PipeChat Digest #616 - Monday, November 30, 1998
 
Fw: Looking for info on a Pennsylvania Appleton
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com>
Re: McEwen Hall diaphones
  by "Scottish Theatre Organ Preservation Society" <mail@stops.org>
Re: McEwen Hall diaphones
  by "Scottish Theatre Organ Preservation Society" <mail@stops.org>
RE: McEwen Hall diaphones
  by "Dennis Goward" <dgoward@uswest.net>
Advent Music
  by "Judy A. Ollikkala" <71431.2534@compuserve.com>
Fw: Looking for info on a Pennsylvania Appleton
  by "Judy A. Ollikkala" <71431.2534@compuserve.com>
Re: console spec.
  by "Judy A. Ollikkala" <71431.2534@compuserve.com>
virus
  by "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net>
Re: console spec.
  by "Greg McAusland" <gregorymca@pavilion.co.uk>
RE: console spec.
  by "Dennis Goward" <dgoward@uswest.net>
Re:SICK HAMMOND
  by "Scottish Theatre Organ Preservation Society" <mail@stops.org>
Re: Fw: Looking for info on a Pennsylvania Appleton
  by "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com>
Re: Fw: Looking for info on a Pennsylvania Appleton
  by "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com>
Re: console spec.
  by "bruce cornely" <cremona84000@webtv.net>
Re: The enemy of pipe organs.
  by <RMaryman@aol.com>
Afraid of Bass
  by <Steskinner@aol.com>
Re: Advent Organ music
  by <RMaryman@aol.com>
Re: Advent Organ music
  by "bruce cornely" <cremona84000@webtv.net>
Re: The enemy of pipe organs.
  by "Kevin Cartwright" <kevin1@alaweb.com>
Re: Afraid of Bass
  by "Kevin Cartwright" <kevin1@alaweb.com>
Re: Afraid of Bass - a matter of $$$'s
  by <RMaryman@aol.com>
Foort's Traveling Moller (x-posted)
  by "Jon C. Habermaas" <opus1100@theatreorgans.com>
Re: The enemy of pipe organs.
  by <Afreed0904@aol.com>
Advent Sunday
  by "Bud" <budchris@earthlink.net>
Re: Foort's Traveling Moller (x-posted)
  by <tom@spry.com>
 


(back) Subject: Fw: Looking for info on a Pennsylvania Appleton From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com> Date: Sun, 29 Nov 1998 07:03:41 -0600   Hi. I have already tried this query with the "other" list. I received a letter from an old friend a couple months ago, and have misplaced this letter (I have scoured the house for it, to no avail). He was describing an organ in a small church about an hour's drive from Nazareth, PA (what town or in which direction I cannot tell you), that still had an Appleton in working order from about the same time (1830s) as the one at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Does this ring any bells of familiarity to anyone? Anyone have info, specs, etc.? (This sounds like a question for John Speller!) If I find the letter, I will provide the additional information.   Thanks, Glenda Sutton    
(back) Subject: Re: McEwen Hall diaphones From: "Scottish Theatre Organ Preservation Society" <mail@stops.org> Date: Sun, 29 Nov 1998 13:49:26 -0000   Sorry for the late reply, but have been away most of the week.   The McEwen Hall Diaphones (Posaunes) are the original beasties as = installed by RHJ. =20   They are positioned in an open chamber high up the left side wall above = the Swell Chamber, laying in a position slightly more than horizontal, = that is, their 'bottoms' are a little above their 'tops', to direct the = sound output of the pipes down into the hall, with the exception of the = top 14 notes, which are on a little chest, standing in 'standard' = fashion.....   On the original 1896 console (mobile, all electric, with capture = pistons, electric 'stop switch', and all manner of electric gadgets) = there was no facility to alter the power of these two stops, they were = simply there as Contra Diaphone Profunda 32 and Diaphone Profunda 16 = respectively.   Interestingly, the Solo Tibia Clausa is still there, exactly as = original, but renamed 'Rohr Flote', and sounds wonderful on tremulant in = 6 seconds reverb...........   A lot of the original RHJ pipework exists unaltered in the organ, as = well as a lot of the original in modified, or totally remodelled format. = The 1953 rebuild by Willis (yes, the organ lasted almost 60 years = before the console gave up -which latter was more likely to do with the = eggs which the students used to throw at the organist, than poor = workmanship on RHJ's part) was an 'economical rebuild and redesign' and = all of the original RHJ chests and soundboards are still in use. The = intention of the 1953 rebuild was to bring the instrument into line with = the average concert organ of the day, which meant standard Willis tonal = pattern throughout. Many 'good' things were done away with, like the = top octave extensions to the manuals for use with the octave couplers = (the chests are all 73 note, and the top 12 notes sit there, empty, like = a monument to crass idiocy)   The 1980's refurbishment by Rushworth & Dreaper did little apart from = replacing the relay action with solid state, as the Willis relay = switches for couplers etc in the 50's were not a wonderful design, and = latterly were prone to many dumb notes.   Hope this helps.   larry          
(back) Subject: Re: McEwen Hall diaphones From: "Scottish Theatre Organ Preservation Society" <mail@stops.org> Date: Sun, 29 Nov 1998 13:48:44 -0000       Sorry for the late reply, but have been away most of the week.   The McEwen Hall Diaphones (Posaunes) are the original beasties as = installed by RHJ. =20   They are positioned in an open chamber high up the left side wall above = the Swell Chamber, laying in a position slightly more than horizontal, = that is, their 'bottoms' are a little above their 'tops', to direct the = sound output of the pipes down into the hall, with the exception of the = top 14 notes, which are on a little chest, standing in 'standard' = fashion.....   On the original 1896 console (mobile, all electric, with capture = pistons, electric 'stop switch', and all manner of electric gadgets) = there was no facility to alter the power of these two stops, they were = simply there as Contra Diaphone Profunda 32 and Diaphone Profunda 16 = respectively.   Interestingly, the Solo Tibia Clausa is still there, exactly as = original, but renamed 'Rohr Flote', and sounds wonderful on tremulant in = 6 seconds reverb...........   A lot of the original RHJ pipework exists unaltered in the organ, as = well as a lot of the original in modified, or totally remodelled format. = The 1953 rebuild by Willis (yes, the organ lasted almost 60 years = before the console gave up -which latter was more likely to do with the = eggs which the students used to throw at the organist, than poor = workmanship on RHJ's part) was an 'economical rebuild and redesign' and = all of the original RHJ chests and soundboards are still in use. The = intention of the 1953 rebuild was to bring the instrument into line with = the average concert organ of the day, which meant standard Willis tonal = pattern throughout. Many 'good' things were done away with, like the = top octave extensions to the manuals for use with the octave couplers = (the chests are all 73 note, and the top 12 notes sit there, empty, like = a monument to crass idiocy)   The 1980's refurbishment by Rushworth & Dreaper did little apart from = replacing the relay action with solid state, as the Willis relay = switches for couplers etc in the 50's were not a wonderful design, and = latterly were prone to many dumb notes.   Hope this helps.   larry        
(back) Subject: RE: McEwen Hall diaphones From: "Dennis Goward" <dgoward@uswest.net> Date: Sun, 29 Nov 1998 07:11:57 -0700       > with the eggs which the students used to throw at the organist,   There's GOTTA be an interesting story behind this. Can you tell us?   Dennis Goward  
(back) Subject: Advent Music From: "Judy A. Ollikkala" <71431.2534@compuserve.com> Date: Sun, 29 Nov 1998 09:31:38 -0500   The Demessieurs book contains not only the nice Rorate Coeli but other pieces very suitable for service music. Judy Ollikkala  
(back) Subject: Fw: Looking for info on a Pennsylvania Appleton From: "Judy A. Ollikkala" <71431.2534@compuserve.com> Date: Sun, 29 Nov 1998 09:31:40 -0500   I have listed in Ashland PA an Appleton 2 M. of 1825 in St. John's Memorial Episcopal, it was rebuilt by Hilborne Roosevelt in 1886 2-12. The only othger one Ican find is a 1-4 in a residence in Malvern PA, and the original organ now in the Metropolitan was in Sacred Heart Rc, Plains PA from 1883 to 1981, coming from CT to PA, it is 1830 2 M. 13 stops. Judy Ollikkala  
(back) Subject: Re: console spec. From: "Judy A. Ollikkala" <71431.2534@compuserve.com> Date: Sun, 29 Nov 1998 09:43:02 -0500   Yay, Bruce!  
(back) Subject: virus From: "VEAGUE" <dutchorgan@svs.net> Date: Sun, 29 Nov 1998 10:17:15 -0500   Thank you Kevin. Have passed it on to friends. Rick dutchorgan@svs.net    
(back) Subject: Re: console spec. From: Greg McAusland <gregorymca@pavilion.co.uk> Date: Sun, 29 Nov 1998 18:48:28 -0000   Hey Bruce,   We can all dream can't we? And if it is in the pleasure of our own = homes why shouldn't we be able to play Bach on one temperament based on = one school of organ building, and then play Vierne on another = temperament based on another school building? I would sure love to see = a pipe organ doing Werkmeister one minute and doing Kirnberger the next, = but that ain't possible.   I was only merely pointing out that electronic organs can and will in = the future include features and possibilities extending further than = pipe organs. If we are gonna go down the road of electronic vs. pipe, = then I could ask the question what are the musical merits of a theatre = organ vs. the classical organ.... but I won't!   Come on Bruce, in the future you might be deputising at another church, = and they may have the latest Allen or Rodgers - and the sermon is very = long and terribly boring - but the manufacturers have kindly built in a = T.V. screen into your console!!   Best wishes.   Greg  
(back) Subject: RE: console spec. From: "Dennis Goward" <dgoward@uswest.net> Date: Sun, 29 Nov 1998 12:34:07 -0700   >and they may have the latest Allen or Rodgers - and the > sermon is very long and terribly boring - but the manufacturers have > kindly built in a T.V. screen into your console!! > >   How about internet access, so we can download midi files of all the service music and catch up on EMail during the sermon?   (just kidding)   Dennis Goward    
(back) Subject: Re:SICK HAMMOND From: "Scottish Theatre Organ Preservation Society" <mail@stops.org> Date: Sun, 29 Nov 1998 19:44:12 -0000   Hi all   !!HELP!!   We have a 1971 Hammond X66 with a dead divider card. Can anyone help.   Larry    
(back) Subject: Re: Fw: Looking for info on a Pennsylvania Appleton From: "John L. Speller" <jlspeller@stlnet.com> Date: Sun, 29 Nov 1998 15:00:34 -0600 (CST)   At 07:03 AM 11/29/98 -0600, Glenda Sutton wrote:   >Hi. I have already tried this query with the "other" list. I received a >letter from an old friend a couple months ago, and have misplaced this >letter (I have scoured the house for it, to no avail). He was describing >an organ in a small church about an hour's drive from Nazareth, PA (what >town or in which direction I cannot tell you), that still had an Appleton >in working order from about the same time (1830s) as the one at the >Metropolitan Museum of Art. > >Does this ring any bells of familiarity to anyone? Anyone have info, >specs, etc.? (This sounds like a question for John Speller!) > >If I find the letter, I will provide the additional information.   The Appleton in the Metropolitan Museum of Art came from Sacred Heart Roman Catholic Church, Plains, near Wilkes-Barre, Pa., so if the report is from a few years back it might refer to the instrument now in the Met.   There is another possible Appleton organ in Pennsylvania, however, which might also be the instrument indicated. This is the organ at St. John's Episcopal Church, Ashland, near Pottsville, Pa. The provenance of this instrument is uncertain, although most of it seems to date from around 1830, and at least the case seems fairly definitively to be by Appleton. The instrument was installed in the church by Frank Roosevelt in 1886, who had presumably taken it in trade for a new organ from another church. It was restored by McFarland & Vischer in 1972. The current specification is:   GREAT C-a''', 58 notes   8' Open Diapason 8' Stop'd Diapason 8' Dulcicissima 8' Unison Bass 4' Octave 4' Flute d' Amour 2.2/3' Twelfth 2' Fifteenth   SWELL C-a''', 58 notes   8' Open Diapason 8' Rohr Flute 8' Unison Bass 4' Principal 4' Rohr Flute 2' Fifteenth   PEDAL C-d' 27 notes   16' Bourdon   COUPLERS   Swell to Great Great to Pedal Swell to Pedal   Tremulant   Balanced Swell Pedal.   Three-tower carved mahogany casework with gilt facade pipes arranged 3-5-7-5-3. Curved central tower, gothic arch pipeshades.   Both the Great and Swell chests were originally G-compass, but the while Swell chest has 58 pallets, the Great chest rather curiously has 59 pallets. This suggests that the compass of the Great chest was originally GG to f''' 59 notes, while the Swell chest was GG (no GG#) to f''' 58 notes. This in turn suggests that the Great and Swell chests may originally have come from two different organs, and that perhaps Roosevelt made a two manual organ by putting two one manual organs together. In view of its uncertain origins, the fact that some at least of it seems to be by Appleton, and that the organ was rebuilt by Roosevelt, we often refer to it in OHS circles as "The Applevelt". Whoever built it, it is a very attractive little instrument.   John.    
(back) Subject: Re: Fw: Looking for info on a Pennsylvania Appleton From: "Glenda" <gksjd85@access.aic-fl.com> Date: Sun, 29 Nov 1998 15:12:07 -0600   How did I know you would have the answer? You're so knowledgeable, Master Speller. I will have to write my friend again (he is not of the computer age) to confirm whether this was indeed the instrument of which he spoke, but I feel confident you have hit the nail on the head.   Thank you ever so much - always a pleasure.   Glenda Sutton      
(back) Subject: Re: console spec. From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Sun, 29 Nov 1998 16:17:20 -0500 (EST)   Thank you! I'm glad someone understands.   ........................bruce cornely........................ o o o o ______________ o o o o d o g s ______________ o o h o o a o o ______________ o o p s   ............. cremona84000@webtv.net ............     No one appreciates the very special genius of your conversation as a dog does. -- Christopher Morley    
(back) Subject: Re: The enemy of pipe organs. From: RMaryman@aol.com Date: Sun, 29 Nov 1998 19:23:29 EST   In a message dated 98-11-20 23:42:25 EST, you write:   << To begin with, the organ pulls badly when being tuned, then when the lights are turned on, all our efforts are ruined. Of course, we will be called back to retune this beast. The church will say that we did a bad job the first time. Is this a rare situation, or do other church fathers treat their magnificent instruments this badly?? >> You didn't say, but I would get a couple of fairly accurate digital thermometers to place in the various divisions while you are tuning to keep track of how quickly and widely the temperatures of the different divisions of the instrument are varying. I tune a couple of church organs that have heating/AC vents nearby to the pipework and it is very troublesome to tune these organs. as the heat cycles up and down, the pipes go in and out of tune. (what aggrivation).   Any way... in ALL of my contracts I always state that if the church can not be held at an even temperature starting at LEAST four hours before tuning starts and continuing thru the entire tuning time that I will NOT guarantee the accuracy of the tuning since pipe organs are temperature sensitive instruments.   Hope this helps.   Rick Maryman Staunton VA  
(back) Subject: Afraid of Bass From: Steskinner@aol.com Date: Sun, 29 Nov 1998 19:42:11 EST   The discussion about Diaphones has prompted me to ask "Where did the fear of bass come from?" I re-installed a 16' open wood in the 1st UMC-Pasadena Skinner that A-S had replaced in the 60's with a non-descript 16" Violone (called "principle"). We left the violone and added a battle-ship scale Kimball open wood. AWESOME bass that now supports the rest of the organ. Then there are the many organs, sometimes upwards of 40 ranks, and the only 16' stop is a bourdon or a quintade and maybe a L/2 fagot, while there are 3 (!?) cornets.   Anybody know when we all got afraid of bass? Thankfully, it seems we are coming out of that fear, and into a new appreciation for the pew-shakers.   Steven Skinner First Presbyterian Church of the Covenant Erie, PA  
(back) Subject: Re: Advent Organ music From: RMaryman@aol.com Date: Sun, 29 Nov 1998 20:11:28 EST   Scott -   You may want to look at some of the hymn-based preludes for the Advent/Christmas season by Flor Peeters. They are published in a series by Peters. His prelude on Veni, Emmanuel is just enough offbeat to be ineresting without getting so far into left-field as to make the listeners/worshipers tune out. Maybe a list of what you are playing now whould help in making suggestions... Also, how about some of the old Yon (aside from the ubiquitous Gesu Bambino) such as Christmas in Sicily, and some of his other 'seasona;' compositions. Regrettably they are mostly out-of-print, but a good >old< collection in a university music collection may have some of them still.   Best of luck, and how about a compiled list of suggestions you get so that we can all benefitfrom your query.   Rick Maryman  
(back) Subject: Re: Advent Organ music From: cremona84000@webtv.net (bruce cornely) Date: Sun, 29 Nov 1998 20:20:43 -0500 (EST)   Scott, Edward Bairstow has written an absolutely scrumptous setting of Veni Emmanuel which is (I hope) one of "Three Pieces". It would sound wonderful on your Kilgen!!   ........................bruce cornely........................ o o o o ______________ o o o o d o g s ______________ o o h o o a o o ______________ o o p s   ............. cremona84000@webtv.net ............     No one appreciates the very special genius of your conversation as a dog does. -- Christopher Morley    
(back) Subject: Re: The enemy of pipe organs. From: Kevin Cartwright <kevin1@alaweb.com> Date: Sun, 29 Nov 1998 19:11:38 -0600   RMaryman@aol.com wrote:   > You didn't say, but I would get a couple of fairly accurate digital > thermometers to place in the various divisions while you are tuning to keep > track of how quickly and widely the temperatures of the different divisions of > the instrument are varying. I tune a couple of church organs that have > heating/AC vents nearby to the pipework and it is very troublesome to tune > these organs. as the heat cycles up and down, the pipes go in and out of tune. > (what aggrivation).   Our Wicks draws exterior (yes, outside, outdoors) air. When the swell division is closed (shades "drawn"), the temperature becomes the same as the outside, and not the inside. So, in the winter, we can have Celeste solos with Great acc., and everything is in tune. Otherwise, the Great division acts as a giant celeste, and the swell...I'll just say it's BAD out of tune. I keep telling the organist, "Leave the swell shades OPEN during the sermon, and the organ won't be out of tune for the last hymn!" But, she won't listen, and everything is out of tune as usual. Also, she leaves them closed for 30min prior to the service, and the blower is pumping the cold air into the leaky shade motor, and I could swear I sometimes see icicles on the mitered pipes...   The swell will go half a step flat. You can fool someone into thinking the organ actually has "tuning" by closing the shades for a while, playing one note from each division, but open the shades when you play. The tuning corrects itself noticeably fast as those shades open. You can also hold a note and the sharp, they'll be in tune, and scare the mess out of the organbuilder. "Something's wrong." They will go from in tune to their respective dissonance pretty fast. It'll make that vein in their foreheads bulge out...   Anyway,   Kevin C. kevin1@alaweb.com        
(back) Subject: Re: Afraid of Bass From: Kevin Cartwright <kevin1@alaweb.com> Date: Sun, 29 Nov 1998 19:29:14 -0600   Steskinner@aol.com wrote: > Then there are the many organs, sometimes upwards of 40 ranks, and the only > 16' stop is a bourdon or a quintade and maybe a L/2 fagot, while there are 3 > (!?) cornets.   That sounds like our school orchestra, one tuba (me), and 14 trumpets, and 9 alto saxes that blow like the world is going to end. I also play pedaltones (all the way down from the "lowest a tuba can officially go" E natural, to that double-low 32' pitch B flat and A natural). It sounds great behind the rest of the section, but this year, with one tuba, I have to blat out everything I can in the upper range just so it can be heard. But, I can take things down an octave or two in the quiet places, and people say "where's the organ?"   Also, our Wicks has a SubBass the size of a Gedackt, but the scale increases to awful proportions as you move up. The 8' F will blow a quiet piece off the planet, while the 16' F can be heard, and 16' C is barely there. We also have a 16' Open Erzahler that is very small scale. The 16' Posuane is full length, but only adds the harmonic tone, no real resonance. It, however, will blow you away. So, I've just described one rank and two extentions that make up the pittyful 16' range of our organ. The rest of the organ overpowers the bass, no matter what. And, my organ at home, has a Bourdon twice the scale of some organs I've seen, and it works just fine for the three ranks on top of it!   Anyway,   Kevin C. kevin1@alaweb.com        
(back) Subject: Re: Afraid of Bass - a matter of $$$'s From: RMaryman@aol.com Date: Sun, 29 Nov 1998 20:35:53 EST   In a message dated 98-11-29 19:47:43 EST, you write:   << Anybody know when we all got afraid of bass? Thankfully, it seems we are coming out of that fear, and into a new appreciation for the pew-shakers. >> Actually, I personally don't think it's a fear of bass - wooly diapaisons, yes, but NOT bass - as much as an economic decision on the part of builders. There are a lot of organ (buying) committees who are very "bang-for-the-buck" sensitive about 'how many ranks' for the given price tag of their organ. Let's face it...the 16' octave of an open wood (principal) costs more to produce than SEVERAL sets of mixture pipes, not to mention the space requirements (usually at a premium anyway, >especially< in a free-standing encased organ).   We have a moderately large Agressive-Miles 3M instrument in a nearby town whose whole pedal division is one very large-scale bourdon at numerous pitches, plus a couple of borrows from the Swell and Positiv divisions and a unit Posaune...not nearly enough bottom to counter-balance the several mixtures scattered in the 3 manual divisions. the organ is loud and (to my taste) a bit brittle souding, mainly due to the lack of a full, round bottom end.   Chord-ially   Rick Maryman Staunton, VA  
(back) Subject: Foort's Traveling Moller (x-posted) From: "Jon C. Habermaas" <opus1100@theatreorgans.com> Date: Sun, 29 Nov 1998 20:36:33 -0600   Dear Lists   Does anyone know the complete history of this organ. I understand that sometime after Foort stopped traveling with this organ that it went to a Dutch radio studio in I believe was Hiverstrom, Netherlands. There may also have been a BBC connection at sometime. Before it ended up in the Pasadena Civic Center, was it installed anywhere else in the U.S. ?   Thanks in advance for any information you can share on this interesting instrument.   regards,   Jon C. Habermaas  
(back) Subject: Re: The enemy of pipe organs. From: Afreed0904@aol.com Date: Sun, 29 Nov 1998 22:17:45 EST     In a message dated 11.29.98 7:26:48 PM, RMaryman@AOL.com writes:   <<pipe organs are temperature sensitive instruments.>>   Rick: Would it be even more precise to say that AIR is temperature-sensitive stuff? The organ shouldn't get the blame. It's just plain physics!   Alan Freed  
(back) Subject: Advent Sunday From: Bud <budchris@earthlink.net> Date: Sun, 29 Nov 1998 19:54:04 -0800   St. Matthew's Anglican Catholic Church Newport Beach CA USA   The Rev'd Fr. Stephen C. Scarlett, Rector The Rev'd Fr. Joseph Potter Miller, Assisting Mr. Bud Clark, Organist/Choirmaster   10:15 a.m. Sung Mass   Opening Voluntary - Saviour of the Nations Come (trio) - Bach Pro - Jesus, With Thy Church Abide (metrical litany sung in procession) Proper - Ad te levavi - Gregorian chant (in English) Ordinary - Merbecke Ser - Watchman, Tell Us Of The Night (Aberystwyth) Anthem - Verbum supernum - Parry (set to "Jerusalem" ... my alto and bass sections were on vacation!)   Communion Voluntary - Saviour of the Nations Come (ornamented) - Bach Com - Creator of the Stars of Night (Conditor alme) Rec - Lift Up Your Heads (Truro) Closing Voluntary - Saviour of the Nations, Come (organo pleno) - Bach          
(back) Subject: Re: Foort's Traveling Moller (x-posted) From: tom@spry.com Date: Sun, 29 Nov 1998 21:45:50 -0800   Hi Jon:   Prior to Pasadena Civic, the instrument was installed in Sandy Fleet's Organ Power Pizza restaurant in Pacific Beach (near San Diego), later renamed the Spaghetti and Pizza Pavilion. After the restaurant closed, the organ was sold to JB Nethercutt who made the donation to the City of Pasadena. The donation preempted a large Marr & Colton installation LATOS had planned for the auditorium.   Tom Blackwell Seattle, WA tom@pstos.org   http://www.pstos.org   On Sun, 29 Nov 1998, "Jon C. Habermaas" <opus1100@theatreorgans.com> wrote: >Dear Lists > >Does anyone know the complete history of this organ. I understand that >sometime after Foort stopped traveling with this organ that it went >to a Dutch radio studio in I believe was Hiverstrom, Netherlands. There >may also have been a BBC connection at sometime. Before it ended up >in the Pasadena Civic Center, was it installed anywhere else in the >U.S. ? > >Thanks in advance for any information you can share on this interesting >instrument. > >regards, > >Jon C. Habermaas > >"Pipe Up and Be Heard!" >PipeChat: A discussion List for pipe/digital organs & related topics >HOMEPAGE : http://www.pipechat.org >List: mailto:pipechat@pipechat.org >Administration: mailto:admin@pipechat.org >Subscribe/Unsubscribe: mailto:requests@pipechat.org >