogs!   ........................bruce cornely........................ o o o o ______________ o o o o d o g s ______________ o o h o o a o o ______________ o o p s   ............. cremona84000@webtv.net ............     Acquiring a dog may be the only opportunity a human ever has to choose a relative. -- Mordecai Siegal    
(back) Subject: Old J.S. From: "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net> Date: Fri, 6 Nov 1998 22:29:01 -0500   I heard a story once, that Bach would go to an organ builder to try out his latest instrument. J.S. would really put the organ thru its' paces. The builders almost feared his (Bachs) coming. As for Herr Schweitzer, I have two recordings by him. No mention of location of the instruments. One of the LP's could put one to sleep--if not Herr Schweitzer himself was sleeping while recording. Rick    
(back) Subject: Re: a Bach story From: "Mark W. McClellan" <omicron@netins.net> Date: Fri, 06 Nov 1998 21:25:35 -0600     --------------C38EC6F2FD2199C528DF80C1 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit       Afreed0904@aol.com wrote:   > In a message dated 11.6.98 7:25:09 PM, KriderSM@aol.com writes: > > <<Briefly stated: Bach was living in a town which was under the control of a > bad > mayor. The mayor was finally defeated in an election (or otherwise thrown out > of office). To celebrate this joyous occasion, Bach wrote "Now Thank We God". > > Is this a true story?>> >   You're close. It was Cantata No. 29 entitled "We, Thank Thee God, We thank Thee", written for the inauguration of the Leipzig Town Council on 17 Aug 1731. The previous town council was notoriously corrupt, and elections booted all of them out, much the same as in 1994. (I couldn't help it!)/s/ Mark     --------------C38EC6F2FD2199C528DF80C1 Content-Type: text/html; charset=us-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit   <HTML> &nbsp;   <P>Afreed0904@aol.com wrote: <BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=CITE>In a message dated 11.6.98 7:25:09 PM, KriderSM@aol.com writes:   <P>&lt;&lt;Briefly stated: Bach was living in a town which was under the control of a <BR>bad <BR>mayor. The mayor was finally defeated in an election (or otherwise thrown out <BR>of office). To celebrate this joyous occasion, Bach wrote "Now Thank We God".   <P>Is this a true story?>> <BR><A HREF="mailto:requests@pipechat.org"></A>&nbsp;</BLOCKQUOTE> You're close. It was Cantata No. 29 entitled "We, Thank Thee God, We thank Thee", written for the inauguration of the Leipzig Town Council on 17 Aug 1731. The previous town council was notoriously corrupt, and elections booted all of them out, much the same as in 1994. (I couldn't help it!)/s/ Mark <BR>&nbsp;</HTML>   --------------C38EC6F2FD2199C528DF80C1--    
(back) Subject: Re: Organs made with non traditional materials ( 256' Fundation) From: ORGANUT@aol.com Date: Fri, 6 Nov 1998 23:13:29 EST   Bob, I think that a frequency of 4.08 cps would fall somewhere on the Richter scale. Like 8.5 maybe!   Later, Phil L.  
(back) Subject: Re: time travel From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Fri, 6 Nov 1998 23:23:52 -0500 (EST)     ><< Back on this time-travel thing >>   >Imagine that you are J.S.Bach, it is about > 1715. You have the fame equal to that of a > 20th century Micheal Jordan. And you have > been asked to play a new organ that you > have never seen nor heard and then to give > your assessment of it. What would be the first > thing you would play? >(Remember, that at this time, you are never > alone with an organ. And your reputation will > be affected by your playing.) Let's see..... I'm Bach (sounds more like Arnold Schwartzenegger than Michael Jordan!) and it 5:15 in the afternoon... oh! you mean the year 1715 (hehehe). Nothing was said about the size of the organ, sooooooooooo...   I would open my memory bank to my Passacaglia and Fugue in c-minor.   Because it exploits both extremes of the compass of the organ. It also allows for varying registrations and moods for displaying all of the colors of the organ. There is also the opportunity to test the wind, making certain that it is flexible, yet sufficient. The variations also test the beauty of the tuning system, and the magnificent cadenza at the end provides an opportunity to check everything that might have been missed earlier. And, the final chord is a magnificent C-major chord which will be pure and perfect, thrilling everyone with the lowest rumbles of the pedal 32 beneath the sparking mixtures and rich reeds.   Unless, the organ is small, in which case the Passacaglia and Fugue will still be stunning and show the organ to its greatest advantage.   ..... and the best part will be, since it's 1715, no one will ask me to play "Amazing Grace"! ;-)   ........................bruce cornely........................ o o o o ______________ o o o o d o g s ______________ o o h o o a o o ______________ o o p s   ............. cremona84000@webtv.net ............     Acquiring a dog may be the only opportunity a human ever has to choose a relative. -- Mordecai Siegal    
(back) Subject: Re: time travel--35 years From: Afreed0904@aol.com Date: Fri, 6 Nov 1998 23:53:13 EST     In a message dated 11.6.98 11:25:09 PM, cremona84000@webtv.net writes:   <<I would open my memory bank to my Passacaglia and Fugue in c-minor. >>   Bruce, I had to know you'd pick something that ideal.   One Saturday night, summer 1963, I went with a brilliant young ladyfriend to visit briefly with her organ teacher, one Arthur Poister, in the recital hall at Syracuse University. He was at the console. On learning that I enjoyed organ music he graciously asked if there might be anything I'd like to hear. (Remember, I was a simple kid from North Dakota.)   Well, one should made a modest request in such cases, but I figured I'd never have a chance like this again, so you know what I asked for--and got.   I'd love to describe it, but it was 35 years ago, and your description, Bruce, could not be capped.   Alan Freed, St. Luke's Church, Manhattan  
(back) Subject: Re: a Bach story From: "Bonnie Beth Derby" <orge@dreamscape.com> Date: Sat, 7 Nov 1998 01:58:13 -0500   I thought that it was the Cantata ``The Heavens Laugh, the Earth Rejoices''!   Bonnie Beth Derby orge@dreamscape.com   ---------- > From: KriderSM@aol.com > > > I guess this is the time to verify or shoot down a Bach story that I heard > during my university music studies: > > Briefly stated: Bach was living in a town which was under the control of a bad > mayor. The mayor was finally defeated in an election (or otherwise thrown out > of office). To celebrate this joyous occasion, Bach wrote "Now Thank We God". > > Is this a true story? > >