PipeChat Digest #586 - Monday, November 9, 1998
 
Re: National Saxophone Day today
  by <Steskinner@aol.com>
Re: National Saxophone Day today
  by <Steskinner@aol.com>
Re: Unions - Are Pipe builders unionized?
  by <Steskinner@aol.com>
Re:PipeChat Digest #583 - 11/07/98
  by <jorge.gomez@nuclenor.es>
Re:"Organ Building for Amateurs" Book
  by "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com>
Organ Stuff for Sale
  by <Trackerbkr@aol.com>
making pipes
  by "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net>
Re: National Saxophone Day today
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com>
Re: Non-Traditional Stops...
  by <George.Greene@rossnutrition.com>
Skinner strings
  by "Judy A. Ollikkala" <71431.2534@compuserve.com>
Re: Non-Traditional Stops...
  by "David Scribner" <david@blackiris.com>
Re: Non-Traditional Stops...
  by "Jim Swist" <jswist@quickturn.com>
Revolving B-3
  by <George.Greene@rossnutrition.com>
Skinner Strings
  by "Bud" <budchris@earthlink.net>
Re: Organ Stuff for Sale
  by <ScottFop@aol.com>
Tierce mixtures and Carillon mixtures
  by <ScottFop@aol.com>
Re: Tierce mixtures and Carillon mixtures
  by "Jim Swist" <jswist@quickturn.com>
Re: Tierce mixtures and Carillon mixtures
  by <ScottFop@aol.com>
Re: Non-Traditional Stops...
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@truelink.net>
Re: Tierce mixtures and Carillon mixtures
  by "Bud" <budchris@earthlink.net>
Re: Non-Traditional Stops...
  by "Dennis Goward" <dgoward@uswest.net>
Re: National Saxophone Day today
  by "bruce cornely" <cremona84000@webtv.net>
Re: Unions - Are Pipe builders unionized?
  by "bruce cornely" <cremona84000@webtv.net>
Re: Non-Traditional Stops...
  by "bruce cornely" <cremona84000@webtv.net>
Re: Revolving B-3
  by "bruce cornely" <cremona84000@webtv.net>
Re: Skinner Strings
  by "bruce cornely" <cremona84000@webtv.net>
Re: Skinner Strings
  by "Jim Swist" <jswist@quickturn.com>
Use of term "Toaster" -- humor, not confrontation
  by "Dennis Goward" <dgoward@uswest.net>
Re: Non-Traditional Stops...
  by <Afreed0904@aol.com>
Re: Skinner Strings
  by "bruce cornely" <cremona84000@webtv.net>
 


(back) Subject: Re: National Saxophone Day today From: Steskinner@aol.com Date: Mon, 9 Nov 1998 06:08:26 EST   In a message dated 98-11-06 10:54:19 EST, you write:   << Are any of you aware of saxophone stops being included in non-theatre organs? Just curious. Thanks. Danny Ray >>   There is a saxophone stop in the solo of the Estey in the Conservatory of Music, University of the Pacific in Stockton, CA. I understand there is a sister of this organ in the Glide Memorial Motheodist church in SF--it may have one, too>   Steven Skinner First Presbyterian Church of the Covenant Erie, PA  
(back) Subject: Re: National Saxophone Day today From: Steskinner@aol.com Date: Mon, 9 Nov 1998 06:08:28 EST   In a message dated 98-11-06 11:40:19 EST, Robert Eversman writes:   << The original E.M. Skinner at the Cathedral of St. John the Divine I believe had a saxophone, imagine how that must have sounded in that vast acoustic! Esp. accompanied by lush Skinner strings >>   First Covenant Church has a 1983 Schantz (5/103) that incorporates many stops from the 1929 E. M. Skinner. There are four Skinner celestes--Dulciana (ch), Salicional (sw) Gambe (solo), and Aeoline (echo). They all sound the same except for volume, and none of them would I describe as "lush." They are all "stringy" which is fine, but I miss the "viola pomposa" celeste which I would describe as "voluptuous." The other Skinner I have experience with is at First Methodist Pasadena, CA (1913) and I would describe the strings in the same way--OK but not lush. Any comments?   Steven Skinner First Presbyterian Church of the Covenant Erie. PA  
(back) Subject: Re: Unions - Are Pipe builders unionized? From: Steskinner@aol.com Date: Mon, 9 Nov 1998 06:08:24 EST   In a message dated 98-11-06 10:04:24 EST, Desertbob writes:   << At 09:03 AM 11/6/98 -0500, robert.cowley wrote: >Due to the Union, that is exactly why M.P. Moller went out of business! Oh, come ON! M.P. Moller went out of business for several reasons, and I'm quite sure, like in MOST cases in this country, unionized labor is falsely blamed....again! >>   Query: I own a 1929 Moller (church model) Artiste. When I was in the pipe- organ business in Southern California I worked on a 1983 Moller which had the exact same pneumatic switching systems as my 1929 Moller. Who would have been responsible for retaining 1929 technology thru at least 1983--unionized labor (to protect the jobs of the pneumo-techs) or management (decidedly retro) or both? Anyone know?   BTW, I also worked on a 1939 Moller at First Baptist, Hollywood, that had an original, all electric 3 manual console that worked beautifully (the ivory was disintegrating, tho), and had tons of room in the console shell!   Steven Skinner First Presbyterian Church of the Covenant Erie, PA  
(back) Subject: Re:PipeChat Digest #583 - 11/07/98 From: <jorge.gomez@nuclenor.es> Date: Mon, 09 Nov 98 12:20:23 +0100       >Subject: Stalagtites, Stalagmites, Paper pipes, etc. >From: Bud <budchris@earthlink.net> >Date: Fri, 06 Nov 1998 15:33:10 -0800   >If I'm not mistaken, the "organ" in Luray Caverns makes its sounds by >...     >"The Amateur Organ-Builder" by Wicks (no relation to the company, and I >may have the title wrong, but it's available from OHS) gives directions >on how to make paper pipes.   I think that this BOOK could be very interesting. How can I buy it?   Jorge Gomez        
(back) Subject: Re:"Organ Building for Amateurs" Book From: David Scribner <david@blackiris.com> Date: Mon, 9 Nov 1998 06:40:43 -0600   >>"The Amateur Organ-Builder" by Wicks (no relation to the company, and I >>may have the title wrong, but it's available from OHS) gives directions >>on how to make paper pipes. > >I think that this BOOK could be very interesting. How can I buy it? > >Jorge Gomez > THe correct name of the book is "Organ-Building for Amateurs - a Practical Guide for Home-Workers" and the author is Mark Wicks. It was written around the turn of the century and was originally published in London. There are directions for making your own pipes out of what we now call "Kraft" paper.   I think the Organ Historical Society carries a reprint of it I can't find my catalogue for the OHS right now but you can go to their web site at http://www.organsociety.org to get their contact information. Or you can email them at: mailto:catalog@organsociety.org to get more information for the book.   David    
(back) Subject: Organ Stuff for Sale From: Trackerbkr@aol.com Date: Mon, 9 Nov 1998 07:50:04 EST   Scott, what is going to replace the Holtkamp at 1st Unitarian in Ann Arbor? Why are they selling the organ?   Laurie Ryan  
(back) Subject: making pipes From: "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net> Date: Mon, 9 Nov 1998 08:03:44 -0500   Eric V. Cockaynes' book....The Fairground Organ.....has chapters on making pipes from what the Brits call "bristol board". Corougated paper. Rick.    
(back) Subject: Re: National Saxophone Day today From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com> Date: Mon, 9 Nov 1998 07:15:36 -0600 (CST)   At 06:08 AM 11/9/98 EST, Steve Skinner wrote:   >There is a saxophone stop in the solo of the Estey in the Conservatory of >Music, University of the Pacific in Stockton, CA. I understand there is a >sister of this organ in the Glide Memorial Motheodist church in SF--it may >have one, too   Being on an Estey, I would imagine these would be labial saxaphones rather than reed stops. Do you know if this is this so?   John.    
(back) Subject: Re: Non-Traditional Stops... From: George.Greene@rossnutrition.com Date: Mon, 9 Nov 1998 09:11:28 -0500     I wish I had an 8' kazoo stop to use with the "happy clappy" choruses. It would have sounded appropriate on a couple of the ones that I was forced to play yesterday morning and it would give them the proper amount of respect. ;)   Phasers on "stun" please...!     -George    
(back) Subject: Skinner strings From: "Judy A. Ollikkala" <71431.2534@compuserve.com> Date: Mon, 9 Nov 1998 09:10:15 -0500   Is it possible or likely that Schantz or whomever revoiced the Skinner strings when installed elsewhere?   Judy Ollikkala  
(back) Subject: Re: Non-Traditional Stops... From: David Scribner <david@blackiris.com> Date: Mon, 9 Nov 1998 08:18:40 -0600   >I wish I had an 8' kazoo stop to use with the "happy clappy" choruses. >It would have sounded appropriate on a couple of the ones that >I was forced to play yesterday morning and it would give them the >proper amount of respect. ;) > >Phasers on "stun" please...! > There are some badly voiced "baroque" reeds that would fill the bill very well. i can think of a "regal" that would be wonderful for that purpose!!   David  
(back) Subject: Re: Non-Traditional Stops... From: Jim Swist <jswist@quickturn.com> Date: Mon, 09 Nov 1998 09:25:02 -0500   Actually, any short-length resonator reed (regal, vox humana, etc) is just a slip of the voicer's knife from sounding like a kazoo, doorbell buzzer, or some other unpleasant noise. I always admire well-done examples of same - I don't think it's easy...  
(back) Subject: Revolving B-3 From: George.Greene@rossnutrition.com Date: Mon, 9 Nov 1998 09:58:13 -0500     When I first read Scott's post, I thought it said "REVOLTING white Hammond B-3" instead of "REVOLVING". I think Bruce and Stan must be influencing my sense of humor.    
(back) Subject: Skinner Strings From: Bud <budchris@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 09 Nov 1998 07:48:44 -0800   The last E. M. Skinner I played regularly was the 4-manual in Opperman Hall at Florida State University (now incorporated into the organ at First Baptist, Jacksonville, I believe) in the 1950s. As I recall, the Swell strings weren't particularly "lush"; one had to add the Solo Gamba and Gamba celeste to get a rich sound. Skinner erzahlers were pretty, of course, but they weren't really a string sound. Larger Skinners with full-blown String Organs were another story. The FSU Skinner was a very incomplete organ ... it was designed as a sister of the one at University of Florida in Gainesville, but many of the ranks were prepared for and never installed. Also, that wasn't its original location. It had been in the main auditorium, where the Echo organ had its own two-manual console ... by closing doors around it, it could be used as a practice organ. When the organ was moved to Opperman, the Echo was cut loose and put down in the basement in a practice room.   FSU also had a fairly rare Skinner player organ ... it replaced the four-manual in the main auditorium. There was a separate player mechanism in a cabinet in addition to the one in the console ... the player cabinet would hold large rolls of symphonies, operas, etc. ... I have no idea if it's still there or not.   Skinner installed quite a few organs in Florida during the "boom" in the '20s ... Bethesda by the Sea Episcopal Church (West Palm Beach?) had a unique arrangement ... one side of the organ had swell shutters that opened into the gardens for outdoor Evensong. I believe there was also a separate moveable console that only played that side of the organ, but it was long-gone. Various hurricanes did considerable water damage to that side of the organ, and the whole thing was removed in favor of a Schlicker, which I believe has now been removed in favor of something else ... what, I don't remember.   The saddest was probably First Congregational in St. Petersburg. I heard Fox give the last recital on that organ. At the end, he made an eloquent plea for its restoration, but to no avail. It was removed in favor of a large state-of-the-art "toaster" and stored in a barn, which later burned.   At one time "E. M. Skinner Church Organs" was active in the area ... I think that was a couple of people who had worked with Skinner at the very end. They built organs for All Saints' Episcopal and St. David's Episcopal in Lakeland, Chapel of the Resurrection in Ruge Hall in Tallahassee, and Mulberry Methodist Church in Mulberry, but they bore little resemblance to a Skinner organ from the old days. They were mostly a maintenance and rebuild outfit.   When the late Dr. Ramona Cruikshank Beard was head of the organ department at FSU, she was a great champion of E.M. Skinner ... she had a little two-manual in First Presbyterian in Tallahassee, which she later had replaced with a three-manual (from where, I don't remember). I think that organ is also gone now.   There was a big four-manual in Sacred Heart Church in downtown Tampa, but when I was there they were using a Hammond spinet in the sanctuary .... in that huge church, it couldn't be heard beyond the second pew. I imagine the Skinner is still there, but I don't know if it plays or not.   Regards,   Bud    
(back) Subject: Re: Organ Stuff for Sale From: ScottFop@aol.com Date: Mon, 9 Nov 1998 11:33:39 EST   In a message dated 11/9/98 7:51:50 AM Eastern Standard Time, Trackerbkr@aol.com writes:   << Scott, what is going to replace the Holtkamp at 1st Unitarian in Ann Arbor? Why are they selling the organ? >>   Don't know. (on either question)   SFF  
(back) Subject: Tierce mixtures and Carillon mixtures From: ScottFop@aol.com Date: Mon, 9 Nov 1998 11:47:49 EST   Can anyone tell me- why were tierces included in chorus mixtures in past eras?   Second question: the National Shrine Kilgen has a III rank Carillon in the Choir division. It's pitches (I believe, without the specs right in front of me) are 2-2/3', 1-3/5' and 1'. What were these mixtures intended to be used for? Solo lines? Ensembles? Effect? I know that many romantic French organs had them but I am curious since they seem to be rather rare, in fact- these days one only seems to see them on older instruments.   Thanks!   Scott Foppiano, Director of Music and Liturgical Coordinator National Shrine of the Little Flower, Royal Oak, Michigan  
(back) Subject: Re: Tierce mixtures and Carillon mixtures From: Jim Swist <jswist@quickturn.com> Date: Mon, 09 Nov 1998 11:54:25 -0500   ScottFop@aol.com wrote: > Second question: the National Shrine Kilgen has a III rank Carillon in the > Choir division. It's pitches (I believe, without the specs right in front of > me) are 2-2/3', 1-3/5' and 1'.   You sure that isn't 2-2/3, 2, 1-3/5 at which point it would be a cornet of some kind? Does it break?  
(back) Subject: Re: Tierce mixtures and Carillon mixtures From: ScottFop@aol.com Date: Mon, 9 Nov 1998 11:57:47 EST   In a message dated 11/9/98 11:55:50 AM Eastern Standard Time, jswist@quickturn.com writes:   << You sure that isn't 2-2/3, 2, 1-3/5 at which point it would be a cornet of some kind? Does it break? >>     No- it is not a Cornet- it definitely has a 1' in it- you can hear it and the stop tab 9and contract) lists it as a "Carillon 3 ranks"   SF  
(back) Subject: Re: Non-Traditional Stops... From: Bob Scarborough <desertbob@truelink.net> Date: Mon, 09 Nov 1998 09:31:26 -0800   At 09:11 AM 11/9/98 -0500, George.Greene@rossnutrition.com wrote: > >I wish I had an 8' kazoo stop to use with the "happy clappy" choruses.<snip>   Hmmm...a great idea for working in pipe organ with the local "PrAzE" band, eh?   LOL!   DeserTBoB    
(back) Subject: Re: Tierce mixtures and Carillon mixtures From: Bud <budchris@earthlink.net> Date: Mon, 09 Nov 1998 09:33:31 -0800       ScottFop@aol.com wrote:   > Can anyone tell me- why were tierces included in chorus mixtures in past eras?   Probably because it was part of the naturally-occurring harmonic series, but that's a guess.   > Second question: the National Shrine Kilgen has a III rank Carillon in the > Choir division. It's pitches (I believe, without the specs right in front of > me) are 2-2/3', 1-3/5' and 1'. What were these mixtures intended to be used > for? Solo lines? Ensembles? Effect? I know that many romantic French organs > had them but I am curious since they seem to be rather rare, in fact- these > days one only seems to see them on older instruments.   I think they were supposed to imitate the tinkling of bells in the upper register, but that's a stretch.   The tierce has come and gone several times in chorus mixtures in the course of history ... as I recall, the English were fond of it; the Italians seldom used it; the Germans reserved it for solos, or it might be present in the secondary mixture; and of course the French can't live without it, at least in the cornets .... the question there being whether or not a cornet used in a Grand Jeu combination is a chorus mixture or not. Hook and Hastings sometimes included the tierce in the Great mixture; most 19th century American organs of any size had a Dolce Cornet III (2 2/3, 2, 1 3/5) in the Swell which might approach a chorus mixture, or be made of Dulciana pipes at the other extreme.   Walter Holtkamp Sr. built a three-stop detached Positiv for St. James Anglican Catholic Church in Cleveland in the '30s ... Quintadena 8, Prestant 4, and Cymbal IV, which was a Cymbal in the bass and a Cornet in the treble. The same organ also has a mounted cornet IV in the Swell as the only mixture.   If you don't find the Carillon useful in its present configuration, you might consider making the 1' a 2' and making it into a Cornet, unless you're into preserving the Kilgen absolutely "as-is" ... of course, as long as the change is documented and the top octave of pipes stored safely, it can always be reversed.   Regards,   Bud   > > > Thanks! > > Scott Foppiano, Director of Music and Liturgical Coordinator > National Shrine of the Little Flower, Royal Oak, Michigan > > "Pipe Up and Be Heard!" > PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics > HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org > List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org > Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org > Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org        
(back) Subject: Re: Non-Traditional Stops... From: "Dennis Goward" <dgoward@uswest.net> Date: Mon, 9 Nov 1998 17:48:47 -0700   > the "happy clappy" choruses.<snip>     Okay, we won't argue the musical quality or theological depth of these choruses -- some of them can be a bit "lacking". And I'm no great lover of "clap and sway" music.   But what's wrong with being happy in the house of God?   Dennis      
(back) Subject: Re: National Saxophone Day today From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Mon, 9 Nov 1998 12:43:38 -0500 (EST)   Actually, for my taste, both types of strings are beautiful. I miss the keen, incisive sound of the bacon frying celestes. But there are places where the more broad sound does the job better. In my present situation the Viole de Gambe/Celeste is actually a small principal (complete with a-bit-o-chiff). Used alone, the Viole is a nice small principal -- giving me two on the organ! --; however, when used with the Celeste which has more nicking, the chiff is not as evident and it is closer to a Viola Pomposa, but without the warmth. I guess that means I actually need three: Viole/celeste -- keen and stringy Viola Pomposa -- broad, warm string Salicional/celeste -- small principal yummy! I really have a difficult time saying which is my preference. All are beautiful and are useful; I suppose it would primarily depend upon the size of the organ. The Salicional/principal type would be more versatile in a small organ. The Viola is nice, but I would want an 8 Principal as well. The thin Viole is pure lush, unique, and a wonderful extravagance. However (!), the thin Viole sound does combine very uniquely with a Melodia.   ........................bruce cornely........................ o o o o ______________ o o o o d o g s ______________ o o h o o a o o ______________ o o p s   ............. cremona84000@webtv.net ............     Acquiring a dog may be the only opportunity a human ever has to choose a relative. -- Mordecai Siegal    
(back) Subject: Re: Unions - Are Pipe builders unionized? From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Mon, 9 Nov 1998 12:59:05 -0500 (EST)     >=A0Oh, come ON! M.P. Moller went out of > business for several reasons, and I'm quite > sure, like in MOST cases in this country, > unionized labor is falsely blamed....again! >> I don't know a huge bit about this, but I do know that care was not taken in the really artistic aspects of the instrument. I have absolutely no problem with Moller as a machine. They have been reliable, with easily understood mechanism (although often poorly installed for service), and technology consistently applied without change for change's sake.   >Who would have been responsible for > retaining 1929 technology thru at least > 1983--unionized labor (to protect the jobs of > the pneumo-techs) or management > (decidedly retro) or both? Again, this is conjecture, but I feel comfortable saying that continued use of a reliable system would be a management decision by those in charge of design. These pneumatic systems are so simple, quick and reliable, not to mention easly repaired. Again, I refer to the above answer regarding reliability/   >I also worked on a 1939 Moller at First Baptist, > Hollywood, that had an original, all electric 3 > manual console that worked beautifully .... Again, workmanship in the building of the mechanical portions of Moller organs was most often (and I used this only as a qualifier because I have never seen shoddy mechanical work on a Moller) top knotch. The problem gets to the artistic part: scaling -- trying to save money by underscaling and overblowing; pipe making -- using inexpensive alloys; voicing -- not spending proper amount of time voicing pipes; finishing -- um, not doing it!! This is primarily, I believe, why Moller went under. There are too many good builders now who are producing organs that sound wonderful and who spend the necessary time voicing and finishing their pipework so that the organ is not only mechanically reliable, but artistically beautiful as well. And speaking of artistically beautiful, I haven't seen a beautiful Moller facade in decades, except for a very few in a couple of categories: very expensive and big show instruments, and the few trackers they made.   ........................bruce cornely........................ o o o o ______________ o o o o d o g s ______________ o o h o o a o o ______________ o o p s   ............. cremona84000@webtv.net ............     Acquiring a dog may be the only opportunity a human ever has to choose a relative. -- Mordecai Siegal    
(back) Subject: Re: Non-Traditional Stops... From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Mon, 9 Nov 1998 13:04:31 -0500 (EST)   Simply remove your resonators on the reed, chamades are especialy effective!!!   ........................bruce cornely........................ o o o o ______________ o o o o d o g s ______________ o o h o o a o o ______________ o o p s   ............. cremona84000@webtv.net ............     Acquiring a dog may be the only opportunity a human ever has to choose a relative. -- Mordecai Siegal    
(back) Subject: Re: Revolving B-3 From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Mon, 9 Nov 1998 13:10:39 -0500 (EST)     > I think Bruce and Stan must be influencing my > sense of humor.   ..   ..   ..   ..   ..   ..   ..   ..   ..   ..   >heh heh heh   ........................bruce cornely........................ o o o o ______________ o o o o d o g s ______________ o o h o o a o o ______________ o o p s   ............. cremona84000@webtv.net ............     Acquiring a dog may be the only opportunity a human ever has to choose a relative. -- Mordecai Siegal    
(back) Subject: Re: Skinner Strings From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Mon, 9 Nov 1998 13:27:10 -0500 (EST)     >The last E. M. Skinner I played regularly was > the 4-manual in Opperman Hall at Florida > State University (now incorporated into the > organ at First Baptist, Jacksonville, I believe) > in the 1950s. As I recall, the Swell strings > weren't particularly "lush".... Actually, the organ went to Riverside Baptist in Jacksonville and was added (very poorly) to the formerly beautiful EM Skinner 3m. It suffered shoddy maintenance at the hands of Black Beard the Tuner, but has been rebuilt by Ontko & Young (I b'lieve). The sound is far from distinguished; it is just another organ, although on a 1-10 scale I'd give it a 5. The room being very nice helps, of course. With regard to First Baptist..... they have a very, very, very large "toaster oven", which possesses all kinds of splendiferous accolates and pedigrees, but, alas, just sounds like.... well, you know!   >Skinner was a very incomplete organ ... it was > designed as a sister of the one at University > of Florida in Gainesville... I'm not sure of the time span between the two organs, but I studied on the UF one and recall very nice strings (although a gentleman named Gillette thought they were principals!! hehe); however, it has been relieved of this gentility by Moller and is now quite indistinct. The beautiful solo reeds are gone ;-( !! Mechanically, everying apparently is up to Moller standards, so everything works well. The console is beautiful and well appointed, MIDI-fied, etc.   ........................bruce cornely........................ o o o o ______________ o o o o d o g s ______________ o o h o o a o o ______________ o o p s   ............. cremona84000@webtv.net ............     Acquiring a dog may be the only opportunity a human ever has to choose a relative. -- Mordecai Siegal    
(back) Subject: Re: Skinner Strings From: Jim Swist <jswist@quickturn.com> Date: Mon, 09 Nov 1998 13:38:42 -0500   bruce cornely wrote:   > It suffered shoddy maintenance at the hands of Black Beard the Tuner.   "Black Beard the Tuner" also works in Boston under an assumed name. He has two responses to any problem you write in the "organ work needed" log book...   1) Fix it incorrectly. 2) Write a long explanation of why it's doing what it's doing, but make no attempt to fix it.  
(back) Subject: Use of term "Toaster" -- humor, not confrontation From: "Dennis Goward" <dgoward@uswest.net> Date: Mon, 9 Nov 1998 19:00:21 -0700   ...... they have a very, very, very large "toaster oven",   Is this some kind of super duper electronic organ, or do they really have a top quality kitchen appliance?   Actually, calling an electronic organ a "toaster" is not completely correct .. . . a toaster has no significant electronics in it, being more electro-mechanical. By that logic, it would be more proper to refer to a direct-electric action pipe organ as a "toaster".   I shall now duck behind a solid object.   Dennis Goward      
(back) Subject: Re: Non-Traditional Stops... From: Afreed0904@aol.com Date: Mon, 9 Nov 1998 14:03:49 EST     In a message dated 11.9.98 12:44:53 PM, dgoward@uswest.net writes:   <<happy >>   Define "happy."   Alan  
(back) Subject: Re: Skinner Strings From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Mon, 9 Nov 1998 14:09:16 -0500 (EST)   Hehehe I used to play a "toaster" and when I would call the "home office" about a problem their responses were:   1) It's supposed to be that way; 2) No one else has complained.     >"Black Beard the Tuner" also works in Boston > under an assumed name. He has two > responses to any problem you write in the > "organ work needed" log book... >1) Fix it incorrectly. >2) Write a long explanation of why it's doing > what it's doing, but make no attempt to fix it. Geez. And they thought cloning was new!!!   ........................bruce cornely........................ o o o o ______________ o o o o d o g s ______________ o o h o o a o o ______________ o o p s   ............. cremona84000@webtv.net ............     Acquiring a dog may be the only opportunity a human ever has to choose a relative. -- Mordecai Siegal