PipeChat Digest #609 - Wednesday, November 25, 1998
 
Re: Traveling Moller
  by <danbel@earthlink.net>
Re: Diaphones
  by "Jason D. Comet" <bombarde8@juno.com>
HAPPY THANKSGIVING
  by <danbel@earthlink.net>
Happy Thanksgiving
  by <Myosotis51@aol.com>
Re: Diaphones
  by "Richard Scott-Copeland" <organist@hantslife.co.uk>
AGO-Standards (1933)
  by "Aida van de Brake" <Celeste@cable.A2000.nl>
Re: Diaphones
  by "Richard Pinel" <rpinel@theatreorgans.com>
Re: PBS weekend broadcast on organist shortage
  by <DudelK@aol.com>
Re: AGO-Standards (1933)
  by "Aida van de Brake" <Celeste@cable.A2000.nl>
Re: PBS weekend broadcast on organist shortage
  by "Dennis Goward" <dgoward@uswest.net>
Organs For Theatres and Auditoriums
  by "Jon C. Habermaas" <opus1100@theatreorgans.com>
Re: AGO-Standards (1933)
  by "Dennis Goward" <dgoward@uswest.net>
Swell Shoe Locations
  by <ScottFop@aol.com>
Re: Diaphones
  by <ORGANUT@aol.com>
Gledhill's Beatles medley
  by <KriderSM@aol.com>
Re: PBS weekend broadcast on organist shortage
  by <WRansomeJr@aol.com>
Re: Diaphones
  by <WRansomeJr@aol.com>
Bach and 32'
  by "Robert Horton" <gemshorn@ukans.edu>
Bach and 32' Stops
  by "Ben Baldus" <bbaldus@voyager.net>
Bach and 32' Stops
  by "Ben Baldus" <bbaldus@voyager.net>
Re: Organs For Theatres and Auditoriums
  by "Kevin Cartwright" <kevin1@alaweb.com>
Organist shortage
  by "Judy A. Ollikkala" <71431.2534@compuserve.com>
Re: Organs For Theatres and Auditoriums
  by <CHERCAPA@aol.com>
I've been offended AGAIN...
  by "Kevin Cartwright" <kevin1@alaweb.com>
Re: Organist shortage
  by "Karl E. Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersv.edu>
Re: I've been offended AGAIN.
  by <ORGANUT@aol.com>
 


(back) Subject: Re: Traveling Moller From: danbel@earthlink.net Date: Wed, 25 Nov 1998 08:12:19 -0500   At 01:24 AM 11/24/98 -0600, you wrote: >I know this was on one of the lists in the past, so I apologize for >the repetition. Can any give me the current location for Fortes' >Traveling Moller and any other information you may have. >   The Moller is in the Pasadena Civic Auditorium (California) and was installed there a good long time ago by David Junchen.     djb    
(back) Subject: Re: Diaphones From: bombarde8@juno.com (Jason D. Comet) Date: Fri, 20 Nov 1998 22:55:02 -0500   I'll try   The *pipe* has a vibrator in the chest that is like a circular pad or disc that, when air is passed around the disc, the disc springs back against the wall in the same way that the shallots and reeds do. Except the disc isn't brass, and it is circular. The *pipe* is just the resonator. The diagram I saw of it had the valve right on the other side of the wood from the disc.   Is that close, or not?   Jason Comet bombarde8@juno.com |\ Worship Chairperson, Organ Curator, | \ organist, choir director, director of music, O and janitor at Bethany U.M. Church, Watertown, NY   On Fri, 20 Nov 1998 13:30:08 -0800 Bud <budchris@earthlink.net> writes: >OK, now I'm curious, and I gave all my organ books away ... somebody >wanna tackle how it is that a diaphone WORKS? And what makes it >different from a reed stop? > >Regards, > >Bud > > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org > >   ___________________________________________________________________ You don't need to buy Internet access to use free Internet e-mail. Get completely free e-mail from Juno at http://www.juno.com/getjuno.html or call Juno at (800) 654-JUNO [654-5866]  
(back) Subject: HAPPY THANKSGIVING From: danbel@earthlink.net Date: Wed, 25 Nov 1998 09:29:47 -0500   Wishing everyone online a very Happy Thanksgiving tomorrow.   Don't eat too much turkey!! :):)   Dan  
(back) Subject: Happy Thanksgiving From: Myosotis51@aol.com Date: Wed, 25 Nov 1998 09:58:57 EST   <A HREF="http://members.aol.com/myosotis51/page2/Thanksgiving.htm">Happy Thanksgiving</A>  
(back) Subject: Re: Diaphones From: "Richard Scott-Copeland" <organist@hantslife.co.uk> Date: Wed, 25 Nov 1998 15:10:00 -0000   Dear List,   With regard to the instrument mentioned below, am I right in thinking that the diaphones were originally available at the console in two powers (presumably altering the wind supply remotely) - loud and not so loud?   Something seemed to job my memory here?     Hi All   The McEwen Hall organ in Edinburgh (Hope-Jones - Willis - Rushworth&Dreaper) still has its 32 and 16 diaphones, BUT they are politely called Posaunes (:-))     Larry          
(back) Subject: AGO-Standards (1933) From: Aida van de Brake <Celeste@cable.A2000.nl> Date: Wed, 25 Nov 1998 20:04:21 +0100   Hi Everyone,   I've been reading Barnes' 'The Contemporary American Organ'. Well, at least the part about the AGO-Report of 1933. This because I'm planning to have a 3-manual study organ built, and I don't intend to leave the location of the shoes to the builders, risking a totally 'customized' result.   As Barnes presents it, the standard for expression and cresc. shoe placement is: 'Swell shoe to be located directly in front of the E-F gap. Choir shoe to left of Swell. Solo to right of Swell. Crescendo shoe to the right of all others, slightly raised. Great to displace Solo in three-manual organs. To the left of Choir in four-manual organs.'   Can anyone tell me how 'standard' these AGO-Standards are nowadays? I mean: on existing organs in the States, in Britain, in Europe?     Thanks,   Aida van de Brake, Zaandam, Holland.  
(back) Subject: Re: Diaphones From: "Richard Pinel" <rpinel@theatreorgans.com> Date: Tue, 24 Nov 1998 21:34:19 -0000     >Virgil Fox played a WONDERFUL benefit concert at the Atlanta Fox Moller >during the "Save The Fox" campaign. The program was almost entirely >J.S. Bach. Fox was very complimentary of the organ, but DID express >some distaste for the console! Since the diaphone is the only 32 stop >available, I would imagine that he used it.     Dear All,   Firstly I have NOTHING against Diaphones :-)   Secondly, JSB probably wouldn't have had any 32 foots at all, so it is not stylistic to use them for his works (but then......not everybody listens to style!!!).   Thirdly, With greatest respect to them, big classical organs do not need diaphones, as most big 32 foot reeds suffice (for example my uncles organ at St Mary's, Redclife, Bristol (the biggest parish church organ in England) has two 32 foot reeds, and 2 32 for flues, one of the former being an obliterating Ophacliede (or something like that!) which is more than enough to make the windows shake!!!)   Later,   Richard.      
(back) Subject: Re: PBS weekend broadcast on organist shortage From: DudelK@aol.com Date: Wed, 25 Nov 1998 14:54:36 EST   In a message dated 98-11-24 23:06:18 EST, you write:   >Subj: PBS weekend broadcast on organist shortage   At the risk of beating a dead horse mercilessly, let one posit that there is not so much a shortage of organists as a shortage of decent, well-paying jobs for organists. As well as a shortage of supportive clergy and congregations, decent instruments, acoustically decent rooms, etc. ad nauseam.   And a happy Thanksgiving to all, Dudel in Washington  
(back) Subject: Re: AGO-Standards (1933) From: Aida van de Brake <Celeste@cable.A2000.nl> Date: Wed, 25 Nov 1998 21:40:19 +0100   Quote from another list - any reactions maybe?     Someone wrote: > > Aida van de Brake is thinking of commissioning a 3-manual house organ, > mistrusts leaving details of console dimensions to the builders and has > been reading Barnes for erudition. > > I'll leave to others to consider the assumption that all divisions are > to be enclosed. However, I would have thought that William H. Barnes > should be regarded as an authority on about an equal footing to his > English loud-mouthed and opinionated predecessor Dr Dionysious > Lardner. > > My own favourite comment, from the first edition of his great work, is > the caption to a pair of photographs (Plate IX): > > "Console of St Gervais, Paris. They began like this in Europe. But we > in America were not quite so ancient and our first organs were more > easily controlled. This old console in St Gervais, Paris, had thirty- > seven registers and stops that pulled out by the yard, it would seem. > The pedal clavier was nothing to brag about. Wonder what the tone > was like?" > > Now there's scholarship for you! > > Best wishes, > > -Someone.  
(back) Subject: Re: PBS weekend broadcast on organist shortage From: "Dennis Goward" <dgoward@uswest.net> Date: Wed, 25 Nov 1998 14:01:00 -0700   >At the risk of beating a dead horse mercilessly, let one posit that there is >not so much a shortage of organists as a shortage of decent, well-paying jobs >for organists. As well as a shortage of supportive clergy and congregations, >decent instruments, acoustically decent rooms, etc. ad nauseam.     At the risk of inciting a merciless flaming from some of the strongly opinionated posters hereabouts, let me propose that it may be expectations that need some alterations here.   Many musicians in general have a difficult time earning a living in one place practicing their art -- but this has been common in all the arts since the first cave painting.   I like the money I earn in my "day job". I am not in the category of an organist who could hold down a spot at Riverside Church or Garden Grove, so I don't expect any church any time soon is going to pay me the combined earnings of my church job and my day job. So, I accept leading a "double life". But I enjoy having a supportive minister, a congregation that appreciates me ( to the point where they pay me a weekly wage for part time that exceeds what some of them get for full time work). I guess two out of three is okay, even if I do have to work a little harder.   To sum it up: If you're not satisfied with your wages, the organ where you're at, you feel unappreciated, then go somewhere else. And if you can't earn 40 - 60K as an organist, then join the realms of the "starving artists" that have helped beautify this world for centuries. You want perfection, you won't find it in this life. And if that perfection is more important to you that ministering to the congregation you choose to serve, you may not need to worry about it later either.   Having said all that, I will now assume a fetal position and await the onslaught that will no doubt soon be forthcoming.   Dennis Goward      
(back) Subject: Organs For Theatres and Auditoriums From: "Jon C. Habermaas" <opus1100@theatreorgans.com> Date: Tue, 24 Nov 1998 15:01:10 -0600   There have been several posts regarding finding organs for school auditoriums and Performing Arts Centers. Just received the newsletter from the Joliet chapter of the ATOS and they report that David Wollagher recently donated his 3/14 Barton to the Fischer Theatre in Danville, Il. A picture of the ornate console for this organ has been prominently featured in the Theatre Organ Home page and the organ was offered for sale in the classifieds. Anyone hoping to find an organ which could be donated should contact those who have organs for sale, and request consideration if the organ doesn't sell. I know from experience that the former owner of my Wurlitzer was looking for someone who would take the organ as a donation. Fortunately for me, no one wanted the organ at that time. Don't be timid about asking...if they're not interested there's no harm done, and who knows, something could come of it.   Just a thought...Happy Thanksgiving all..   regards,     Jon C. Habermaas  
(back) Subject: Re: AGO-Standards (1933) From: "Dennis Goward" <dgoward@uswest.net> Date: Wed, 25 Nov 1998 14:08:00 -0700       >Quote from another list - any reactions maybe? > >Someone wrote: >> I'll leave to others to consider the assumption that all divisions are >> to be enclosed. However, I would have thought that William H. Barnes >> should be regarded as an authority on about an equal footing to his >> English loud-mouthed and opinionated predecessor Dr Dionysious >> Lardner.   Someone else wrote "great mind discuss ideas, small minds discuss other people'   But I digress. Whether Dr. Barnes is opinionated or not does not negate the fact that his book presents a wealth of information on the organ. In addition, it was the only book readily available in many places. I've owned a copy for 30 years, and it's provided me with a lot of facts and a lot of reading pleasure. I don't know who Dr. Lardner is, but if the individual quoted puts him in the same league as Dr. Barnes, I think I'd like to read his book, too.   However, on the subject that led to this thread -- console dimensions -- Barnes mearly quotes the AGO standards, and included the actual document in his book.   As to his opinions, help me here -- when did it become unacceptable to have opinions on matter of art? And isn't organbuilding an Art? If one person prefers a English diapason over a German prinzipal, is he less an organbuilder or organist than someone else?   Dennis Goward        
(back) Subject: Swell Shoe Locations From: ScottFop@aol.com Date: Wed, 25 Nov 1998 16:53:37 EST   The Grande Kilgen at the National Shrine of the Little Flower has six enclosed divisions. The recent thread regarding AGo standards of 1933 got me thinking of alternatives to positioning the expression shoes. With Swell between E and F, Choir to the left and Solo to the right of that- we STILL have Main Great, Antiphonal Great and Antiphonal Solo to deal with and assign to a pedal.   The Kilgen has six expression pedals AND a Crescendo pedal. We have a "Kimballesque" Swell Positioner and indicator Panel over the Solo manual and behind the music rack. I currently have the expression pedals set as follows (left to right):   Antiphonal Great Antiphonal Swell Main Choir Main Swell (which is actually just slightly to the left of the E/F gap) Main Solo Main Great   the reason for this is because the Antiphonal expression is together at the far left, al option being grouping the two Swell divisions together on the same pedal and the Main Great at the far right which is hardly ever used.   Any thoughts on this. It will be fun finding different options of using these expression pedals!   Scott F. Foppiano, Director of Music and Liturgical Coordinator National Shrine of the Little Flower, Royal Oak, MI  
(back) Subject: Re: Diaphones From: ORGANUT@aol.com Date: Wed, 25 Nov 1998 18:22:30 EST   Jason,   The disc on my WurliTzer Diaphone beaters are indeed brass. In fact the flat bar which is connected to them is made of brass also. A lead weight is soldered to the back of the flat bar and fairly close to the disc. Its' purpose is to add mass to the beater assembly so it can be made to vibrate at a lower frequency. (More mass, more inertia)   I would agree that different P.O. manufacturers probably used different materials for these assemblies. WurliTzer had the reputation of stressing quality in materials and workmanship.   Later, Phil L.  
(back) Subject: Gledhill's Beatles medley From: KriderSM@aol.com Date: Wed, 25 Nov 1998 19:20:37 EST   Gene Stroble <mightymagic@earthlink.net> wrote: <snip> If you were at the national ATOS convention year before last (in Indiana) you could have heard Simon Gledhill's Beatle's Medley played on the Wayne State (I think, might be wrong) As the kids say in my classes at school Simon was "gett'n jiggy wid it!" In my words it was fantastic! Great organ, great artist and great material! Maybe Simon will record his Fab Four fantasy?<snip>   Simon Gledhill played this medley by those contemporary British composers on the 4/16(?) Grande Page at the Embassy Theatre in Fort Wayne, Indiana. FWIW, that medley received the loudest, longest applause of any of his selections. It was a sea of gray hair in the audience, by the way!!!   WurliStan  
(back) Subject: Re: PBS weekend broadcast on organist shortage From: WRansomeJr@aol.com Date: Wed, 25 Nov 1998 19:26:29 EST   In a message dated 11/25/98 1:02:18 PM Pacific Standard Time, dgoward@uswest.net writes:   > Many musicians in general have a difficult time earning a living in one > place practicing their art -- but this has been common in all the arts since > the first cave painting.   We musicians also face the opinions of many that we are an elitist group, and in many cases this is our own fault. For the past four years I have held TWO part-time church positions as well as a full-time office job. I worked so hard paying the bills that I didn't finish my last three 100 level courses for my BM degree. I was about ready to give up!   But I decided to try to relocate if possible. I do have a lot of years experience in church music, but I didn't expect much to come from my search. I applied for four "big" part-time jobs, and was courted by all four. I was lucky to be offered two of the positions, and one of them was my pick here in California. The people are wonderful, loving, welcoming, and to keep me from having to get a "second" job off site they expanded the job to include some administrative duties (publishing, etc...) and extra hours with the children's ministry, thus making the job full-time. It is a win-win situation! Not ideal maybe, but since I enjoy all these activities it is pretty wonderful.   By team-work and mutual support things are easier to work out!  
(back) Subject: Re: Diaphones From: WRansomeJr@aol.com Date: Wed, 25 Nov 1998 19:29:11 EST   In a message dated 11/25/98 11:13:02 AM Pacific Standard Time, rpinel@theatreorgans.com writes:   > Secondly, JSB probably wouldn't have had any 32 foots at all, so it is not > stylistic to use them for his works (but then......not everybody listens to > style!!!).   Actually, old JSB was acquainted with 32'ers, and encouraged the use of such!! But tis true most of the instruments at his parishes did not have them.  
(back) Subject: Bach and 32' From: Robert Horton <gemshorn@ukans.edu> Date: Wed, 25 Nov 1998 18:49:00 -0600   At 07:29 PM 11/25/98 -0500, WRansomeJr@aol.com wrote: >> Secondly, JSB probably wouldn't have had any 32 foots at all, so it is not >> stylistic to use them for his works (but then......not everybody listens to >> style!!!).   Oh, but he just loved 32' stops! He recommended the addition of a 32' Subbass to the pedal of the organ at St. Blasius in Mulhausen. During his visit to Buxtehude in Lubeck, he was particularly impressed with the 32' Principal and 24' (sic) Gros-Posaune in St. Mary's. There'd be nothing wrong with using a 32' in Bach, assuming the character of the music demands it. I wouldn't use it for the pedal solo in BWV 564 because it would weigh things down too much, but the famous "dracula" chord in the opening of BWV 565 seems to cry out for a 32' plenum.   Robert Horton, Associate Minister of Music St. Lawrence Catholic Campus Center 1800 Engel Road #970, Lawrence, KS 66045 http://falcon.cc.ukans.edu/~gemshorn/   "Nothing is impossible for the man who doesn't have to do it himself."  
(back) Subject: Bach and 32' Stops From: Ben Baldus <bbaldus@voyager.net> Date: Wed, 25 Nov 1998 20:19:19 -0500   Dear Pipe Chatters: I concur with using 32's appropriately in Bach's works. Professor Robert Noehren wrote a couple of articles re: Bach on Large Instruments and focused on the large Hamburg and Luebeck Schnitgers some years ago in "The Diapason." His conclusion was that JSB (like Buxtehude) found such instruments to be very pleasing and rich in sound and gravity. You've probably guessed that I'm not in the 32' Tricher Dulzian crowd.   All the best, Ben Baldus    
(back) Subject: Bach and 32' Stops From: Ben Baldus <bbaldus@voyager.net> Date: Wed, 25 Nov 1998 20:45:04 -0500   Dear Pipe Chatters:   I concur with using 32's appropriately in Bach's works. Professor Robert Noehren wrote a couple of articles re: Bach on Large Instruments and focused on the large Hamburg and Luebeck Schnitgers some years ago in "The Diapason." His conclusion was that JSB (like Buxtehude) found such instruments to be very pleasing and rich in sound and gravity. You've probably guessed that I'm not in the 32' Tricher Dulzian crowd. All the best, Ben Baldus    
(back) Subject: Re: Organs For Theatres and Auditoriums From: Kevin Cartwright <kevin1@alaweb.com> Date: Wed, 25 Nov 1998 19:45:42 -0600   Jon C. Habermaas wrote: > > There have been several posts regarding finding organs for school > auditoriums and Performing Arts Centers. Just received the newsletter > from the Joliet chapter of the ATOS and they report that David Wollagher > recently donated his 3/14 Barton to the Fischer Theatre in Danville, > Il. A picture of the ornate console for this organ has been prominently > featured in the Theatre Organ Home page and the organ was offered for > sale in the classifieds. Anyone hoping to find an organ which could > be donated should contact those who have organs for sale, and request > consideration if the organ doesn't sell. I know from experience that > the former owner of my Wurlitzer was looking for someone who would > take the organ as a donation. Fortunately for me, no one wanted the > organ at that time. Don't be timid about asking...if they're not > interested there's no harm done, and who knows, something could come of > it. > > Just a thought...Happy Thanksgiving all.. > > regards, > > Jon C. Habermaas   I HAVE to comment on this one. John, it's not THAT easy. I hate to hear the organ went to someone else, but I'm glad to hear it will have a good, derserving home. However, MY experience has been terrible. I have been asking and begging...all you can think of...for three months, and only have just over one month left to find an organ for our school, which is ready to give a nice, fat tax write-off. All I have gotten is a bunch of letters that went un-responded to, or a range from a very rude, to a very nice "No."   I just want to know why it works for everyone else, but not ME.   If someone has one they are looking to donate, PLEASE contact me! My alotted time is running out. Aud. plans are going to be set in stone at the beginning of January...that's when the first piece of steel is shoved into the first piece of wet concrete.   Kevin C. kevin1@alaweb.com :'(      
(back) Subject: Organist shortage From: "Judy A. Ollikkala" <71431.2534@compuserve.com> Date: Wed, 25 Nov 1998 20:56:56 -0500   I must mention that the "organist shortage" to be presented on PBS has to do with the lack of organ students and young people interested in becoming organists, which the Berkshire Friends of the Organ group is attempting to address, they are promoting scholarships for organ study for young people, which issue other groups also have addressed, including the Worcester MA AGO Chapter. Judy Ollikkala  
(back) Subject: Re: Organs For Theatres and Auditoriums From: CHERCAPA@aol.com Date: Wed, 25 Nov 1998 21:43:56 EST   Dear Kevin, Possibly you should try to get your hands on an electronic first, build the chambers or whatever and stick the electronic in until someone answers. I have no idea what you are looking for but if you are looking for a III/60 in perfect shape for nothing, you are asking for the moon and things don't work that way these days.If you are lucky, you will get a II/12 that needs work, and that costs money or labor from someone who knows what they are doing. As they say, there is no such thing as a free lunch. I was able to get a two manual Allen, analog, so called obsolete for nothing. It cost me around $700. but we had to engineer the organ out of the choir loft, hire men to manhandle it out, a truck to get it home etc, not including rewirignit when it finally got in the living room. There ww anidentical organ in Dallas that the parish wanted to get rid of for $2500. Paul P. Valtos  
(back) Subject: I've been offended AGAIN... From: Kevin Cartwright <kevin1@alaweb.com> Date: Wed, 25 Nov 1998 21:15:35 -0600   CHERCAPA@aol.com wrote: > > Dear Kevin, Possibly you should try to get your hands on an electronic first, > build the chambers or whatever and stick the electronic in until someone   I have already inquired about electronics, but have had the same results as pipe organs. Basically, all I'm doing *now* is sitting and dreaming that someone will simply "appear" and offer a deal. I've reached the end of my line. I have found no more organs that can "leave the area" or that can "benefit from a tax write-off." I have put hundreds of hours into searching every corner of the internet...and the magazine classifieds...and talking over the phone.   > answers. I have no idea what you are looking for but if you are looking for a > III/60 in perfect shape for nothing, you are asking for the moon and things   Perhaps you are confusing me with with the average happy-go-lucky, dreaming crazy teenager. I actually take offense at the above statement. I am currently waiting to hear from someone about a 2/6 TO, which is the "last straw in the barn." If this deal goes bad, I guess there is no hope.   When obtaining my home practice instrument, I could have placed all these stupid requests for all these companies' contact info. and plans, and actually think I would get a new assembly that was customized for my home. But, no. I got my 3 rank Wicks for $1500 and I still LOVE IT all. Also, other young people think about these organs that are just "perfect." But, mine goes with me when I leave "the house," and [the organ] leaves nothing behind but two small screwholes in the wall (from Bourdon 16' piperack), and an indention in the carpet.   > don't work that way these days.If you are lucky, you will get a II/12 that > needs work, and that costs money or labor from someone who knows what they are > doing. As they say, there is no such thing as a free lunch. I was able to get   I happen to know what I am doing, and can do most labor tasks. However, I do hire people to take care of my own pipeorgan, because I don't want it to be the subject of my hobby. I want it to work every minute of every day. As well, I very well know that no one gets a free lunch, and if they do, they cheat. From my point of view, a 2/12 would be a blessing from above.   I feel bad enough already, please do not further complicate it by flaming. Several so-called friends have already turned the other way with this issue and a few other issues that deal with theatre organs.   Kevin C. kevin1@alaweb.com        
(back) Subject: Re: Organist shortage From: "Karl E. Moyer" <kmoyer@marauder.millersv.edu> Date: Wed, 25 Nov 1998 23:06:50 -0500 (EST)     I hope I do not repeat myself from an earlier post I've forgot I shared.   I'm convinced that a major factor in the organist shortage is the great decline in youngsters taking piano lessons. It has several aspects:   1. a "couch-potato" attitude resulting from TV et al, as opposed to an attitude of doing things one's self.   2. the current--and to my mind WONDERFUL--emphasis on recreational athletics which, among other things, coutners the "couch-potato" culture at least a bit and is to the physical well-being of all of us. Bt it often takes too much time form things like practicing the piano, is more socially-rewarding and is more "fun." They think it's a *paino* instead.   3. parents' preference for spending $$$ on things that also entertain THEM, something a piano and its maintenance often will not do.   Each fall I put a messge in my parish newsletter to the effect that "Our organist has resigned; now our church needs a new organist!" Boy, does that get people's attention!!! :-) The article then goes on to state the life-long values of piano studies, including that out of all those piano students will come a certain percentage of organ students--and that when the pool of piano students is so small, the same percentage of organ students now yields a very small number of future organists. Piano teachers LOVE IT, of course--how to ingratiate your town's piano teachers to you!!! It's not the only cause of the organist shortage, of course, but I'm convinced it *is* one of them.   Cordially, Karl E. Moyer Lancaster PA    
(back) Subject: Re: I've been offended AGAIN. From: ORGANUT@aol.com Date: Wed, 25 Nov 1998 23:42:45 EST   Kevin,   Follow your dream Son. Don't let anyone discourage you. Persevere is the watchword. I wish there were more young people who shared your enthusiasm. I am pullin for you, and wish you success. I believe you can make it happen! Later, Phil L.