PipeChat Digest #608 - Wednesday, November 25, 1998
 
Reverb on a practice organ
  by "gregory@mke.earthreach.com" <gregory@mke.earthreach.com>
Re: Diaphones
  by "John Moore" <john_moore@ibm.net>
Virgil For
  by "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net>
Re: Reverb on a practice organ
  by "Adam and Christine Levin" <levins@westnet.com>
Re: Diaphones
  by "Scottish Theatre Organ Preservation Society" <mail@stops.org>
Re: Classics on TO--Loud Diaphones----
  by "Kevin Cartwright" <kevin1@alaweb.com>
Diapasons/ Posuanes
  by "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net>
Theatre organ trems
  by <KriderSM@aol.com>
Diaphones
  by <KriderSM@aol.com>
Why a loud Diaphone?
  by <KriderSM@aol.com>
Re: Theatre organ trems
  by "rollin smith" <rollinsmithv@worldnet.att.net>
Tremulants On?
  by "Keith Fortune" <kfortune@webtv.net>
PBS weekend broadcast on organist shortage
  by "Judy A. Ollikkala" <71431.2534@compuserve.com>
Traveling Moller
  by "Jon C. Habermaas" <opus1100@theatreorgans.com>
 


(back) Subject: Reverb on a practice organ From: "gregory@mke.earthreach.com" <gregory@mke.earthreach.com> Date: Tue, 24 Nov 98 06:14:05 -0600   Greetings:   I have been following this discussion of reverb in practice instruments and home installations. If the instrument is for performance, let the reverb go! For practice....no way!   When I went to the University of Wisconsin there was NO reverb in the practice rooms (of course, these were pipe organs). This helped develop a clean technique.   It may be nice to listen to your playing in a cathedral-like setting, but technique will eventually become sloppy when practicing in a large reverbant situation.   Tom Gregory  
(back) Subject: Re: Diaphones From: "John Moore" <john_moore@ibm.net> Date: Tue, 24 Nov 1998 07:57:59 -0500 (EST)   Virgil Fox played a WONDERFUL benefit concert at the Atlanta Fox Moller during the "Save The Fox" campaign. The program was almost entirely J.S. Bach. Fox was very complimentary of the organ, but DID express some distaste for the console! Since the diaphone is the only 32 stop available, I would imagine that he used it.    
(back) Subject: Virgil For From: "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net> Date: Tue, 24 Nov 1998 08:29:55 -0500   I have an album of Mr. Fox playing the Witchta Century II ( x-N Y Paramount Wurli ). Nice album, but bless his heart, he was no theatre organist. Really got the audiance going, tho. Rick    
(back) Subject: Re: Reverb on a practice organ From: Adam and Christine Levin <levins@westnet.com> Date: Tue, 24 Nov 1998 09:17:35 -0500 (EST)   On Tue, 24 Nov 1998, gregory@mke.earthreach.com wrote: > I have been following this discussion of reverb in practice instruments > and home installations. If the instrument is for performance, let the > reverb go! For practice....no way! > When I went to the University of Wisconsin there was NO reverb in the > practice rooms (of course, these were pipe organs). This helped develop > a clean technique. > It may be nice to listen to your playing in a cathedral-like setting, > but technique will eventually become sloppy when practicing in a large > reverbant situation.   I think it'd be useful to practice *both* ways. I'm only a year into my lessons, but I've already found that technique must change when in larger, more reverberant spaces, because otherwise everything gets muddy when you play too quickly. In smaller spaces, though, you can play more legato and get away with it because the sound doesn't overlap as much.   Practice both ways to be used to many different acoustics.   -Adam   Rutherford, NJ USA Free speech online! _/ http://westnet.com/~levins/ ________/ I DON'T KNOW ABOUT YOU, he said, <*> __________________________/ BUT I COULD MURDER A CURRY. -O /    
(back) Subject: Re: Diaphones From: "Scottish Theatre Organ Preservation Society" <mail@stops.org> Date: Tue, 24 Nov 1998 22:32:22 -0000   Hi All   The McEwen Hall organ in Edinburgh (Hope-Jones - Willis - = Rushworth&Dreaper) still has its 32 and 16 diaphones, BUT they are = politely called Posaunes (:-))     Larry    
(back) Subject: Re: Classics on TO--Loud Diaphones---- From: Kevin Cartwright <kevin1@alaweb.com> Date: Tue, 24 Nov 1998 16:31:39 -0600   The diaphone is loud for the same reason a nachthorn is not a diapason.   krc      
(back) Subject: Diapasons/ Posuanes From: "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net> Date: Tue, 24 Nov 1998 17:42:44 -0500   A diaphone is to be felt more and heard less in most cases.    
(back) Subject: Theatre organ trems From: KriderSM@aol.com Date: Tue, 24 Nov 1998 20:08:25 EST   "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net> wrote:   <Snip>However, I doubt if old J.S. would appreciate his toccata's and fugue's on full trem. His Jig Fugue would really have one jiggin'. Years ago, violinist Herr Fritz Kreisler ( a fellow country-man ), did recordings with theatre organ. Several light classics with TO were recorded in the 20's...very enjoyable. As regards full-fledged, long hair, nose in the air, european continent, serious stuff with TO, well, that would take imagination, and cooperation between all parties concerned. Rick<Snip>   Oh, NOooooooooooooooo. Prejudicial Statement Police are coming!!!!! TO does no , NOT stand for Tremulant On. The BEST Theatre Organists use trems judiciously. Some of the most sultry TO sounds utilize the Harmonic Tuba in the tenor octave, untremmed! Father Jim Miller, TO artist specializing in TO blues and jazz music plays more untremmed than tremmed music.   My favorite Duke Ellington CD is performed by Anders Paulsson, soprano Sax, and Harry Huff, classical organ. It was recorded at Katarina Church in Stockholm.   Did I mention the Lew Williams "Rhapsody In Blue" recording? Not one trem in the classical pieces played by Lew.   WurliStan  
(back) Subject: Diaphones From: KriderSM@aol.com Date: Tue, 24 Nov 1998 20:08:22 EST   kevin1@alaweb.com writes:   <snip>I think I'll make a CD: "Breaking Tradition-Your Classical Favorites on the Theatre Organ-Trems and All"<snip>   Let me know when you do. I will buy it. I would like to repeat that Lew Williams, a classically trained organist, plays some AWESOME classical literature on his "Rhapsody In Blue" CD Check it out. Also, Carlo Curley plays classical on the 5/80 Sanfillipo Wurlitzer.   BTW, a local AGO member, Brian Johnson, did a neat demo for the joint AGO/COTOS meeting two years ago. He played a half dozen selections of classical organ on the Columbus (OH) Ohio Theatre's Robert Morton. He selected a selection composed for string stops, then played it using the Morton's strings, another selection calling for a reed chorus and used the Morton's reeds, etc. His point was,"If these composers had had access to a theatre organ, this is what his works would have sounded like." I don't know how the AGO members evaluated his presentation, but this neophyte afficionado of classical organ left the meeting with a much larger appreciation for that type of music. The Robert Morton French Horn rank is the most realistic French Horn ever built by any organ company. I would like to see classical literature written especially for this rank.   OTOH, classical builders have created some unusually romantic reeds. The Ershaler (sp) with its celeste is must haunting. The Contra Trombone does come a close second to providing a Diaphone-like foundation to full organ playing.   WurliStan  
(back) Subject: Why a loud Diaphone? From: KriderSM@aol.com Date: Tue, 24 Nov 1998 20:08:28 EST   Bruce Cornely asks: Just curious.... why does a Diaphone have to be loud? Is it out of necessity or tradition?   Just the way it was designed. Why is a Contra Trombone loud? Same reason. It is the rank that provides the base foundation in full organ.   WurliStan  
(back) Subject: Re: Theatre organ trems From: "rollin smith" <rollinsmithv@worldnet.att.net> Date: Tue, 24 Nov 1998 20:13:36 -0500   "violinist Herr Fritz Kreisler ( a fellow country-man ), did recordings with theatre organ"   Could you please tell us what recordings he did with a theat"er" organ, and--perhaps--who was the organist?   Rollin Smith    
(back) Subject: Tremulants On? From: kfortune@webtv.net (Keith Fortune) Date: Tue, 24 Nov 1998 18:46:42 -0800 (PST)   I must comment on this, sent by Wurlistan.   Oh, NOooooooooooooooo. Prejudicial Statement Police are coming!!!!! TO does no , NOT stand for Tremulant On. The BEST Theatre Organists use trems judiciously. Some of the most sultry TO sounds utilize the Harmonic Tuba in the tenor octave, untremmed! Father Jim Miller, TO artist specializing in TO blues and jazz music plays more untremmed than tremmed music.   I had the pleasure of meeting Father Jim Miller a while back. He played a concert here in Portland. Not only did he play a lot of great music, he also had the whole place cracking up with jokes and stories. Afterwards he came down to the skating rink to play our 4/18 Wurlitzer. A couple of hours later, he finally decided he had had enough. I did notice that he used the different trems very creatively. He really made that organ sound completely different than anyone else I have heard play it. And the blues were just great.   Keith    
(back) Subject: PBS weekend broadcast on organist shortage From: "Judy A. Ollikkala" <71431.2534@compuserve.com> Date: Tue, 24 Nov 1998 23:02:34 -0500   For your interest from Judy Ollikkala: from a non-list member---   Date: Tue, 24 Nov 1998 18:45:16 -0400 From: Thomas Frost <ssms@berkshire.net> Reply-To: music@baygo.com   Dear Friend:   A national PBS telecast the week-end of Nov. 27 will showcase Berkshire Friends of the Organ, and some of its work combatting the shortage of organists.   Weve just received an e-mail from the producer at PBS- Boston, they will feed the show nationally to their affiliate stations on Nov. 27, Religion and Ethics Weekly. They advise, most stations carry it on Saturday or Sunday, some Monday.   Please consult your local PBS affiliate for time of broadcast. And please, pass the word.   In the Berkshires, its on WMHT/Q from Schenectady, also carried on local cable. WMHT/Q normal broadcast time is Saturday afternoon. They are in a fund drive, and advise the show will not air this week.   BFO has requested WMHT/Q to arrange a delayed broadcast. If you want them to do this, contact their TV programming at 518-357-1700. e-mail "Robert McBride"<rmcbride@wmht.org> should reach them, he's FM programming director there.   A crew from PBS, led by producer Kathryn White, spent a day with us in the Berkshires, six weeks ago.   They filmed a session of our Pipes and Pedals organ adventure with a group of young people, all of them got to play the highest and lowest notes. A highlight was Bachs Etude for Pedal solo, played with panache by a high-school senior, BFO Founding Member Carlton Maaia II.   Besides interviews with BFO members and friends, on our concerns and work, PBS filmed a liturgy in St. Marks Church, R.C., Pittsfield, with St. Marks Adult Choir, yours truly O/D, and featuring the Kilgen Op. 4826, newly restored by Stefan Maier.   Please, pass the word: Religion and Ethics Weekly this week-end.   All best wishes, ;-) Tom Frost  
(back) Subject: Traveling Moller From: "Jon C. Habermaas" <opus1100@theatreorgans.com> Date: Tue, 24 Nov 1998 01:24:08 -0600   I know this was on one of the lists in the past, so I apologize for the repetition. Can any give me the current location for Fortes' Traveling Moller and any other information you may have.   thanks,   Jon C. Habermaas