PipeChat Digest #612 - Friday, November 27, 1998
 
Re: RE: Console Specs
  by <Cantuar@aol.com>
Re: Organists salary
  by "Kevin Cartwright" <kevin1@alaweb.com>
RE: Peaceful co-existance
  by "Robert Horton" <gemshorn@ukans.edu>
Co-existing pipe organs
  by "Judy A. Ollikkala" <71431.2534@compuserve.com>
Recital Notice, Hamilton, NJ
  by <Oboe32@aol.com>
RE: Console Specs
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com>
[Fwd: BETHLEHEM OF PA Note 1679 by INTERNET]
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com>
Unreliable paycheck for organists
  by <KriderSM@aol.com>
Re: Console Specs
  by <WRansomeJr@aol.com>
RE: Peaceful co-existance
  by "Dennis Goward" <dgoward@uswest.net>
Re: Peaceful co-existance
  by <WRansomeJr@aol.com>
Re: RE: Console Specs
  by <Afreed0904@aol.com>
Re: Console Specs
  by <WRansomeJr@aol.com>
Re: Console Specs
  by <WRansomeJr@aol.com>
Paychecks, Practicing, Eucharistic worship
  by "Bud" <budchris@earthlink.net>
Re: Paychecks, Practicing, Eucharistic worship
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@truelink.net>
Organ Posts
  by "Greg McAusland" <gregorymca@pavilion.co.uk>
Re: Organ Posts
  by "Kevin Cartwright" <kevin1@alaweb.com>
Re: Tierce mixtures and Carillon mixtures - not the Shrine in DC
  by <RMaryman@aol.com>
Re: Tierce mixtures and Carillon mixtures - not the Shrine in DC
  by <ScottFop@aol.com>
Re: Tierce mixtures and Carillon mixtures - not the Shrine in DC
  by <WRansomeJr@aol.com>
Rochester TOS Concert on Dec. 5 (Cross-posted)
  by "Ken Evans" <kevans1@rochester.rr.com>
Naughty Marietta
  by "Kevin Cartwright" <kevin1@alaweb.com>
David Wollaeger
  by "Kevin Cartwright" <kevin1@alaweb.com>
Curley/Hazelton Recital Nov. 29
  by <DudelK@aol.com>
Re: Organists salary
  by <HOLYMUSIC@aol.com>
need info
  by "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net>
 


(back) Subject: Re: RE: Console Specs From: Cantuar@aol.com Date: Fri, 27 Nov 1998 07:21:57 EST     In a message dated 11/27/98 2:04:45 AM, cremona84000@webtv.net writes:   <<A worthy idea; however, usually when a new organ goes in an old one goes out! In addition, it quite a bit easier to move a Rembrant than a Skinner! But a good idea nevertheless. Being the wierd person what I am...... I would rather have several small organs of differing character than one huge mammoth that supposedly "encompassed" them all.   ........................bruce cornely........................>>   So, Bruce - What you are saying is that you would like a Hammond in one corner, and an Allen with card reader in another, with a Baldwin for special occasions, and perhaps an Ahlborn-Galanti Liepzig for Bach. Do I have it right? Travers Koerner  
(back) Subject: Re: Organists salary From: Kevin Cartwright <kevin1@alaweb.com> Date: Fri, 27 Nov 1998 08:00:10 -0600   bruce cornely wrote:   > Kevin.... you play for a Methodist church, right? > Well, don't get MAD! get EVEN! > > >become and Episcopalian! ;-)   No, I play for a small Baptist church in the middle of nowhere. I am a member of the FUMC here in Greenville, where I play every now and then when the very dedicated organist is out sick, or I tell her to take her anniversary off...and I'll take care of the service. Years ago, I did get even with the Baptist Church, I became A Methodist! The First Baptist Church here in town IS looking for a full-time organist. You know...I can ALWAYS get even with the Southern Baptist Church by going to the First Baptist Church!! Hehehehehe... BTW: FBC of Greenville has a 2/13 Estey...a real pipe organ. Not a 1996 Allen that is a piece of crap.   Anyway,   Kevin C. kevin1@alaweb.com        
(back) Subject: RE: Peaceful co-existance From: Robert Horton <gemshorn@ukans.edu> Date: Fri, 27 Nov 1998 08:34:41 -0600   At 12:42 AM 11/27/98 -0700, you wrote: >Let me propose a radical thought -- to quote Mr. King, can't we all just get >along? French Trackers, German Classics, American Classic, whatever -- how >about "peaceful co-existance"? (another original phrase, right). I think it >would be great to be able to enjoy music on an American Classic, The only question that I'd pose is...outside of Leo Sowerby, what serious literature is there that was written for the "American Classic" organ? or for that matter...electropneumatic classical organs in general? We tried this as an exercise in class one time and we couldn't come up with very many.   Cheers, Robert Horton, Associate Minister of Music St. Lawrence Catholic Campus Center 1800 Engel Road #970, Lawrence, KS 66045 http://falcon.cc.ukans.edu/~gemshorn/   Q. Why don't blind people skydive? A. Because it scares the dog.  
(back) Subject: Co-existing pipe organs From: "Judy A. Ollikkala" <71431.2534@compuserve.com> Date: Fri, 27 Nov 1998 10:03:16 -0500   Going up and down the street to hear different organ sounds is what I try to do on my organ crawls. However this has become more and more difficult, due to the rebuilding which is going on. Here in New England, which still has many pipe organs, the rebuilding craze is on, to make something more eclectic, or more French romantic (yes), or more classical. So the vintage organs in original condition are becoming rarer by the day.   Judy Ollikkala  
(back) Subject: Recital Notice, Hamilton, NJ From: Oboe32@aol.com Date: Fri, 27 Nov 1998 10:41:41 EST   Twas the Night Before Christmas and all through the house, not a creature was sturring, not even a mouse. The stockings were hung by the chimney with care, in hopes that St. Nic would soon be there. I lept to my bed in hopes of some sleep, but then came a noise with such great force and 32 feet. Not knowing what was afoot, I sprang to the window to see what was the matter. I saw nothing but the faint glow of the local rose window. Thoughts sprang to my mind, knowing the church had a grand old mighty Wicks, I knew we were all in for a treat. I woke the children, threw open the sash, tore open the shutters, and heard the great blast!   You are all cordially invited to celebrate an American Christmas with me on Sunday December 6th, 1997 at 3:30pm in the afternoon. Transcriptions abound on the mighty Wicks. It is truly a color machine, and I'll bring them all out! There is no charge for the recital, just a free-will donation. I'll be playing everything from early American manuals pieces to slushy transcriptions, and maybe a theater call from Rudolph or Frosty. St. Anthony of Padua RC Church is located in Hamilton Square, NJ. This is directly next to Trenton and Ewing, NJ. The church can be reached via route 295 North or South. The exit is exit 61B. Proceed through the first light, and bear left at the second light. You then proceed through through the next few lights until you come upon a massive stone church on the right hand side of the road. This would be St. Anthony's. We'll be having open console afterwards. It is a very nicely voiced 35 ranks in 4 seconds of acoustic. It is very heavy, 6 16's and is not unified aside from the flutes. It has great strings, and is a pleasure to hear and play. My best to all for a great holiday!   Regards,   Pete Isherwood  
(back) Subject: RE: Console Specs From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com> Date: Fri, 27 Nov 1998 09:44:10 -0600 (CST)   At 03:03 AM 11/27/98 -0500, Bruce Cornely wrote:   >I would rather have several small organs of differing >character than one huge mammoth that supposedly "encompassed" them all.   I am 100% with you on that one, Bruce. The idea of having only one organ at least in large churches, is a fairly new one. In the fifteenth century you would probably have found at least three organs in an English cathedral, none of them very large. The largest would be the one on the pulpitum (choir screen) and would only be used during the Great Fifty Days of Easter. It would have doors which would be kept shut the rest of the year. There would be a second instrument used on festivals of the Blessed Virgin Mary, and a third instrument for everyday use. No organs at all would be used in Lent.   In large French churches there is often an Orgue to Choeur (Choir Organ) in the chancel as well as a Grand Orgue (Great Organ) at the west end. The little Orgue de Choeur is generally used for service accompaniment and the Grand Orgue for concert purposes. This is another reason why it is not a good idea to make reproduction Cavaill=E9-Coll Grandes Orgues for church organs in the U.S., though some firms like Schoenstein have been making instruments based on Cavaill=E9-Coll Orgues de Choeur, which is a much= better idea.   For my part I would like to have at least two organs in a church. A romantic or even symphonic style of instrument for modern music -- something along Skinner lines would do nicely, or perhaps something along the lines of an E. & G. G. Hook. And a small tracker organ -- one manual and pedal would probably be adequate -- tuned to 1/4-comma meantone temperament, for renaissance music. I increasingly cannot bear to hear renaissance music sung in equal temperament!   Another reason for favoring a plurality of small organs over a single eclectic one, is that as an organbuilder I find the design of a versatile small organ much more of a challenge, and as an organist I find it much more rewarding to explore the resources of a small instrument and devise ways of playing different kinds of music. This is another of the joys of organ playing that has been obfuscated by the modern fixation with pistons.   John.=20    
(back) Subject: [Fwd: BETHLEHEM OF PA Note 1679 by INTERNET] From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com> Date: Fri, 27 Nov 1998 09:54:38 -0600 (CST)   Forwarded from the Bethlehem diocesan list:   Date: Tue, 24 Nov 1998 11:04:20 -0500 From: Bill Lewellis <blewellis@diobeth.org> Subject: New Austin Organ delivered to Cathedral Bcc: bethlehem.of.pa.topic   NEW AUSTIN ORGAN DELIVERED TO CATHEDRAL   The Cathedral Church of the Nativity [Bethlehem, Pa.] took delivery of its new Austin, Opus 2776 Organ on Monday, Nov. 2.   "This is no ordinary instrument," said choirmaster/organist Russell Jackson. "It is a true Cathedral Organ, designed to accompany our great Anglican Choral Tradition, perform any school of organ literature, and speak with a voice of authority that encourages and inspires the mind and heart of all who hear it."   For days the Cathedral was full of chests, reservoirs, enormous pipes, blowers -- all of which took seven men five hours to unload. By Sunday the main structure was installed in the chamber, with bass pipes and pipe-trays stored in the north aisle. Construction will take one month and voicing and tonal finishing will take another month.   "We hope to be able to use the organ for the first time at the Christmas Eve services," Jackson said. There will be a large-scale dedication and Inaugural Recital on Sunday, January 10, at 5 p.m.   ***************** ***************** Bill Lewellis, Communication Minister/Editor, Diocese of Bethlehem Be attentive. Be intelligent. Be reasonable. Be responsible. Be loving. Develop and, if necessary, change. --Bernard Lonergan                
(back) Subject: Unreliable paycheck for organists From: KriderSM@aol.com Date: Fri, 27 Nov 1998 10:54:48 EST   Hi List, Perhaps those churches ought to face organists that are just as unreliable; showing up for part of the service, stopping the organ in the middle of the anthem, playing off-beat rhythms, or using "Buddy, Can You Spare a Dime" as the offeratory... :-)   WurliStan  
(back) Subject: Re: Console Specs From: WRansomeJr@aol.com Date: Fri, 27 Nov 1998 11:08:21 EST   In a message dated 11/26/98 11:43:47 PM Pacific Standard Time, dgoward@uswest.net writes: > Let me propose a radical thought -- to quote Mr. King, can't we all just get > along? French Trackers, German Classics, American Classic, whatever -- how > about "peaceful co-existance"? (another original phrase, right). I think it > would be great to be able to enjoy music on an American Classic, then cross > the street to hear the Bedient, and maybe go a few more blocks and listen to the > Phelps Casavant (shoot me if you must -- I did like them). After all, does > the art museum throw out all the Van Goghs when the Rembrant show comes to town? Oh, I agree! I started playing in 1980, the end of the baroque craze. My school had several Schlicker practice organs (really quite nice) and a Flentrop even with ruckpositiv in the small recital hall. And a big 4/65 1930 Skinner with mixtures on great, swell and pedal, as well as 32' open, Bdn, and Bombarde--wonderful instrument. But the year after I came it was replaced by a Holtkamp (in the big Auditorium). I will have to say that the big Bedient in my other post just did not fit that room. It was LOUD! Really the mixtures were what bugged me, too loud for my taste.   My interest is in church playing, and here the need is for hymn playing and choral accompaniment priority wise, and this is where I feel we need to be careful. My definition of American Classic is probably broad too. I played a Visser Rowland tracker the other day that was marvelous and could play almost anything! It coaxed the music from me! However, a slavish copy of an early style seems inappropriate in a church situation, but once more, it's only my opinion, and I don't need everyone to agree!!!   I also don't agree in replacing what are very good instruments (as in the case at my college above) every time tastes change. ADD to the collection!! There is a fabulous Phelps 4/80'ish at Huntsville, Alabama's FBC--in great acoustics too. The church also has a big carillon.  
(back) Subject: RE: Peaceful co-existance From: "Dennis Goward" <dgoward@uswest.net> Date: Fri, 27 Nov 1998 09:14:01 -0700   > what serious > literature is there that was written for the "American Classic" organ? or > for that matter...electropneumatic classical organs in general?   The organ has existed for hundreds of years, and has gone through hundreds of incarnations in that time -- why must any literature be limited to one particular style of organ, and why can't any organ be used for any literature?   There are organists who play primative music on the latest and greatest, Bach on theatre organs, etc. Why limit the organ?   Well, I guess if all you have is big boom and little boom in the pedal, it does limit your resources for pedal solos -- but there's a lot more out there.   I've said it before, and I'll say it again, I don't think that all music has to be interpreted strictly based on what the composer had available.   Dennis    
(back) Subject: Re: Peaceful co-existance From: WRansomeJr@aol.com Date: Fri, 27 Nov 1998 11:15:33 EST   In a message dated 11/27/98 6:35:34 AM Pacific Standard Time, gemshorn@ukans.edu writes:   > The only question that I'd pose is...outside of Leo Sowerby, what serious > literature is there that was written for the "American Classic" organ? or > for that matter...electropneumatic classical organs in general? > We tried this as an exercise in class one time and we couldn't come up > with very many.     There may not be much "literature" written for them. I am not saying they even have to be EP, but ANY new organ in a church situation needs to be eclectic enough to play the spectrum of literature--from early to Sowerby. Leaving out extream notes may exclude one or two pieces, and that is fine, but do not exclude a celeste, and do not have something that sounds like mice running all over the place because of exaggerated chiff, that is all I am saying.  
(back) Subject: Re: RE: Console Specs From: Afreed0904@aol.com Date: Fri, 27 Nov 1998 11:18:33 EST     In a message dated 11.27.98 10:45:31 AM, jlspeller@stlnet.com writes:   << The idea of having only one organ at   least in large churches, is a fairly new one. In the fifteenth century you   would probably have found at least three organs in an English cathedral,   none of them very large. >>   John:   Very similar in Sweden. Village churches, or churches out in the open countryside, have just one, in the west gallery. But churches in market towns or what we might call "county seat towns" have the big one up aft, but a smaller tracker freestanding on the nave floor up near or in the chancel. City churches similarly, or even more.   Alan Freed  
(back) Subject: Re: Console Specs From: WRansomeJr@aol.com Date: Fri, 27 Nov 1998 11:21:05 EST   In a message dated 11/27/98 7:45:35 AM Pacific Standard Time, jlspeller@stlnet.com writes:   > > Another reason for favoring a plurality of small organs over a single > eclectic one, is that as an organbuilder I find the design of a versatile > small organ much more of a challenge, and as an organist I find it much more > rewarding to explore the resources of a small instrument and devise ways of > playing different kinds of music. This is another of the joys of organ > playing that has been obfuscated by the modern fixation with pistons. >   As long as an institution has an instrument suited to modern music and playing styles I am all for the baroque/mean-tone in one transcept and the french classic in the other !!  
(back) Subject: Re: Console Specs From: WRansomeJr@aol.com Date: Fri, 27 Nov 1998 11:23:11 EST   In a message dated 11/27/98 7:45:35 AM Pacific Standard Time, jlspeller@stlnet.com writes:   > > For my part I would like to have at least two organs in a church. A > romantic or even symphonic style of instrument for modern music -- something > along Skinner lines would do nicely, or perhaps something along the lines of > an E. & G. G. Hook. And a small tracker organ -- one manual and pedal would > probably be adequate -- tuned to 1/4-comma meantone temperament, for > renaissance music. I increasingly cannot bear to hear renaissance music > sung in equal temperament! > Is it not wonderful what places like Duke University can do, having the Aeolian at one end and Flentrop at the other, and even showing in the recordings how each instrument can handle many styles of literature. <brain working now, I think>  
(back) Subject: Paychecks, Practicing, Eucharistic worship From: Bud <budchris@earthlink.net> Date: Fri, 27 Nov 1998 08:24:54 -0800   PAYCHECKS   I've given 44 years of my life to the service of Christ and His church. I will never be able to retire ... I can't afford to. I don't mind being poor, but I deeply resent insinuations that I am less than committed to Our Lord because I find something just a tad inequitable about a church paying $20K for a "full-time" position when the average income of the congregation is $100K and the Rector's salary is $75K (plus full benefits: housing, car, health, etc.). I'm good at what I do; I deserve to be paid accordingly.   PRACTICING   Whenever I get a frantic call from a church that's looking for an organist (and I get a lot of those calls here in Southern California), I always ask them how many students they have practicing on their organ. Some actually get the point of the question.   Regarding the church with a fine tracker organ that wrote all kinds of ridiculous restrictions into the organist's contract (including what stops may and may not be used in the very limited amount of time that practice IS allowed): most clergy ( Roman and Anglican) who came through the seminary system since Vatican II majored in ignorance and minored in arrogance. Having demolished the liturgy, they have now set upon the music with similar intent. They have their reward ...   EUCHARISTIC WORSHIP   This is an argument that's never going to be settled. But I'm puzzled by the statement that eucharistic worship severely limits one's ability to communicate with God on a personal basis, particularly during the Canon (Prayer of Consecration, Eucharistic Prayer) ... I talk to God all during the Mass, and PARTICULARLY during the Canon ... I guess I assumed that everybody else did too. Right now, having watched the movie on the Holocaust yesterday, I'm pretty mad with Him, and He's gonna hear about it on Sunday. And I am NOT convinced (as Earnest Young Rector pontificated a few weeks ago) that it's the Devil who's making me ask God why He allowed the Holocaust to happen. I happen to think God's reply to Job is pretty arrogant, even for the Old Testament.   Lest anyone think I didn't get enough turkey ... I spent Thanksgiving with my wonderful extended family, the Parish Squirrelly Cantorum, in which everybody's related to everybody else, and there are gonna be enough grandkids for TWO children's choirs in a few years. We sang, and we feasted; then my cantor and his brother loaded up two minivans with food and clothes for the orphanages in Tijuana (a good three-hour drive away) and took off to deliver same. To my way of thinking, THAT was both an extension of and a response to the Eucharist we celebrated the night before.   Regards,   Bud Clark St. Matthew's Newport Beach CA USA    
(back) Subject: Re: Paychecks, Practicing, Eucharistic worship From: Bob Scarborough <desertbob@truelink.net> Date: Fri, 27 Nov 1998 10:12:02 -0800   At 08:24 AM 11/27/98 -0800, Bud wrote: >PAYCHECKS<snip>   Hear, hear! Your points are the best to be made on this thread to date!   DeserTBoB    
(back) Subject: Organ Posts From: Greg McAusland <gregorymca@pavilion.co.uk> Date: Fri, 27 Nov 1998 19:21:28 -0000   Re: Kevin Cartwright   I never take on an organist's post unless I get a clear contract and I = know that I am in charge of the music. Here in the U.K. sometimes the = organist and choirmaster post is split between two musicians. I have = often come across the 'musical director' without experience of organ = playing or even being able to play the piano. In my view, I think it is = necessary for the 'musician in charge' to have experience in organ = accompaniment then one is aware of many of the issues surrounding = congregational singing and accompaniment of the choir.   I have come across many amateur 'music directors' in churches who may = think they know what they are doing, but are clearly making fundamental = error any organist would spot.   The worst time I ever had concerning payment of organ fees was when I = was organist for a parish church and the treasurer was a sweet lady in = her 80's. She had forgotten one month, and because I was too shy and = afraid of appearing mercenary - I went without food for one whole week. = Things weren't all bad, soon after, three bookings for weddings came in = all intending to have their ceremonies professionally video-recorded = (performing right fee for organist means double the 'goodies'!)  
(back) Subject: Re: Organ Posts From: Kevin Cartwright <kevin1@alaweb.com> Date: Fri, 27 Nov 1998 13:31:58 -0600   Greg McAusland wrote: > > Re: Kevin Cartwright > ctor' without experience of organ playing or even being able to play the piano. In my view, I think it is   My teacher, who is organist/choirmaster, will not hire a "music director" that can not play the piano at the least. The first question is "What is your keyboard experience?" The answer is what determines their fate.   Kevin C. kevin1@alweb.com      
(back) Subject: Re: Tierce mixtures and Carillon mixtures - not the Shrine in DC From: RMaryman@aol.com Date: Fri, 27 Nov 1998 14:55:24 EST   The Organ I was referring to is the Kilgen where Scott Foppiano plays. I forget the location but is in the upper MidWest. The organ is a large historic and mostly original intact example of Kilgen's work. He has posted the question about tierce mixtures that I was addressing.   the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception is indeed in Washington DC and is Moller from 1964 of 104 ranks...an organ that I am quite familiar with.   Rick M  
(back) Subject: Re: Tierce mixtures and Carillon mixtures - not the Shrine in DC From: ScottFop@aol.com Date: Fri, 27 Nov 1998 15:53:29 EST   In a message dated 11/27/98 2:57:00 PM Eastern Standard Time, RMaryman@aol.com writes:   << The Organ I was referring to is the Kilgen where Scott Foppiano plays. I forget the location but is in the upper MidWest. The organ is a large historic and mostly original intact example of Kilgen's work. He has posted the question about tierce mixtures that I was addressing.   Actually the organ is a TOTALLY original Kilgen (regarding pipework, winding and chests) with the exception of the relay which has been converted to Peterson. The church, which is the National Shrine of the Little Flower, is in Royal Oak, Michigan which is a suburb of Detroit- located 12 miles north of downtown.   Scott F. Foppiano, Director of Music and Liturgical Coordinator National Shrine of the Little Flower, Royal Oak, MI  
(back) Subject: Re: Tierce mixtures and Carillon mixtures - not the Shrine in DC From: WRansomeJr@aol.com Date: Fri, 27 Nov 1998 17:44:48 EST   In a message dated 11/27/98 12:55:03 PM Pacific Standard Time, ScottFop@aol.com writes:   > Actually the organ is a TOTALLY original Kilgen (regarding pipework, winding > and chests) with the exception of the relay which has been converted to > Peterson.   I'd still love to see the stoplist!  
(back) Subject: Rochester TOS Concert on Dec. 5 (Cross-posted) From: "Ken Evans" <kevans1@rochester.rr.com> Date: Fri, 27 Nov 1998 18:56:46 -0500   The Rochester (NY) Theater Organ Society is proud to present the very-talented and famed theater organist Dan Bellomy on Saturday, December 5th. The console of the RTOS 4/22 Wurlitzer Opus 1951, with Dan on the bench, will rise at 8 p.m. in the 2574-seat Auditorium Center. The ticket price is only $10 each for non-members and free to 1998 and 1999 RTOS members. The box office will open at 7 p.m. and the inside theater doors will swing open at 7:15.   Driving directions from east, west and south (Lake Ontario is in the north) to the Auditorium Center at 875 Main St. East in Rochester and Dan Bellomy's biog.. information, membership info., lots of pictures of pipes and the recently restored console plus the 4/22 stoplist can be found at http://theatreorgans.com/rochestr/.   We hope to see you here on Dec. 5 for an evening of outstanding theater pipe organ entertainment!   Regards, Ken Evans-RTOS Director    
(back) Subject: Naughty Marietta From: Kevin Cartwright <kevin1@alaweb.com> Date: Fri, 27 Nov 1998 17:11:56 -0600   Can anyone supply contact information for the owner of the 2/10 theatre organ commonly known as "Naughty Marietta?" Anyone's help would be greatly appreciated.   Thanks,   Kevin C. kevin1@alaweb.com        
(back) Subject: David Wollaeger From: Kevin Cartwright <kevin1@alaweb.com> Date: Fri, 27 Nov 1998 17:49:50 -0600   Could anyone supply me with contact info for David Wollaeger?   Thanks,   Kevin Cartwright kevin1@alaweb.com        
(back) Subject: Curley/Hazelton Recital Nov. 29 From: DudelK@aol.com Date: Fri, 27 Nov 1998 19:48:28 EST   FYI -- from the Washington Post: Carlo Curley and Tom Hazelton will apear on Sunday, Nov. 29 at Vienna Presbyterian Church, 124 Park St. NE, Vienna, Va. The program features the church's 3-manual Schantz and an Allen Renaissance Organ. Admission free. For directions (703) 938-9050.   Also noted: J. Peterman is offering "The Original Yankee Stadium Organ with Bench" for $7500. From the illustration, it appears to be a Hammond with drawbars and stop tabs of some sort.  
(back) Subject: Re: Organists salary From: HOLYMUSIC@aol.com Date: Fri, 27 Nov 1998 19:54:24 EST   I wonder if the funeral homes feel the same way about this????  
(back) Subject: need info From: "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net> Date: Fri, 27 Nov 1998 20:14:17 -0500   Hi, all... Can anyone supply me information on a Koehnken and Grimm tracker that was in St. Mary's Catholic Church in Milhausen, Indiana? It was removed @ 1938 and replaced with a Wicks 2/4 cabinet organ. Thank you, Rick dutchorgan@svs.net