PipeChat Digest #539 - Friday, October 2, 1998
 
Re: Spanish organs
  by "Vincent Lef vre" <vlefevere@unicall.be>
Re: Information Needed (X-Posted)
  by "Ralph Martin" <Rmartinjr@email.msn.com>
Re: Information Needed (X-Posted)
  by <ORGANUT@aol.com>
half open
  by "Ralph Martin" <Rmartinjr@email.msn.com>
1930s Albert Schweitzer Bach album sets
  by "Jim Lee Jr." <peej@xta.com>
Re: Information Needed (X-Posted)
  by "Ralph Martin" <Rmartinjr@email.msn.com>
Re: Information Needed (X-Posted)
  by "Bob Scarborough" <desertbob@truelink.net>
Re: 1930s Albert Schweitzer Bach album sets
  by "Bob Conway" <conwayb@post.queensu.ca>
 


(back) Subject: Re: Spanish organs From: "Vincent Lefèvre" <vlefevere@unicall.be> Date: Thu, 01 Oct 1998 21:58:30 +0200       Tim Rand wrote:   > I have the good fortune of being able to travel in Spain (leaving Oct. = 19). I > don't know if my itinerary will allow much time for organ crawling, but= does > anyone in the know have suggestions for organs to see? Any European ch= atters > out there or domestic world travelers? >   Tim, I suggest to contact via snail mail the Belgian organist Luk Bastiae= ns, Overhem 28A, B-3320 Hoegaarden, who performed on Spanish organs. He certa= inly will be able to give you worthful suggestions. Tel him you contact him on my b= ehalf. Vincent lef=E8vre, secretary of the non profit association "Organs in Fla= nders" vlefevere@unicall.be    
(back) Subject: Re: Information Needed (X-Posted) From: "Ralph Martin" <Rmartinjr@email.msn.com> Date: Thu, 1 Oct 1998 19:15:23 -0400   Thanks for the post, Phil. I really wish I had used the Rialto on my old show. I think it would have been much closer than the modified Conn and Leslie 251 that I used.   It's interesting how they split the complex voices into two channels, each one containing a different whole-tone scale.The tibias were great also. I'm really not a church organist, but would probably consider it if my church had a Rialto. I don't think the clergy would approve of my reharmonizations though.   best Ralph        
(back) Subject: Re: Information Needed (X-Posted) From: ORGANUT@aol.com Date: Thu, 1 Oct 1998 21:36:11 EDT   Ralph,   Occassionally I will play an offertory at our church. We have a Hammond B3 with two 122Leslies and a PR40 tone cabinet. I love open harmony and have found that the congregation does too. Someone will always ask what I did to the organ to get this sound? This setup is great for reharmonizations. I noticed when I was working on the Rialto that the 4 channel amp. was set up as a C and C# channel for the TIBIAS. This is equivalent to the diatonic pipe racking that Wurlitzer used.   Later, Phil  
(back) Subject: half open From: "Ralph Martin" <Rmartinjr@email.msn.com> Date: Thu, 1 Oct 1998 21:51:10 -0400   List I hope one or two of the theater organ buffs have investigated the modern blocks and have practiced them. Please note that it is important to play diminished chords on every non-chord melody note so that the arrangement will flow nicely. Don't just shift the melody.   Another technique that Jesse used quite frequently was half open. He probably used it more often than what most people call open harmony. A little explanation is useful here. When you are dealing with 3 part structures in the right hand, the middle note or 2nd voice is dropped an octave regardless of the inversion. On the rare occasions that Jesse used this device, he would sometimes play the two lower voices ( voices two and three) and play double glisses up to the next 2nd and 3rd voice. (these were chromatic glisses.   When we are dealing with 4 part structures, you may drop every 2nd voice one octave instead of doubling lead. For instance., instead of playing C-E-G-A in the right hand, simply omit the G (or second voice) and play it an octave lower. Continue playing each chord in the same manner. I usually assign voices three and four to the left hand and voices one and two for the right hand. ...Sort of similar to standard hymn arranging, but with modern chords. This device is really called half open because there is another device used in modern arranging called "full open" which I wont explain here since I have never seen it used in organ playing. For those of you who are just naturally inquisitive, full open is dropping both 2nd and 4th voices one octave. Using our original example of a C6 chord, it would now look like this: C G E A I don't know how else to show this without the use of printed music. Hope you understand this thus far. If not...........ask!   Ralph Martin            
(back) Subject: 1930s Albert Schweitzer Bach album sets From: "Jim Lee Jr." <peej@xta.com> Date: Thu, 01 Oct 1998 21:02:02 -0500   Folks, I have one of the Schweitzer 78 RPM album sets, circa 1936, Columbia M-310, recorded at Saint Aurelie Church, in Strasbourg. Would any of you know if he did additional set(s) from that period? The label is buff with brown print; apparently it was a Bach Society subscription set.   Jim    
(back) Subject: Re: Information Needed (X-Posted) From: "Ralph Martin" <Rmartinjr@email.msn.com> Date: Fri, 2 Oct 1998 00:38:45 -0400   Hi Phil I'm not entirely certain, but I believe that was the brainchild of Joe Iacanno. He was the top electronics whiz for Gulbransen and was quite a guy. I think he was responsible for implimenting a lot of innovative cicuitry for the company.   They were responsible for a lot of "firsts": the first transistorized organ, the first to build in a Lesie speaker system, etc. Those were the days when Tom Delaney was the Vice President and a Mr. Zack was the president. I believe Mr. Zack was a comptroller , originally, and working for Mr, Gulbransen before he died. Apparently, after his death, Mr. Zack was made the acting president.   The existing Gulbransen organ is now made by a company in Italy that was originally owned by a Mr. Piero Crucianelli. The company was (and is) called "Elka".I think, at this time, that their entire production is occupied with producing Gulbransen and is distributed and retailed by a large retail organization in California . The parent corporation, if memory serves, is The Crystal Corporation.   best Ralph Martin.        
(back) Subject: Re: Information Needed (X-Posted) From: Bob Scarborough <desertbob@truelink.net> Date: Thu, 01 Oct 1998 22:07:32 -0700   At 12:38 AM 10/2/98 -0400, Ralph Martin wrote:   >They were responsible for a lot of "firsts": the first transistorized organ,<snip>   Allen came out with their first xsistorized organ, the TC-1, in 1959. I can't remember if Gulbransen beat them on this one, or not. Clarification, please?   >The existing Gulbransen organ is now made by a company in Italy that was >originally owned by a Mr. Piero Crucianelli. The company was (and is) called >"Elka".I think, at this time, that their entire production is occupied with >producing Gulbransen and is distributed and retailed by a large retail >organization in California . The parent corporation, if memory serves, is >The Crystal Corporation.   Shows what I know. I didn't even know that Elkas were being sold under the Gulbransen name! How stupid of me. Where are such Gulbransens sold? I can't for the life of me remember ever seeing one anywhere around So. California. But I do remember the old Gulbransens...and yes, they were pretty top-drawer stuff in those days...IF you were into mini-theatre organs.   I remember famed organ and choral composer Dale Wood used to play one on Thrus-Fri-Sat nights at the Ray Keown's La Paloma Restaurant in Riverside, CA. Quite a nice job he did with that Rialto, too!   DeserTBoB    
(back) Subject: Re: 1930s Albert Schweitzer Bach album sets From: Bob Conway <conwayb@post.queensu.ca> Date: Fri, 02 Oct 1998 03:44:36 -0400   At 09:02 PM 10/1/98 -0500, you wrote: > Folks, > I have one of the Schweitzer 78 RPM album sets, circa 1936, Columbia >M-310, recorded at Saint Aurelie Church, in Strasbourg. Would any of you >know if he did additional set(s) from that period? The label is buff with >brown print; apparently it was a Bach Society subscription set. > > Jim     Jim 'et al',   I do not know how the Albert Schweitzer recordings were marketed in the U.S.A. back in the '30's, but in England they mostly came out as single 78's. When I moved to Canada, in 1968 I did not bring with me my collection of 78 rpm records, but I have been able to find something like ten or so LPs from the 1936 and the 1939 recordings. A lot of these have been re-issued on CD, you just have to keep looking. I have collected some of them, but somehow CDs don't seem to be quite the same as either the LPs or the original 78's   One of the 1939 recordings was made at the Church of All Hallows by the Tower where the organ was totally wrecked by a German bomb during the war. My choirmaster, Dr. Boulter, took me to the recital that Albert Schweitzer gave there that year, and I have been eternally grateful to have had the opportunity to see and hear the Master play. He really impressed a 14 year old with his performance.   All of the recordings and recitals that Albert Schweitzer performed were made for for the financial benefit of his hospital in Lambarine. He was the founder of the hospital, for he was first and foremost a humanitarian. He had only a pedal piano there to practice on, but his technique was, at the time, considered to be superb, and his writings on Bach were something to be read with the certainty that you were reading the "authority" on the subject. Of course, Schweiter's playing and his interpretation of Bach is all rather passe nowadays, but in his time he was the Man of the Century.   Thank you for bringing back pleasant memories to a septuagenarian!     Bob Conway   <conwayb@post.queensu.ca> http://www.greenford.demon.co.uk/bob/   Classics Director CFRC-FM 101.9 MHz Radio Queen's University Kingston, Ontario, K7L 3N6 CANADA   http://www.queensu.ca/cfrc