PipeChat Digest #613 - Saturday, November 28, 1998
 
Re: RE: Console Specs
  by "bruce cornely" <cremona84000@webtv.net>
``Orgelwerke'' December listings
  by "Bonnie Beth Derby" <orge@dreamscape.com>
Re: Organists salary
  by "bruce cornely" <cremona84000@webtv.net>
Kilgen in OK. City?
  by "Frank Johnson" <usd465@horizon.hit.net>
Opus 190
  by "Frank Johnson" <usd465@horizon.hit.net>
RE: Console Specs
  by "bruce cornely" <cremona84000@webtv.net>
Re: RE: Console Specs
  by <Afreed0904@aol.com>
RE: Peaceful co-existance
  by "bruce cornely" <cremona84000@webtv.net>
Re: Peaceful co-existance
  by "bruce cornely" <cremona84000@webtv.net>
Re: RE: Console Specs
  by "bruce cornely" <cremona84000@webtv.net>
Re: Peaceful co-existance
  by <WRansomeJr@aol.com>
RE: Peaceful co-existance
  by "Dennis Goward" <dgoward@uswest.net>
Old church and lighthouse
  by "Judy A. Ollikkala" <71431.2534@compuserve.com>
 


(back) Subject: Re: RE: Console Specs From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Fri, 27 Nov 1998 21:45:41 -0500 (EST)     >So, Bruce - >What you are saying is that you would like a > Hammond in one corner, and an Allen with > card reader in another, with a Baldwin for > special occasions, and perhaps an > Ahlborn-Galanti Liepzig for Bach. Do I have it > right? Ah! dear Travers. You forgot the refreshments. With a selection of instruments like that I would feel the need for some caviar, preferably served on nice sharp razor blades! hehehe   ........................bruce cornely........................ o o o o ______________ o o o o d o g s ______________ o o h o o a o o ______________ o o p s   ............. cremona84000@webtv.net ............     No one appreciates the very special genius of your conversation as a dog does. -- Christopher Morley    
(back) Subject: ``Orgelwerke'' December listings From: "Bonnie Beth Derby" <orge@dreamscape.com> Date: Fri, 27 Nov 1998 21:50:24 -0500   Greetings to all,   Here are the December listings for ``Orgelwerke'' on Classic FM (WCNY-FM, Syracuse; WUNY-FM, Utica; and WJNY-FM, in Watertown) - Sunday nights from 8pm to 9pm:   Sunday, December 6th - A Christmas Festival, Part I - Holiday Organ Music on Two ``Classic'' American Instruments. The first is the 1830 two-manual tracker organ built by John Appleton of Boston and now housed in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City. Organist Martin Souter plays Christmas selections by Bach, Handel, Brahms, Liszt, Daquin, and Ireland. The second American ``classic'' organ is the five-manual Aeolian-Skinner instrument in the Mormon Tabernacle, Salt Lake City. An historic performance of traditional holiday music featuring Alexander Schreiner, organist, will be offered.   Sunday, December 13th - A Christmas Festival, Part II - Romantic Noels of Alexander Guilmant. From a recent CD release, organist Agnes Armstrong performs a number of Noels by Guilmant on the Akerman & Lund organ of 1995 located in the Kallio Church in Helsinki, Finland.   Sunday, December 20th - A Christmas Festival, Part III - Music for a Merry Christmas with E. Power Biggs and the Columbia Chamber Orchestra. A wonderful Sony CD re-release featuring a 1963 holiday recording performed by E. Power Biggs on the historic organ in the Stadtpfarrkirche, Eisenstadt, Austria, with the Columbia Chamber Orchestra, Zoltan Rozsnyai conducting. A number of favorite carols will be presented in superb arrangements by Daniel Pinkham. Also included in the hour: two Christmas gems with E. Power Biggs and the Texas Boys Choir of Fort Worth.   Sunday, December 27th - A Christmas Festival, Part IV - Bach for Christmas. We close out the season with Christmas selections of Johann Sebastian Bach, including his Canonic Variations on ``Vom Himmel hoch'', the Pastorale, and seasonal Chorale-Preludes from the ``Orgelbuchlein''.   Best regards,   Bonnie Beth Derby Syracuse, New York orge@dreamscape.com      
(back) Subject: Re: Organists salary From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Fri, 27 Nov 1998 21:50:47 -0500 (EST)   Wow! Heigh thee to First Baptist and that 2/13 Estey. Sounds wunnerful. But don't do it for revenge.... do it because you deserve it.   ........................bruce cornely........................ o o o o ______________ o o o o d o g s ______________ o o h o o a o o ______________ o o p s   ............. cremona84000@webtv.net ............     No one appreciates the very special genius of your conversation as a dog does. -- Christopher Morley    
(back) Subject: Kilgen in OK. City? From: usd465@horizon.hit.net (Frank Johnson) Date: Fri, 27 Nov 1998 21:00:38 -0500   Is there anyone on the list that has knowledge of the condition of the Kilgen organ that used to be in the WKY studios in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma? I know that it was removed from the studios years ago and was installed in a civic auditorium in OK City. It was allowed to run down and in dire need of work and then the organ was restored. The was a number of years ago. My first live theater organ experience was one Sunday afternoon when my parents drove from Kiowa, Kansas to Oklahoma City for lunch. We then went to the Skirvin (sp) Towers and hear Ken Wright play the Kilgen on his Sunday afternoon show. What a thrill. (I have a recording of Mr. Wright and that organ.) My questions are: Does it still play? Is it used? Is there a concert series? and....What else can anyone tell me about that fine sounding Kilgen?   I'd appreciate any infomation you could share with me.   Thanks   Frank   Frank R. Johnson (KA0API) Spirit of New Orleans - clarinet/leader http://www.hit.net/~usd465/ 1922 E. 14th Winfield, KS 67156      
(back) Subject: Opus 190 From: usd465@horizon.hit.net (Frank Johnson) Date: Fri, 27 Nov 1998 21:12:24 -0500   I have the album "Opus 190" with organist Frederick Hohman playing the Ernest M. Skinner in the Grand Avenue United Methodist Temple at Kansas City, Missouri. Can somone tell me about the recent damage I've heard about to the organ? I understand that one division was totally destroyed by water. Please let me hear about it.   Frank   Frank R. Johnson (KA0API) Spirit of New Orleans - clarinet/leader http://www.hit.net/~usd465/ 1922 E. 14th Winfield, KS 67156      
(back) Subject: RE: Console Specs From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Fri, 27 Nov 1998 22:24:24 -0500 (EST)   Right back atcha, John. In addition, having several small organs would also simply maintenance. I have really enjoyed listening to and playing smaller organs. That is one of the greatest benefits of being in OHS that I have found: learning the magnificence of the small organ. I would really like to have a 19th Century American type instrument for literature and big hymns, a small 2m Silberman style for Baroque and a 1m meantone in the choir for service music; and a small 2m French Classic in a triforium bay. Yummy!   ........................bruce cornely........................ o o o o ______________ o o o o d o g s ______________ o o h o o a o o ______________ o o p s   ............. cremona84000@webtv.net ............     No one appreciates the very special genius of your conversation as a dog does. -- Christopher Morley    
(back) Subject: Re: RE: Console Specs From: Afreed0904@aol.com Date: Fri, 27 Nov 1998 22:31:11 EST     In a message dated 11.27.98 10:25:44 PM, cremona84000@webtv.net writes:   <<I would really like to have a 19th Century American type instrument for literature and big hymns, a small 2m Silberman style for Baroque and a 1m meantone in the choir for service music; and a small 2m French Classic in a triforium bay. >>   Plus perhaps an elevator and a fire-house pole?   Alan Freed  
(back) Subject: RE: Peaceful co-existance From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Fri, 27 Nov 1998 22:35:15 -0500 (EST)   Part of what a composer does is in response to the instrument for which the music is composed. Early music exploited the unique tuning systems of those organs. I never enjoyed Buxtehude, Bohm or Bruhns until I experienced it on unequal temperament. Now the organ I play is tuned to Valotti, which is comparatively mild, although I had it slightly "adjusted" so that C major was a pure as we could get it, which made some of the "outer" keys more severe (and MORE wonderful). French classic music not only benefits from unequal temperament, but also from the dramatic reed colours of the period. By the same token, Sowerby, Elgar, Rheinberger and Guilmant need the scratchy strings, more elegant reed voices and broad voicing. All of these things cannot be found successfully in one instrument if it is going to have cohesion of its own; rather the instruments simply lose character rather than taking on a character of its own. Sure, any music can be played on any organ and may be enjoyable to an extent, but to not only enjoy, but experience the music, the uniqueness of the instrument and the characteristics which partially inspired the music should also be present.   ........................bruce cornely........................ o o o o ______________ o o o o d o g s ______________ o o h o o a o o ______________ o o p s   ............. cremona84000@webtv.net ............     No one appreciates the very special genius of your conversation as a dog does. -- Christopher Morley    
(back) Subject: Re: Peaceful co-existance From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Fri, 27 Nov 1998 22:54:17 -0500 (EST)   >...but ANY new organ in a church situation > needs to be eclectic enough to play the > spectrum of literature--from early to Sowerby. this is precisely the attitude which causes churches to purchase a large imitation instrument which can "play everything" albeit poorly or in simulation, rather than get a real organ which only appears to be limited to those who have not learned how to use them. I heard William Porter play a recital on a 1/9 A.David Moore tracker Sunday night. That organ has more color on it than the 2/21 Moller that I play at my position. It has very colorful flutes, warm and rich principals, a gorgeous cornet and a cromorne, all sitting atop a very solid but not dominating Subbass in the pedal. There is music that would be very difficult or impossible to play on it, but that is not a terrible sacrifice to make for such a beautiful sound. Even parts of the Franck chorales are luscious on it.   > Leaving out extream notes may exclude one > or two pieces, and that is fine, but do not > exclude a celeste, Anyone who does not believe an organ can be beautiful, rich, luscious and romantic without a celeste needs to go to an OHS convention an hear some small early American instruments without celestes that have exquisite soft registers. Celestes are far too overused these days.   > and do not have something that sounds like > mice running all over the place because of > exaggerated chiff.... I do agree with you here, but exaggerated chiff is almost a thing of the past, and was a mistake that most builders made in the "Baroque revival". Now that scholarship has revealed this as fallacy it is now understood and being dealth with artistically. However, there are many organs are still playing from that period (I happen to play one of them, and the Great Bourdon 8 is almost unusable); however, this problem is easily remedied, as our soon will be, by having a tonal finisher come in and make the necessary voicing adjustments (yes folks, NICKS) to the pipes. However, aside from this, it is imperative for young organists to learn to approach each instrument individually, rather than trying to see where its failings are in relation to some huge behemoth. An organ does not have to be able to play everything in order to be successful, no more than an organists needs to be able to play everything. It is important for all of us to do what we do best, and enjoy doing.     ........................bruce cornely........................ o o o o ______________ o o o o d o g s ______________ o o h o o a o o ______________ o o p s   ............. cremona84000@webtv.net ............     No one appreciates the very special genius of your conversation as a dog does. -- Christopher Morley    
(back) Subject: Re: RE: Console Specs From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Fri, 27 Nov 1998 23:15:42 -0500 (EST)   good idea Alan. I'd just have these organs installed in a fire house. Those old ones had great acoustics. And, best of all, the pole it there already. Neat place to live. Next choice would be an old church or a lighthouse.   ........................bruce cornely........................ o o o o ______________ o o o o d o g s ______________ o o h o o a o o ______________ o o p s   ............. cremona84000@webtv.net ............     No one appreciates the very special genius of your conversation as a dog does. -- Christopher Morley    
(back) Subject: Re: Peaceful co-existance From: WRansomeJr@aol.com Date: Fri, 27 Nov 1998 23:28:25 EST   In a message dated 11/27/98 7:55:37 PM Pacific Standard Time, cremona84000@webtv.net writes:   > However, aside from this, it is imperative for young organists to learn > to approach each instrument individually, rather than trying to see > where its failings are in relation to some huge behemoth. An organ > does not have to be able to play everything in order to be successful, > no more than an organists needs to be able to play everything. It is > important for all of us to do what we do best, and enjoy doing. >   Bruce,   I happen to know from experience that a celeste is not necessarry. My first organ in great acoustics did not have one and I really didn't miss it. However, It is a stop that is called for in almost all "church" literature. Important, I think.   But yes, small can be beautiful, I don't disagree here. And yes, each instrument has to be taken individually and you can usually find something "nice" in everything you play. I just happen to think for the "average" church extreams of voicing style should be avoided! I am not recommending that all new organs need to be English replicas, but I do think they need to do justice to a broad range of literature. My feeling is that we also need to consider that we are not the only person that will ever play the instruments in our churches, and we need to think whether or not "our own dream instrument" will scare off future perspective organists for whatever reason.   However, if the decision to have a "specialty" instrument is the result of educated decision making (as opposed to organist pleasing or blind following of same) more power to them!  
(back) Subject: RE: Peaceful co-existance From: "Dennis Goward" <dgoward@uswest.net> Date: Fri, 27 Nov 1998 21:48:24 -0700   I play two radically different organs every day.   The one at church is a strict German classic (except for a flute celeste). Everything chiffs or spitz. It's a small organ, and because of it's very strong leanings toward the Baroque voices, I'm not so sure it does real good on Franck. It's a challange to make it sound good on some things. (It's an Allen MDS-8, and we'll be adding the expander unit to it, so that will solve some of the problem.)   The one at home is also a two manual, but much larger than the one at church. It offers more variety of sounds, and while it leans toward the same German classic, does have enough other things to allow a wider range of sounds -- not everything chiffs, and it offers not one but two 32' stops, and a more extensive pedal division. On it, I can play more things with more attention to historical accuracy.   However, phillistine that I am, I'll play anything, anywhere, on any organ! Let's face it, the folks at church probably could care less -- what's important is does it help them enter into their worship of God? If so, I'm sure Bach doesn't mind the celestes on All Men are Mortal, and Buxtehude doesn't get offended with the trem'med trumpet on In Dulci Jubilo.   But I still like Bruce's idea of a firestation full of different kinds of organs.   Dennis    
(back) Subject: Old church and lighthouse From: "Judy A. Ollikkala" <71431.2534@compuserve.com> Date: Fri, 27 Nov 1998 23:55:48 -0500   I want to live in an old church next to an operating train track, with my c1838 chamber pipe organ and cat. A lighthouse would be neat as a second summer home. All I have is the organ and cat at the moment, but I just made a deposit on a place in Florida which is 2 blocks from an operating train track and not too far from a lighthouse. And it's 20 minutes from the Red Sox spring training park! And I own a summer camp on a lake but no lighthouse there. Will see what I can do about that! And Bruce, the best acoustics are on the bottom floor of parking garages. My kids found that out.   Judy Ollikkala